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WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY 

THE Z. SMITH REYNOLDS LIBRARY 







CALL NO. 




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NOT TO nE r'!5CULATED 



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MINUTES 

OF THE 

FIFTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 




HELD WITH 

OLIVE CHAPEL BAPTIST CHURCH 

WAKE COUNTY, N. C. 

OCTOBER 5-6, 1920 



The next session will be held ivith Bethel Church, Tuesday and 
Wednesday after the second Sunday in October, 1921 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

FIFTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 




HELD WITH 

OLIVE CHAPEL BAPTIST CHURCH 

WAKE COUNTY, N. C. 

OCTOBER 5-6, 1920 



The next session will be held 'with Bethel Church, Tuesday and 
Wednesday after the second Sunday in October, 1921 



/ 



OFFICERS 



W. S. OLIVE, Moderator - Apex 

W. M. WILLIAMS, Vice-Moderator Burlington 

CHAS. C. S]\nTH, Clerk Durham 

J. N. CHEEK, Treasurer Durham 

E. T. HOWERTON, Auditor _. Durham 

J. F. MeDUFFIE, Historian : Chapel Hill 



w- -s^r^ 



ORDAINED MINISTERS HOLDING CHURCH MEMBERSHIP IN \ 

ASSOCIATION ^ ■ Y 

Atkins, R. L Chicago, 111. Hartsell, Wallace Durliam 

Baskin, E. L Cliapel Hill Huff ham, J^ D., D.D Mebane 

Brinson, H. F East Durham Kinnett, A. D. Wake Forest 

BroAvn, James Burlington Lennon, R. S Haw River 

Buck, Martin W Burlington McDuffie, J. F .....Cliapel Hill . 

Byrd, C. Earl Morrisville Oldham, S. W Hillsboro 

Crain, W^m. J Durham Olive, W. S ...Apex, R. 3 

Couch, J. H Chapel Hill Overbv, L. W West Durham 

Cox, R. E West Durham Poe, E. D., Th.D Durham 

Davis, J. B Carrboro Roberts. P. A.. Th.D Mebane 

Dorsett, H. Grady Carrboro Ross, Clarence Cincinnati, O. 

Dunnegan, W. E. Durham, R. 3 Smith, Chas. C. Durham 

Green, Thos. M West Durham AVelsh, J. Elwood, Th.D Durham 

Harward, Geo. N Durham West, E. P Wake Forest 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

C. P. Norris, J. Elwood Welsh, H, F. Brinson, to serve three years 
each; T. M. Green, J. C. Markham, S. W. Andrews to serve two years 
each; Martin W. Buck, W. E. Young, A. P. Tilley, to serve one year 
each, 

COMMITTEE ON ORDER OF BUSINESS 

Martin W. Buck, E. L. Baskin, Chas. C. Smith. 

MESSENGERS 

To Southern Baptist Convention — E. L. Baskin, Alternate, H. F. Brinson. 
To Baptist State Convention— M. W. Buck, J. L. Hester, S. W. Andrews, 
S. W. Oldham. 

REPORTS FOR NEXT SESSION 
Subject Reported by Discussed by 

State Missions S. W. Oldham P. A. Roberts 

Associational Missions Executive Committee T. M. Green 

Foreign Missions W. M. Williams Wallace Hartsell 

Home Missions H. G. Dorsett J. Elwood Welsli 

Orphanage B. W. Rogers Wm. J. Crain 

Biblical Recorder L. G. Cole G. N. Harward 

Christian Education W. S. Crawford E. D. Poe 

Ministerial Relief J. T. Salmon S? W. Andrews 

Sunday Schools J. J. Ward R. H. Sykes 

Woman's Work C. L. Haywood H. F. Brinson 

Temperance J. L. Hester R. S. Lennon 

B. Y. P. U Clyde Johnson R. H. Andrews 



ENROLLMENT 



Messengers from the churches enrolled as follows: 

Antioch— H. C. Lloyd, E. L. Smith, C. R. Durham. 

Bells — ^E. G. Beckwith, Ex, Farrington, L. L. Bryan. 

Berea — J. M. Shepherd, C. E. McHaney. 

Berrys Grove — None enrolled. 

Bethel — Lueco Lloyd, Bryant Nevili, C. Whit Lloyd. 

Bethesda— D. H. Stallings, W. M. Ferrell, M. C. Jones. 

Burlington, First — Mrs. E. H. Andrews, Mrs. J. A. Thompson, Mrs. 
T. L. Sellers, Mrs. E. Homer Andrews, Mrs. Martin W. Buck. 

Burlington, Hocutt Memorial — James Brown, D. S. Foster, W. M. 
Williams. 

Burlington, Glencoe — None enrolled. 

Cane Creek — None enrolled. 

Chapel Hill— S. W. Andrews, J. M. Cheek, E, A. Eubanks. 

Carrboro — H. M. Williams, E. W. Hobbs, Mrs. Joe Sparrow, W. C. 
Pearson. 

Cedar Fork — C. B. Green, J. E. House. 

Cross Eoads — None enrolled. 

Durham, East— W. E. Stanley, W. E. Young, Z. B. Teel. 

Durham, Edgemont— J. E. Cain, W. H. Bright, W. B. Eogers, E. E. 
Hurst, L. V. Byrd. 

Durham, First— B. W. Eogers, W. M. Williams, W. A. Fulford, E. 
T. Howerton, Jr., W. O. Williams, L. G. Cole, E. Clyde Johnson, H. T. 
Johnson. 

Durham, Lakewood — F. A. Ward, E. C. Harris, T. E. Pendergrass. 

Durham, North — K. U. Bryan. 

Durham, Temple — rC. B. Laws, J. C. Markham. 

Durham, West— L. W. Overby, W. P. Sneed, Jno. L. Hester, W. P. 
Phillips. 

Efland— H. D. Smith. 

Ebenezer — J. M. Martin, A. E. Garrard. 

Ephesus — Miss Maud Cannady, G. M. Pope, Mrs. G. M. Pope.' 

Graham— N. F. Cole, A. P. Williams. 

Gorman — ^L. M. Duncan, F. W. Tilley. 

Haw Eiver — Miss Clydia Cole, Miss Eosa Cole. 

Hillsboro, First— P. H. Smith, J. J. Ward. 

Hillsboro, West Hill — None enrolled. 

Lowe's Grove — J. L. Green, T. L. Pendergrass. 

Lystra — A. E. Cole. 

Mars Hill — L. Mincey, L. C. Wilson. 

Mebane — J. M. Eimmer, W. S. Crawford, Mrs. P. A. Eoberts. 

Merry Oaks — E. J. Yates, A. G. Kendrick. 

Moore's Chapel— A. T. Eiddle, W. J. Eiddle. 

Mount Ada — Cicero Jake, D. B. Yarborough. 

Mount Carmel — M. J. Eiggsbee. 

Mount Gilead— Z. Y. Johnson, J. B. Ward, A. J. Neal. 

Mount Hermon — J. D. Whitfield, Miss Eena E. Andrews, Miss 
Blanche Harris, Mrs. H. A. White. 

Mount Moriah — J. T. Couch. 

Mount Pisgah— E. F. Mulholland, J. F. Council, A. C. Scott, 
A. W. Byrd. 

Olive Branch — Geo. C. Stallings. 



6 Fifty-first Annual Session 

Olive Chapel— H.T.]4^ren£e^ W._H.. Mills,, J. M. Sears, C. H. 

Wilson. T 'k^ nM^ ^ IC) 'A rid 

Pleasant Hill — W. A.' CopeTand." 

Eed Mountain— C. E. O 'Briant^ IL_T. Mangum, B. P. Bowling. 

Eoberson Grove— D. M. Powell, S. H. Stafford. 

Eose of Sharon-^-^Jii W. James,. J. i/. Scoitt,-Jlf., Bennie Dunnagan. 

Sandy Level — Monie ;ei!irolled: : • ' J^ 'i ,ij7.ol 

Swepsonville^^t^'. PJ. Phillip&,vD:; ^:: Cosik. .iltiv- 

Yates — Curtis D. Crutchfield,. Paul Eickettxei:! 

The following pastors in the association enrolled: E, L. Baskin, 
H. r. Brinson, Martin m^BuiikyiWfflu J. rCraini T. M. Green, Wallace 
Hartsell, Geo. N. Harwafd, E.' S.^ xLeiinon§i-Ei'.-.E. M,, Freeman, J. F. 
McDuiiie-, J. D. Moore, a. H; Morris,. B. W..iOMham, W. S. Olive, E. 
D. Poe, P.. A, Eoberts,:i3aiasiJC. .Smith^iir. ELwodd Welsh, L. U. Weston, 
HI G-^<''Dorsett* .-^ /I avuqiQ. somaL — iCi-;;':iK:;]^ 

A number of the pastors were absent, among them being J. B. 
Davis, L. E. Dixon, C. H. CashwdJ, E. PcWest, J. Y. Green, J. E. 
Cantrell. l^^ - 

Note.: Doubtless other messengers were present than those in the 
al)ov¥ list, ibatthfiir enrollment slips did noliiget to the clerk. 

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PART I 

PROCEEDINGS 



Olive Chapel Baptist Church, October 5th, 1920. 
MOKNING SESSION 

The Mount Zion Baptist Association was called to order at 10:00 
'clock by Moderator J. F. McDuffie. Devotional exercises were con- 
ducted by Eev. Martin W. Buck, of Burlington. 

H. F. Brinson reported on order of business, and the following order 
was adopted for this morning: — Enrollment of Delegates and Organi- 
zation; the Annual Sermon; Miscellaneous Business. 

S. W. Oldham and Geo. N. Harward were appointed as tellers, and 
reported that 55 messengers had enrolled. Moderator McDuffie stated 
that he would not permit his name to be presented for re-election. M. 
W. Buck, in a neat speech, nominated W. S. Olive, the pastor of the 
church in which the Association meets. The nomination was seconded 
by Chas. C, Smith. The clerk was instructed to cast the ballot of the 
body for Bro. Olive. Walter M. Williams, of Burlington, was nominated 
for Vice-Moderator, and on instruction the clerk cast the vote of the 
body for Bro. Williams. Chas. C. Smith was re-elected as clerk; J. N. 
Cheek, was re-elected as Treasurer; 8.r>d J. F. McDuffie, was elected as 
Historian. 

The annual sermon was preached by J. Elwood Welsh, of the First 
Church, Durham, from the text in Isaiah 6:8, " Here am I ; send me, ' ' 
the subject being '^'The Fresh Opportunity Afforded the Christian 
Ministry. ' ' The sermon was greatly helpful to those who heard, and 
it was a powerful plea for j^oung men to give themselves to this, the 
highest of all, callings. 



Bro. Welsh moved that that article II of the Constitution be so 
amended as to read ' ' Fifty ' ' instead of ' ' Twenty-five, ' ' dollars, as com- 
pensation for the clerk's services. The motion was carried after having 
been seconded. 

The following visitors were recognized by the Association: J. S. 
Farmer, representing the Biblical Eecorder; M. L. Kesler, General 
M:anager of the Thomasville Orphanage; J. M. Hilliard, Moderator of 
the Piedmont Association; Titus Mills, of the Johnston Association, and 
the only living minister who was present at the organization of the 
Mt. Zion Association in 1870; and J. M. Arnette, of Wagram, N. C, 
and a former pastor in this Association. 

The following new pastors were introduced to the Association: P. A. 
Eoberts, of Mebane; J. H. Bass, of the Eed Mountain church; E. D, 
Poe, of the Temple Church, Duiham; and J. D. Moore, of the Bethesda 
church. 

An order of business was adopted for the afternoon, when the 
Association adjourned for dinner. 

AFTEENOON SESSION 

After prayer and a song, the Moderator appointed the Finance 

Committee as follows: W. E. Young, W. M. Williams, and B. W. Eogers. 

The report on Sunday Schools was presented by S. W. Andrews, 



Fifty-first Annual Session 



Chapel Hill, and was adopted after discussion by Bro. Andrews, and 
E. L. Middleton, our State S. S. Secretary. 

The report on the orphanage was read by L. G, Cole, and was adopted 
after a strong presentation of the Orphanage work by Dr. Kesler. 

J. J. Ward, Hillsboro, reported on Biblical Recorder. The report was 
discussed by brethren T. M. Green, J. S. Farmer, Chas. C. Smith, and 
M. L. Kesler. 

The report on B. Y. P. U. was read by B. W. Rogers, Durham, 
and was adopted after discussion by T. M. Green and J. D. Moore. 
M. W. Buck moved that a committee of three be appointed to en- 
deavor to effect an association-wide B. Y. P. U. organization. Motion 
was carried. 

M. W. Buck, S. W. AndrcAvs, A. E. Cole, A. C. Scott, and B. P. 
Bowling, were appointed to constitute the committee on Place and 
Preacher for next session of the Association. 

The report on Woman 's Work, prepared by R. H. Sykes, Durham, was 
read by Bro. Welsh. On motion a vote of appreciation was extended 
to the W. M. U. of this Association for the effective service rendered 
during the past year. The report was adopted. 

After adopting an order of business for Wednesday the Association 
adjourned to meet at 9:30 tomorrow morning. 

MORNING SESSION— WEDNESDAY 

The Association was called to order by the Moderator, short devotions 
being conducted. Bro. Green moved that Miscellaneous Business be de- 
ferred until immediately preceding the address of Walt. N. Johnson. 
The motion prevailed. 

The reports on the various phases of our Mission work were read as 
follows: on State Missions, by Walt. M. Williams; on Foreign Missions, 
by S. W. Oldham; ou Home Missions by P. A. Roberts; on Christian 
Education by G. N. Harward; on Ministerial Relief by H. G. Dorsett; 
on Associational Missions by the Clerk on behalf of the Chairman of 
the Executive Committee. 

Chas. C. Smith, the Director of the Seventy-Five Million Campaign 
for this Association read his report, which was ordered incorporated in 
the minutes. In compliance with a suggestion made in the report a 
committee was appointed consisting of J. Elwood Welsh, E. L. Baskin, 
S. W. Oldham, A. T. Olive, and L. G. Cole, to consider the feasibility of 
employing an associational worker for full time, and to report to the 
Association this afternoon. On motion the Association, by rising, ex- 
tended to the Director its appreciation of the work done in the Cam- 
paign. A like vote was extended to Mrs. C. L. Haywood, Durham, for 
her most effective service as W. M. U. Director for the Association in 
the Campaign. Mrs. Haywood, on invitation of the body, then briefly 
addressed the Association. 

The following committees were announced by the Moderator: Com- 
mittee to nominate the Executive Committee: S. W. Oldham, W. C. 
Pearson, R. E. Hurst. To nominate messengers to Southern Baptist 
Convention, R. L. Smith, T. W. Booker, R. T. Shipp. To nominate mes- 
sengers to the Baptist State Convention: G. C, Stallings, J. M. Rimmer, 
Mack Williams. 

Bro. Buck moved to amend the Constitution by adding Article 18. 
The article was adopted and is printed in the Constitution in another 
division of these minutes. 

Bro. Welsh moved the addition of Article 19 to the Constitution. 
This was adopted and is added to the Constitution. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 



On motion the Association decided to have three day sessions in 
the future instead of two. 

On motion Article 2 of the Constitution was amended to read ''after 
the second Sunday in October. ' ' 

On motion the following committee was appointed on Digest of 
Church Letters to report at next session: J. Elwood Welsh, C. L. Hay- 
wood, C. P. Norris, and the Clerk. 

Walt. N. Johnson, State Secretary of Missions, addressed the body, 
his subject being, ''Education, Missions, and Stewardship." The Asso- 
ciation then adjourned for dinner. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

Prayer by G. N. Cowan, pastor of the Apex Baptist church. The 
report on Temperance was read by Wallace Hartsell, and discussed by 
him and G. N. Harward. 

M. W. Buck addressed the body most earnestly on the subject of 
Associational Missions. Many churches having sent in all their mission 
money undesignated to the State Treasurer at Ealeigh, Bro. Buck moved 
that the Executive Committee of the Association be instructed to en- 
deavor to adjust the difference as to Associational Missions to the satis- 
faction of the Committee and the State Board of Missions. Motion 
carried. 

On motion the churches of the Association are earnestly requested to 
send all of their Associational Mission money directly to Treasurer J. 
N. Cheek, in Durham. 

Bro. Welsh on behalf of the committee on full-time associational 
Avorker reported that in the opinion of the committee such a worker is 
needed. After brief discussion it was moved that the matter be referred 
to the Executive Committee with j)ower to act, provided that arrange- 
ments can be made for the support of such a worker. 

The Committee on Place and Preacher recommended that the body 
meet Avith the Bethel church, and that E. D. Poe preach the annual 
sermon. The recommendations were adopted. 

H. F. Brinson offered the following resolution, Avhich was adopted by 
unanimous vote of the Association : ' ' Eesolved, that this Association 
extend to pastor and people of this church our sincere thanks for the 
magnificent entertainment provided during the present session. 

The folloAving resolution from the Woman's Missionary Union were 
read by Mrs. S. W. Oldham, Hillsboro, and which were adopted: 

Resolved, That Ave extend to Mrs. W. N. Jones, President of State 
W. M. U., Mrs. C. L. HayAvood, Superintendent Mt. Zion W. M. U., to 
the leader and children of the Sunbeam band of Olive Chapel Church 
and others, Avho assisted in carrying out the program our deepest appre- 
ciation for the helpful program rendered. 

Resolved, That the Women of the Mt. Zion Association shall em- 
phasize in our local societies the importance of Bible Study and Per- 
sonal Service, thus strengthening our own spiritual lives and Avinning 
others to Christ, "That in all things He might have pre-eminence." 

Resolved, That we earnestly, prayerfully and patiently encourage and 
stimulate in every way possbile the Y. W. A., G. A., P. A. and Sun- 
beam societies in our churches. 

Resolved, That AA-e strive more faithfully than heretofore to attain 
the standard of excellence. 

Resolved, That Ave extend our hearty thanks to the good people of 



10 . Fifty-first Annual Session 



Olive Chapel for their generous and royal entertainment, assuring them 
that their enthusiasm will inspire and strengthen us. who labor for the 
Master. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

MRS. S. W. OLDHAM, 
MISS BERTHA GATES, 
MRS. VIOLA YOUNG. 

S. W. Oldham called attention to the annual meeting of the Asso- 
ciation al S. S. Convention which meets with the Edgemont church, 
Durham, in April next, and urged attendance on the part of the pastors 
and the Sunday School forces. 

It M^as moved that overlooked business be referred to the Executive 
Committee. 

After prayer by Bro. Brinson the Association adjourned. 

W. S. OLIVE, Moderator. 
CHAS. C. SMITH, Clerk. 



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The 75-Millioii Campaigu iu the Association as a whole resulted in 
^liet.^iost ^glori<>ii§!^yiict^ry. in the :lUstory qf , this boidy, the subscriptions 
d^om the ehurobep t@taijiig.^407.,234£47:>:ij^ EgaiJiSl our .quota oi $325>- 
^0.00. :_ \:.- xi,Jji.iM0S5A c-i.:^ 1^ -iO-.-iia -:!:- ••-rfx----' : :: .-: :-:-.v.-oO 
•rS Through the- co-operation of the Executive Gommittee of the Asso- 
<^ation and : tlie State Headquarters : of the Campaign at Raleigh, the 
:^'dgemont X'hurch was induced to release for the months of October and 
iJ^ovemb^r;her ijastor that h€ might undertake the. work as Associational 
Director for the Campaign. Under the arrangement made the Executive 
^Ckmimitt^e paid tliesalary of the Director, while the expense incurred in 
the conducting of the Campaign was borne by the State Headquai'ters. 
The woi'k of the Director Avas, arduous. It was made so at the outset 
by his "hot having been cTiosen until late in September when he should 
have been -at' his task the first of August. ■ It was made arduous, too, 
by the great amount of correspoiidence necessary, more tham 600 letters 
having been sent out by the Director in the interest of the^ Campaign, 
and many, many packages of literature and tracts mailed by him to the 
various churches. The directbr^ Visited sixteen- churches and made ad- 
dresses in them in the interest of- the Campaign, besides attending several 
Victory Schools, a number of conferences, and quite a good -many con- 
sultations of small groups. The thing that was hardest of all was the 
lack of co-operation that the Director was unable to secure from pastors 
of twielve of our churches! Four church directors were entirely un- 
responslA^e- to the appeals of the Director, while there are three churches 
that, as far as the Director was able to ascertain made almost no effort 
to do 'their part in this great Campaign that had so largely captured 
the imagination of the denomination and aroused its enthusiastic zeal. 
Perhaps ^without exception' the N&lKirches that failed- in reaching their 
quotas are those the directors of- which failed to- attend the training 
centers and the various conferences held for their benefit and instruction. 
The task was also a joy.- With the exception just noted there was 
not only hearty, but enth'ugiastic co-operation accorded the Director. 
While the pastors of twelve t-lvurches seemingly did 4iot- Tend their co- 
operation there were only four men wIjo were pastors of those churches. 
In mo^t^ of these twelve churCfees^the church directors were away ahead 
of th^ii^ pastors in vision and zeal, and ■ where the pastors failed these 
directOM;- [together with the-Wf-M. U. directors took hold of the task 
with intelligence, organized 'iSMr churches • along the line stiggested by 
the Nai^li-^ille headquarteriy-'dM<J-l)rought their churches to glorious vic- 
tory. ''IDll^-work of the Director "^-as made a joy-by the hearty backing up 
of all' 'theP other pastors, who volunteered tlieir services to do -what the 
DirectCvf might ask them;J aiKl ' then, in addition;- finding ^ plafees that 
needed instruction and inspiration and going to them afnd- 'lending a 
hel]:»iug hand. Nearly everywhere the- churches were anxious ' to hear 
the storj^-of the Campaign ami -the Director -and other speakers were 
in almost every instance greeted by good size crowds who listened with 



12 Fifty-first Annual Session 



eagerness as the underlying principles of the Campaign were explained 
to them. Church and W. M. U. directors were in great earnest; team 
captains and workers were diligent in informing themselves and in im- 
parting their information to others. For the success of the Campaign 
too much credit can not be given to Mrs. C. L. Haywood, Durham, the 
Associational W. M. U. Director, and her corps of efficient helpers. 
They wrought valiantly, intelligently and well. 

One of the greatest single gatherings held in connection with the 
Campaign in this Association was a conference for all the workers in 
all of the churches held on November 6th, in the Temple church, Durham. 
This meeting was spiritual, enthusiastic, helpful; and was attended by 
about 400 Campaign workers. 

Victory Week came. What would be the outcome? At a State 
conference held in Ealeigh during the meeting of the Baptist State 
Convention in November the Director of this Association reported that 
in his opinion our churches would subscribe around $400,000.00. By 
midnight of November 30th, the first day of that memorable week, he 
knew that the quota of $325,000.00 had been passed, and the judgment 
of the Director was shown to be correct by the final reports made which 
total the splendid sum stated in the opening paragraph. 

The following is the story by churches of amounts raised and theii 
quotas : 

Churches Subscription Quota 

Antioch $ 2,782.25 $ 3,000 

Bells 2,377.00 3,000 

Berea 1,925.00 4,000 

Berry's Grove 650.00 3,000 

Bethel 2,878.00 5,000 

Bethesda 1,324.00 3,000 

Burlington, First 20,000.00 ' 15,000 

Hocutt Memorial 7,875.00 5,000 

Cane Creek 2,785.00 3,000 

Carrboro 13,182.25 4,000 

Cedar Fork 5,909.00 4,000 

Chapel Hill 14,000.00 5,000 

Cross Roads : 2,084.00 2,000 

Durham, First 85,100.00 78,000 

Durham, East 23,000.00 17,500 

Durham, Edgemont 25,000.00 15,000 

Durham, Lakewood 6,802.00 5,000 

Durham, North 11,934.00 10,000 

Durham, West 20,300.00 17,500 

Durham, Temple 42,285.00 40,000 

Ebenezer 470.00 1,000 

Efland 1,122.75 1,000 

Ephesus 1,474.00 1,000 

Glencoe 1,536.00 1,000 

Gorman 625.00 1,000 

Graham 7,159.00 5,000 

Haw River 1,000.00 1,000 

Hillsboro 5,401.00 5,000 

Lowe's Grove 3,025.00 3,000 

Lystra 5,244.77 5,000 

Mars Hill 3,543.00 4,000 ■ 

Mebane 12,400.00 6,500 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 13 



Churches Subscription Quota 

Merrv Oaks 1.91S.50 1,000 

Moore's Chapel 1,023.00 1,000 

Mt. Adar 3,005.00 3,000 

Mt. Carniel 3.582.75 3,000 

:^[t. Hermon 2,200.00 2,000 

Mt. Moriah 3,338.00 3,000 

Mt. Pisgah - 9.324.00 5,000 

Olive Branch 2,031.00 3,000 

Olive Chapel 15.166.95 10.000 

Pleasant Hill 1,096.75 1,000 

Red Mountain 3,000.00 3.000 

Roberson Grove 375.00 3,000 

Rose of Sharon 1.529.50 2,000 

Sandy Level 1,17-4.00 1,000 

Swepsonville 5,171,00 3,000 

West Hill 1,000.00 1,000 

Yates - 3.000.00 3,000 

Mt. Gilead ...- 3.750.00 3.000 

Four of the churches exactly subscribed their Cjuotas; while twelve 
of them fell short. Of these twelve only two seem to have made com- 
plete failures of the Campaign, and it is due to Mars Hill church, 
which had a quota of $4,000 and subscribed more than $3,500, to say 
that in the opinion of the Director this church is the only one in the 
Association that was assigned a quota larger than the ability of the 
church. The subscription made is one of the very best in the Associa- 
tion according to membership and resources. The church made no sign 
of a protest, but valiantly went to work and did what it could to 
measure up to what Avas asked of it. Thirty-four of the churches ex- 
ceeded their quotas, a number of them by large margins. Deserving of 
special mention are the churches of Chapel Hill and Carrboro, which 
subscribed respectively $14,000 and $13,000 AAdth quotas of $5,000 and 
$4,000, The Temple church, Durham, too, is Avorthy of mention for, 
Avith a quota of $40,000 and Avithout a pastor subscriptions for more 
than $42,000 Avere secured. 

In closing this report the Director takes the liberty of suggesting 
to the Association five lessons that came to him from conducting the 
Campaign : 

First, Our people as a Avhole do not yet knoAv our denominational 
Avork. 

Second, They do not take nor read our denominational press and 
missionary literature. 

Third, The members of our churches are not missionary in spirit 
though they be so in name, and need to be grounded in the fundamental 
principles of missions. 

Fourth, Not a single full or half time church failed to reach and 
exceed its quota. All of those aa-Iio fell short are fourth-time churches, 
while a goodly proportion of them are served by absentee pastors. Is 
this sutficient argument to convince some of our churches of the neces- 
sity of having more preaching, and of locating a pastor AAdthin easy 
reach of the membership? 

Fifth, The Association is the Aveakest point in our denominational 
machinery. As such the Association does almost no functioning. Few 
are the Associations that have any program to be carried out betAveen 
sessions. The State Convention is in much closer touch betAveen ses- 
sions with OliA'e Chapel church than is the Mt. Zion Association. A 



14 Fifty-first Annual Session 



church lags and there is no one to inquire why or offer a word of en- 
couragement. Churches become pastorless and there is no one to take 
the initiative in helping them. A Sunday School or other organization 
goes dead, but no one sees or even knows anything about it until the 
Association meets again, and then no one goes into the matter. At one 
time during the past year three of our churches were pastorless. An 
enlistment man doubtless could have taken tactful and practical steps 
and succeeded in locating a pastor in the midst of the three churches. 
One of these churches is now served by a pastor who lives in another 
county; and the other two by men whose homes are outside the bounds 
of this Association. What a field the Mt. Zion Association has for a 
full time Associational worker! Sunday School teachers need to be 
trained; as do B. Y. P. U. ; W. M. U. and other workers. Churches 
need to be encouraged and helped to have more preaching; to build 
new meeting houses and to construct pastors ' homes ; and to add Sunday 
School equipment. Such a man could go to a church and stay there a 
month, if necessary, carrying on Sunday School, B. Y. P. U., and 
W. M. U., institutes. He should be able to stay with a church until 
he can really help that church, and not have to report how many sermons 
he has preached, nor how many miles he has traveled, but to malse a 
report of concrete help that he has been to a church. He should not 
be expected to visit every church in the Association in a year; neither 
should be permitted to supply without extra compensation the pulpits 
of strong churches while the pastor is aAvay on a vacation, or off 
holding a protracted meeting where he will be magnificently compen- 
sated. This last lesson of the Campaign the Director sincerely hopes 
will at least be discussed by the body. 

It was a delight to the Director to have served the Association in 
this capacity, and to have had this part in the greatest task that our 
denomination has ever undertaken. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. C. SMITH. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

The statistics of the Foreign Mission Board, published May, 1920, 
show that we have, in foreign lands, 542 churches, one fourth of which 
are self-supporting, more than half of which worship in houses owned 
by the Board or by these churches. 

Into the fellowship of these churches were baptised in 1919, 6,834, 
the largest number reported in any single year. The total membership 
is now 57,438. 

These native churches gave last year $242,460.00, or $4.22 per mem- 
ber. Southern Baptists gave in 1919, $6.19 per member. 

In 836 Sunday Schools are enrolled 47,672, which is 83 per cent of 
the total church membership. In the Southern Baptist Convention 
70 per cent of the church membership is enrolled in the Sunday School. 

The work of the day schools has had a wonderful growth. Last 
year the Board had 554 schools, in which were taught 18,514 students, 
of all grades. Many of the converts come out of these schools. In our 
ten Theological Training Schools were enrolled 345 students. Perhaps 
the most fruitful of all our agencies in foreign lands is our medical 
work. In the year 1919, our medical missionaries gave 205,098 treats 
ments, and they preached the gospel to many a person who was ready 
to receive it, and who would not otherwise have heard it. 

Our foreign missionary force Avas last year 341, to which we may 
add 979 native missionaries, a total of 1320 workers. Sinc« these 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 15 



figures were given us in May, 65 new missionaries have been appointed 
and sent out by the Board, and a ship load of missionaries to China 
and Japan was sent out at once on the 17th of August, 1920. 

The 75-Million Campaign has brought a new day to the work of our 
Foreign Mission Board. Besides what it did for the churches in the 
home land, it has had far-reaching results on the churches abroad. They 
have been stimulated in a wonderful way. They have put on similar 
campaigns, and have pledged more than a million dollars. Time alone 
can reveal what this will mean for the future development of these 
churches in foreign lands, and what it will mean for the progress of 
Christianity throughout the whole world. 

In pledging, we triumphed gloriously. The real test is to come in 
making good and enlarging these pledges. The denominations of the 
world are waiting to see and in fact the w^orld itself, is looking on to 
see if we will pay as well as we pledged. We cannot afford to fail. 
Our honor is in the balance, and the cause of our Lord and Master de- 
mands that we do our best. 

Eespectfully, 

S. W. OLDHAM, Committee. 

EEPORT ON HOME MISSIONS 

Some one has said that Baptists have been so busy making history 
that they have not had time to write any. In the few sentences into 
which this report has been couched more attention has been given to 
facing the future than to recounting statistics of past accomplishments. 
The Home Mission Board has wrought well in Kingdom building, and 
has made great progress in climbing the mountain of success; but there 
are such glorious heights yet attainable which are beckoning us on, 
that we must not spend too much time viewing the ground gained. We 
should rather emulate the great apostle, ''Forgetting those things 
which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are be- 
fore, I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God 
in Christ Jesus. ' ' When we shall have attained this mark, we will be 
rendering perfect service in Kingdom building. For the present, we 
must be content to take our gaze from the one which has been brought 
safely into the fold, and go out and search for the many who are lost. 

For this purpose, the Home Board must furnish the foundation to sus- 
tain the super-structure of all other projects looking to this end. Since 
the launching of the 75-Million Campaign, the Home Board has rendered 
fine service in this direction. It threw its whole strength in the move- 
ment, and accomplished a great deal, especially in enlisting the weak, 
non-co-operating churches. 

It is attempting a still greater work in its educational project, for 
it is literally true that as a denomination, we are perishing for want of 
knowledge. Too much emphasis can not be laid on this effort. 

Another campaign which I long to see undertaken, is an effort to 
lead our people to more consistent consecrated lives. The Home Board, 
it seems to me, is the proper agency to take the lead in such a movement. 

One more thing, let us hope that the Home Board will continue to do 
in a still greater degree, and that is to serve as a unifying organ. We 
are getting so large as a denomination, unless special effort is put forth 
to maintain our present unanimity, we are in danger of breaking up into 
factions. One could hope for a general religious paper for this purpose. 



16 



Fifty-first Annual Session 



For our encouragement, the following statistics from the Board 's 
report to the S. B. Convention is included. 



Amount 
Raised 



Missionaries 
Commissioned 



Stations 



Baptisms 



Churches 
Organized 



3 845-1903 
1903-1913 
1913-1920 



$3,520,000 
3,584.000 
5,337,000 



10,586 
10,407 
10,770 



38,793 
27,498 
25,094 



82,742 
187,299 
255,210 



3,649 
3,068 
1,347 



Respectfully submitted, 

P. A. ROBEETS. 



REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS 

Our State Mission work is under the direction of a Board of Missions, 
composed of 21 members appointed each year by the Baptist State 
Convention and 65 associational members appointed by the Baptist 
associations of the State. The Board of Missions was organized for the 
purpose of evangelizing the un-evangelized in North Carolina and train- 
ing them for service in the Kingdom of God. 

In doing the above work it is doing what Jesus commanded his dis- 
ciples to do when he said to them ''Go ye therefore and teach all nations 
baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son, and of the 
Holy Ghost; Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have 
commanded you. ' ' 

The work of the State Mission Board is the work of every Baptist 
in the State^ and not the work of the men who compose the Board 
alone. The task was never greater than it is today, nor the need more 
urgent. North Carolina is numbered among the most progressive 
States in the Union from an industrial and educational view point, of 
Avhich every man and woman in the State should feel proud. But we 
must not forget the fact that our prosperity has enlarged our oppor- 
tunity and increased our responsibility. 

The Board of Missions has seven departments of work. 1st, Evangel- 
ism. This Avill always be our first work. Last year's figures, 1,621 con- 
versations, 1,004 baptisms. By letter 1,176. The number of baptisms 
drops again, but if the plans of the 75-Million Campaign were carried 
out this year's figures should show an upward turn. 

2nd, Church Building. Where the gospel draws the people together for 
fellowship and worship and work in any communitj^ a house becomes 
necessary. Our Board expected to be able to spend $10,000 in this 
work this year. 

3rd, Colportage, which has done a great service in placing in the 
hands of our people Baptist literature of all kinds. 

4th, Mobile Schools, with the work on a five year plan has been 
doing a splendid work. 

5th, Women 's Missionary Union. 

6th, B. Y. P. U. 

7th, Sunday Schools. 

The three last departments are so well reported elsewhere we will 
not go into details. God's first harvest in the 75-Million Campaign is 
nearly here and since only a small part of ihe 75-Million Campaign 
fund goes to State Missions, it is highly important that this fund be 
collected promptly as it falls due. By October 31st we shall have 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 17 



material evidences of how far God led us spiritually in the glorious 
experiences of last year. 

In many respects we are closing the greatest year in our State Mis- 
sion work. 

With approximately 300,000 white Baptists organized in around 2,500 
churches within our State we are in a position, as never before, to at- 
tempt even greater things for the kingdom of God in the coming year. 

Eespectfully, 

WALTER M. WILLIAMS. 

EEPORT ON ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONS 

The State Board of Missions has co-operated in a splendid way in 
extending the mission work within our bounds, they having appropriated 
an amount equal to that exx)ended by your local Committee. 

Eight churches were aided during the year and we submit a partial 
report of the work done: 

Lakewood: Rev. Wallace Hartsell, Pastor, contributed to current ex- 
penses $3,233.92, for S. F. M. Campaign $1,000.00, Baptised 12. 

Hillsboro, Efland and Mars Hill, Rev. S. W. Oldham, Pastor, to 
current expenses $1,547.00, to S. F. M. Campaign $2,100.00, Baptised 13. 

West Hill, Rev. J. F. McDuffie, Pastor, Current expenses and build- 
ing $7,315.00, Baptised 37. 

Graham, Rev. L. TJ. Weston, Pastor, current expenses $1441.36, 
S. F. M. Campaign $1101.81, Baptised 4. 

Hocutt Memorial and Glencoe, no regular Pastor, current expenses 
$1,342.22, S. F. M. Campaign, $2,528.67, baptised 23. 

Let us pray God's continued blessings upon our Associational 
Mission work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CARL P. NORRIS, 
Chairman, Executive Committee. 

MINISTERIAL RELIEF REPORT 

We rejoice that at last real progress is being made to care for our 
aged and disabled soldiers of the Cross. 

1st. The amounts given directly to cheer and bring needed com- 
forts from grateful hearts to our distinguished servants who have 
builded well and made the present progress possible, is one of the sacred 
tasks that cannot be taken aAvay, but should increase from the bounties 
of a grateful people. No one can realize, but the recipients themselves, 
the pleasure and thankfulness which comes to their hearts in being 
remembered by their own children, though the amount of the gift 
still be small. 

2nd. The Home established in the Southwest, we are told by Dr. 
R. T. Hanks, is answering a blessedness. While only about twenty-five, 
on an average, so far have taken advantage of the comforts of this 
home, yet it is proving such a burden lifting and habitation of rest, 
that it is strikingly evidenced by those who come to abide, even in their 
appearance, in a short period of time. Thus we are fulfilling the law of 
Christ by helping to bear the burdens of his honored ones in their help- 
lessness. May our Father move upon His people to provide such a home 
in the good old North State, where more are called and sent than from 
any other spot on the face of His world. 

3rd. The Seventy-Five Million Campaign was more than worth while 



18 Fifty-first Annual Session 



if it had done nothing more than to boost and place on a solid financial 
basis the Annuity Tund, which now has reached a quarter of a million 
dollars. This will help in some measure to relieve the anxiety of the 
toiling servants in regard to the future of those dependent upon them. 
So now, we can rejoice in actually doing the things so long talked about, 
and Avith more faith pray the Lord of the harvest for more laborers in 
the waiting world field. 

Eespectfully, 

H. G. DOESETT. 

EEPORT ON CHEISTIAN EDUCATION 

The Seventy-five Million Campaign has ushered in the beginning of 
a new era for our Christian schools. The leaders of the campaign wisely 
decided that the schools shall have their proportional part of the funds. 

Our schools have been poorly equipped. There is not room enough 
this year for all who wish to enter, and in several cases pupils have not 
been solicited in view of inadequate housing conditions. The buildings 
have not only been too small, but the physical equipment of the various 
schools has been about as low as could be. Equipment in the way 
of a teaching force has been a problem. The increased salaries of pro- 
fessors will encourage those who remain in their old positions, and when 
new ones are desired and sought a better class of instructors can be se- 
cured. A better physical teaching force will mean much to our schools. 

We have preparatory schools and colleges composing our Christian 
Educational work. Our colleges fill us Avith pride as we look at the 
contribution they have made to the uplift of humanity. But our pre- 
paratory schools are the ones that need our earnest attention. We must 
impress the pupil in the early years or otherwise miss a large harvest 
of unselfish service which we so much need. 

Our whole system of Christian Education is good as far as it goes. 
The fact that a boy or girl has attended a denominational school does 
not necessarily mean that the boy or girl has received a Christian Edu- 
cation. If a boy wishes to become a chemist he studies chemistry. Why 
not study the Bible if he wishes to become a Christian w^orker? In 
short we cannot hope to be educated by mere association. Heretofore 
our boys have attended Wake Forest College and only a small per cent 
have taken any course relating to the Bible. We have many college 
graduates who are ignorant concerning the most general teachings of 
Jesus. Our denominational schools ought to require every student to 
study the Bible or some related subject. Our Christian Education has 
been too materialistic in ideal. Our schools need to keep before the 
public the fact that ideals and not things, are fundamental. 

The schools need our support in more than one way. They need 
our boys and girls, our money, and our prayers. Let us help to make 
our schools Christian in every sense of the word. The world is crying 
for a trained Christian leadership. There are forebodings of outburst 
of bolshevism in our own fair land. Unless capital and labor are re- 
conciled the future looks dark indeed. Nothing else can take the place 
of a trained Christian leadership to interpret the problems of the day 
in terms of the gospel of Jesus. 

Eespectfullv submitted, 

GEOEGE N. HAEWAED. 



Mount Ziox Baptist Association 19 



OEPHANAGE EEPOET 

Prior to 1872 there was no orphanage in all North Carolina. John 
H. Mills^ a big-bodied, big-hearted and big-spirited soul, who was at 
one time connected with the Biblical Eeeorder and traveling up and 
down North Carolina, saw the great need of the fatherless and mother- 
less children, with no home or parental training. Mills had a vision 
and it was to convert what was then known as St, John^s College, an 
inactive Masonic institution, at Oxford, N. C, which was the property of 
the Masonic fraternity in North Carolina, into an orphan 's home. He 
called a number of the fraternity together and the result was, after 
deliberation, the establishment of what is now known as the Oxford 
Orphan Asylum, one of the best-knoAvn institutions in all North Caro- 
lina. Hundreds of good citizens today owe their position in life to this 
beloved institution. The Oxford Orphan Asylum was hedged about 
with limitations for good reasons, and the big-hearted Mills, being 
a Baptist, seeing a similar work needed among his own brotherhood con- 
tinually advocated same at every public gathering. 

In 1885 or thereabout our Thomasville Orphanage was established 
as the result of Mills ' vision, and under the wise leadership of such men 
as John H. Mills, J. B. Boone and M. L. Kesler, this institution has 
become a mighty power to foster and train both mentally and spiritually 
the Baptist homeless of North Carolina. More than two thousand home- 
less children and many of them gone out through its gates are to-daj' 
occupying responsible positions all over this land. If every man and 
woman in North Carolina would stand with uncovered head on the 
grounds at the Orphanage and see the children with their usual daily 
duties, it would bleach their souls. No institution in all our state gets 
quite so close to its citizenship as the Orphanage, and let us thank God 
for it. The cost to support one child is about fifty cents per day and the 
estimated cost to support more than four hundred at Thomasville is 
around $90,000.00 per year. But what of the cost compared with the 
results; bodies cleansed, minds trained and hearts cheered, and the 
citizenship of North Carolina greatly benefitted. Let us rally to and 
around our beloved Orphanage, one and all, 

Eespectfullv, 

L, G, COLE, 

SUNDAY SCHOOL EEPOET 

There was never a time Avlien we needed to emphasize the work of 
every religious agency so much as now. Our Sunday school work has 
such large possibilities in winning the lost to Christ and training the 
saved for efficient service that we cannot afford to treat it lightly. 

Southern Baptists have undertaken a great Sunday school program. 
As one of the features of the 75-Million Campaign our Sunday school 
Board, with, the Campaign workers, have outlined for us a great chal- 
lenging task, therefore, we, in our Association, commit ourselves to the 
following policies for next year and the j'ears following. 

First, Enlargement. There are at least 500,000 people in North 
Carolina unreached by any Sunday school, for whom white Baptists are 
responsible, if we do only our proportionate part of reaching the un- 
reached. We commend the religious census as the best waj^ of per- 
forming this task effectively. 

Second, Adequate organization and equipment are necessary if we 
are going properly to take care of these people and those already en- 
rolled. This means that our workers must learn how to group, or grade, 



20 Fifty-first Annual Session 



our pupils into the right kind of classes and departments. Then again, 
we must not forget the physical equipment that will at least meet mini- 
mum educational standards. We must provide class rooms, suitable 
seats, maps, black boards, etc. 

Third, Teacher training is a basal necessity in such an hour as 
this. Our Sunday School Board is urging our people so to press this 
work that by 1924 we shall have 150,000 people holding the Normal 
Diploma. This means a great forward movement in our work.- We 
urge the heartiest co-operation on the part of our pastors, officers and 
teachers. 

Fourth, Organized classes are the most effective organizations for 
reaching, training and using the men and women of our churches and 
congregations. No other plan has succeeded so well as this. We com- 
mend the ' ' Organized Class Magazine ' ' as the best periodical available 
for the officers of these classes. 

Fifth, Evangelism should be the main objective in the work of every 
Sunday school. Every year in our Baptist constituency at least 20,000 
children reach the year of accountability. This does not include thou- 
sands and tens of thousands of larger boys and girls and men and 
women who are not saved and yet who must be reached by us if they are 
ever reached for the kingdom. We command a study of the book, 
*' Winning to Christ," by all of our Sunday school workers. 

6. Co-operation with the Sunday school Department of the State 
Mission Board is our duty. This Department stands ready at all times 
to send helpful tracts on practically every phase of Sunday school work. 
These are absolutely free and can be secured from Secretary E. L. 
Middleton, Ealeigh, N. C. He will also aid in every possible way in 
providing Training schools and Institutes for groups of churches in 
cities, towns or country. He urges inquiry from every one has an un- 
solved Sunday school problem. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

S. W. ANDREWS. 

REPOET ON BIBLICAL RECORDER 

For 87 years the Biblical Recorder has been the organ of North 
Carolina Baptists. During all this time it has given its influence to 
the promotion of every department of denominational work. Its 
columns are used freely by the servants of the denomination who have 
charge of our institutions and varied enterprises. 

The paper is true to its name. It is biblical in its teachings and 
records the acts of North Carolina Baptists from week to week. It 
stands for the truth as Baptists hold and interpret it and is always 
ready to go to the defense of our great principles when necessity de- 
mands it. 

But the Recorder is more than a denominational organ. It is a 
family paper as well. Its columns carry wholesome matter into the 
family circle. It takes note of current events and publishes a digest 
of the most important things that occur during the week. News letters 
from the churches are a very important and helpful feature of the paper 
and the news note page gives in pithy paragraphs the doings of our 
great Baptist family. The last page in the Recorder is for the home 
and great care is taken in selecting matter for this page. 

The Recorder is owned by a joint stock company. It was organized 
at the request of the Convention 20 years ago to own and publish 
the paper. But while it is under private ownership, a committee of 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 21 



seven appointed by the Convention acting ^vith the seven directors when 
the election of an editor is necessary. This puts the selection of the 
editor practically in the hands of the Convention, 

" The directors found it absolutely necessary to raise the price of the 
paper on August 1st to $2.50. They regretted very deeply the necessity 
which forced them to take this step. But the two alternatives were to 
increase the price or to reduce the size. The Eecorder was not making- 
expenses at $2.00 a j-ear. Most of the papers raised the price to 
$2.50 before the Recorder took this step. The directors promised sacred- 
ly that as soon as conditions warrant them in going back to the old price 
they will do so. 

The Eecorder management has made a proposition to the churches 
which will make it possible for them to keep the price at $2.00 per 
year. If a church will put the Eecorder in three-fourths of the resi- 
dent families and send the name of the one in each family to whom 
the paper is to be sent, together with a check to cover the amount of 
subscription, the paper will be sent to each individual as at present for 
$2.00 a year. If a church finds it more convenient to pay in monthly 
or ciuarterly installments, the management will accept that method of 
payment. 

A good many churches are putting the Eecorder in the budget. A 
collection is taken for the Eecorder fund just as is done for State mis- 
sions, or any other object, and the paper is sent to the ones whose names 
are forAvarded. If a church shall adopt the budget plan and see that 
the Eecorder goes into 75 per cent of the homes the subscription i)rice 
will be $2.00. 

The Eecorder is essential to the progress of our Avork and it exerts a 
very wholesome influence in the home. We earnestly urge our churches 
to accept the liberal offer made by the management and secure the paper 
at $2.00 per year. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

J. J WAED. 

EEPOET OX BAPTIST YOUXG PEOPLE'S UXIOX WOEK 

The enlistment, development and training of our young people for 
Christian service is of paramount importance. It is important for their 
sakes, for the sake of the Church of Christ today and for the promotion 
of the Kingdom of Christ in the days that are to come. The wisest. 
Christian statesmanship lies in winning, enlisting and equipping our 
young people. In our Baptist churches there seems to be no agency or 
department that does this work as does the B. Y. P. U. The oldest man 
and woman in the church, as well as the boy and girl, young man and 
woman, have reason to encourage and promote Baptist Young People's 
Union work. 

As officers of the churches, teachers in Bible schools, Missionaries of 
the Cross, Ministers of the Gospel, or in unofficial capacities, mam- are 
laboring today who received their earlier impulse and training in local 
B. Y. P. U. organizations. 

During the past year the Seventj-Five Million Campaign called 
strongly upon these young people and their response was valuable and 
noble. 

In our Mount Zion Association the work has been given added 
impetus by the B. Y. P. JJ. State Convention which was held in Durham 
in the summer. Unions in this section have caught new visions and are 
reaching for the Al standard and for larger service. They will answer 
the call to go out and demonstrate the work of the Union and help ir 



22 Fifty-first Annual Session 



organizing where no Union exists. October 10th to 17th has been desig- 
nated B. Y. P. U. Extension Week in the South. Why should not a 
Union be established in each of the fifty and more churches of our As- 
sociations f 

Bro. J. D. Moore wrought well as State B. Y, P. U. Secretary. 
Now that he is in another branch of our denominational work, Bro. 
Perry Morgan, of Dunn, is throwing his talents and his life into the 
work. 

The suggestion is made that there be an Associational organization 
of the Baptist Young People's Unions. This would tend to unify, stand- 
ardize and vitalize this work in and through the churches of the Asso- 
ciation. The opportunity is large. Only twenty-two Unions from the 
Mount Zion Association reported to the Convention last June. 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. W. ROGERS. 

REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK 

The recent adoption of the Susan B. Anthony amendment to our 
Constitution contemplated the political emancii)ation of women, but even 
its most ardent supporters did not, I believe, intend that it should re- 
move all other burdens from the shoulders of the fair sex. However, 
it has apparently had the effect in the present instance of permitting 
them to shift a responsible duty to a lone bachelor, who is less informed 
perhaps, about woman's work than any other man in the Association. 
My detachment from the sources of this information has made it neces- 
sary for me to make inquiry, and I am happy to report that the good 
women gladly placed in my possession the following facts which I now 
present to this Association upon the subject of Women's Work during 
the past year. 

During the Seventy-Five Million Campaign, the women gave more 
than one-fifth of the amount pledged by this Association ; and in the 
raising of our quota the unceasing and unselfish work of our women was 
the greatest factor in this wonderful accomplishment. 

In all but five of the fifty churches of the Association there are 
active Missionary Societies. 

Perhaps the most inspiring item that shall be reported during this 
Association is the fact that as a part of the woman's work, two of our 
consecrated and talented young women, namely Miss Victoria Ferguson 
of the Temple Baptist Church, of Durham, and Miss Grace Olive, 
whose family is so prominently identified with this Association, and 
who comes from Olives Chapel, have consecrated their lives to the 
service of the Master and are now students at the Training school for 
Young Women at Louisville, Ky. 

It is claimed that the past year of the Woman 's Work has been the 
most successful in the history of Mount Zion Association. More em- 
phasis has been placed upon the higher things of life, and more effort 
has been exerted in the winning of souls in the Master's cause. 

As to the future, it is undoubtedly true that the recent entry of 
women upon a wider field of the Avorld 's affairs Avill prepare and en- 
courage them to enter more actively into all the affairs that promote civic 
and social uplift as well as the religious sentiments of our people; and 
this will mean intensified Christian activity on their part. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. H. SYKES. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 23 



EEPOET ON TEMPERANCE 

We perhaps have paid too little attention to this matter of intoxi- 
cating liquors. We have thought the matter settled and are about to be 
rudely and harshly awakened to find it different. 

Prohibition, so far as the law is concerned, has made rapid progress 
and we are not suffering for lack of funds to support our public schools 
because Ave do not get taxes out of it, but in reality nothing does or 
can make progress save as it does so in the minds of the people. The 
progress wished for by a part of our church members is not evident in 
fact. Some of our churches are torn in sunder by the sentiment in 
favor of illicit distilleries. We need to look the matter squarely in the 
face and meet the issue. In our own Association there has been still 
after still taken and yet the moonshine business goes on. 

We need to give the matter our attention for more than one reason. 
For economic reasons. There was seized and destroyed, in the first 
six months of this year, property equal in value to more than half the 
amount asked of our Association for all objects of benevolence in five 
years to come. The exact amount was $173,928, an amount equal to 
almost double the amount of all moneys handled by all the churches of 
our Association during the year 1919. In this destruction were hundreds 
of bushels of corn, thousands of pounds of sugar, and thousands of 
gallons of molasses. 

For the sake of society. There Avere taken 1,285 distilleries. Let 
it take only two men to operate them and you will have 2,570 men 
giving their time to it, not to speak of those Avho use the product. 
These men paid out $600,518 in taxes and penalties that ought to have 
gone to the support of their families. As large as these figures are yet 
Mr. Bailey says the business is ''on the increase" and ''is alarming." 
One section of our Association has the name of being the Avorst in all 
the world. There is no force equal to the sentiment of our churches. 
In the name of all that Christ stood for, lived for, and died for, let us 
create a sentiment against this soul destroying business. 

W. HAETSELL. 

EEPOET OF J. N. CHEEK, TEEASUEEE OF MOUNT ZION 
ASSOCIATION 

AMOUNTS EECEIVED FEOM CHUECHES AND 
FINANCE COMMITTEE FOE: 

Foreign Missions $ 103.50 

Home Missions 81.71 

State Missions 121.65 

Association Missions 1,046.63 

Sunday School Missions 56.79 

Christian Education 120.00 

Ministers Eelief 122.46 

Minute Fund 161.65 

Orphanage 158.56 

On hand last report 853.52— $2,826.47 

DISBUESEMENTS 

Foreign Missions : $ 123.72 

Home Missions 116.78 

State Missions 150.76 



24 Fifty-first Annual Session 



Association Missions 1,435.30 

Sunday School Missions 75.09 

Christian Education 153.00 

Ministers Belief 152.46 

Minute Fund 179.20 

Orphanagej 216.12 

Balance on hand 224.04 — $2,826.47 

Eespectfully submitted, 

E. T. HOWERTON, 

Auditor. 

REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE 
We, your Finance Committee, beg leave to make the following report: 

Minute Fund $198.90 

Associational Missions '. 204.20 

75 Million Campaign 108.50 

Orphanage 25.07 

Education 22.33 

Ministers Relief 13.00 

Hospitals 7.00 



$579.00 
Respectfully submitted, 
W. E. YOUNG, 
WALTER M. WILLIAMS, 
B. W. ROGERS. 



PART III 

TABULATED REPORTS 






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P^a2t>H 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE MT. ZION ASSOCIATION 



PLACE OF 
MEETING 



MODERATOR 



CLERK 



1870 
1871 

1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 



Mount Moriah- 
Mount Pisgah. 

Antioch 

Durham 

Lystra 

Cane Creek 



1876|Mount Hermon.. 

1877 Olive Chapel. 

1878 Bethel _ 

1879 Graham 

1880 Durham :. 

1881 Mount Gilead 

1882 Moore's Chapel... 

1883 Mount Pisgah..... 

1884 Chapel Hill 

1885 Sandy Level 

1886 Cedar Fork.. 

1887 Rose of Sharon. 
1888 1 Mount Carmel... 

1889|Berea 

1890 1 Red Mountain.... 

1891 1 Cane Creek 

1892 I Olive Chapel 

1893|BurHngton 

1894|Mount Moriah.... 

1895|Bethesda 

1896|Mount Gilead 

1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 



Berry's Grove. 

Antioch 

Mount Pisgah.. 

Graham 

Lystra 

East Durham... 

1903 I Cane Creek 

19041 Cedar Fork 

1905|Swepsonvillo 

19061 Bethel 

1907|Qlive Chapel.... 

1908 I Burlington 

1909jMars Hill 

1910|Bells 

1911|Berea 

1912 I Red Mountain. 



Mebane 

Yates 

Cross Roads 

Carrboro 

1917 1 Lowe's Grove.... 

1918 1 No Meeting 

191 9 1 Mount Hermon. 



1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 



Rev. G. W. Purefoy... 
Rev. G. W. Purefoy... 
Rev. John C. Wilson. 
Rev. John C. Wilson. 
Rev. John C. Wilson. 
Rev. John C. Wilson. 
Rev. John C. Wilson. 
Rev. John C. Wilson. 

Rev. J. P. Mason 

Rev. J. P. Mason 

Rev. J. P. Mason 

Rev. J. P. Mason. 

Rev. J. P. Mason 

Rev. J. P. Mason 

Rev. J. P. Mason.. 

Rev. John C. Wilson. 
Rev. John C. Wilson. 
Rev. John C. Wilson. 
Rev. John C. Wilson. 

A. B. Roberson 

W. A. Albright 

W. A. Albright 

W. A. Albright 

W. A. Albright 

Rev. J. L. Carroll 

Rev. O. C. Horton 

Rev. O. C. Horton 

Rev. O. C. Horton 

Rev. O. C. Horton 

Rev. O. C. Horton..... 

T. B. Parker 

T. B. Parker 

T. B. Parker 

T. B. Parker 

T. B. Parker 

T. B. Parker 

Rev. C. J. Thompson. 
Rev. C. J. Thompson. 

Rev. W. C. Barrett 

Rev. W. C. Barrett 

Rev. W. C. Barrett 

C. P. Norris 

C. P. Norris 

C. P. Norris 

C. P. Norris 

W. R. L. Smith 

J. F. McDuffie 

J. F. McDuffie 

J. F. McDuffie 

J. F. McDuffie 



H 


M 


. C. Stroud 


H 


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. C. Stroud 


H 


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. C. Stroud 


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. C. Stroud 


H 


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Chas. C. Smith. 



PLEDGES FOR 1921 



On the basis of $200.00 a year for Benevolences, or $1,000.00 for the first 
year j)eriod of the Seventy-five Million Campaign, the apportionments for the 
various objects is as follows : 



Education $53.54 

Foreign Missions 53.54 

Home Missions 32.00 

State Missions 26.51 



Associational Missions $ 6.62 

Ministerial Relief 10.00 

Orphanage 12.53 

Hospital 5.67 



If a church's apportionment, or pledge, is $400.00 a year, the above amounts 
may be easily doubled, etc. 

Send Associational Missions to J. N. Cheek, Treasurer, Durham, N. C. 



CONSTITUTION 



Article 1. This Association shall be called Mount Zion Baptist 
Association. 

Art. 2. The Association shall meet annually on Tuesday after the 
second Sunday in October, and be composed of the ordained ministers 
belonging to, and members chosen annually by the several churches be- 
longing to this body, who by presenting letters from their respective 
churches certify their appointment, shall be entitled to seats. 

Art. 3. The number of delegates from each church shall be three, 
and one additional delegate from each Sabbath School connected with 
that church, Avho shall be a member of some Baptist Church. 

Art. 4, The letters from the churches shall state the number bap- 
tized, received by letter, restored, dismissed by letter, excluded and died 
during the past year, the total ]iumber in fellowship, and the amount 
paid as pastor's salary, incidental expenses, minute fund, for the poor. 
State, Foreign, Home Missions, Educational, Baptist Orphanage, Sab- 
bath School, Old Ministers' Eelief, Associational Missions and such 
other information as may be deemed necessary for publication. 

Art., 5. The members thus convened shall sit as an advisory council, 
who shall have no power to infringe on any of the internal rights of the 
churches. 

Art. 6. In all their discussions and acts, this Association shall rec- 
ognize Christ as the only law-giver in Zion, and that every individual 
church is an independent body. 

Art. 7. It^ shall be the dutj' of this Association when requested by 
aggrieved members to hear their grievances, give appropriate advice, or 
send committees to aid them in their difficulties. If the minority of the 
church is aggrieved with the majority, upon application they shall be 
entiled to the same consideration. Individual applicants will not be 
entertained. 

Art. 8. The Association shall have power to withdraw from any 
church that shall knowingly or wilfully depart from the orthodox prin- 
ciples of the religion as taught in the Bible and held by the regular 
Baptists as the true teachings thereof. 

Art. 9. The officers of this Association shall be: A Moderator, a 
Vice-Moderator, a Clerk, a Treasurer, a Historian, and an Auditor. 

Art. 10. All of the officers of this Association shall be elected an- 
nually bj' ballot. 

Art. 11. The Clerk shall keep a faithful record of its proceedings 
and have the minutes published and distributed to the churches accord- 
ing to the amount paid by each for such object. He shall be paid 
fifty ($50.00) dollars out of the minute fund for his Avork. 

Art. 12. The Historian shall collect and put in some durable form 
all facts of interest about each of the churches and report at each 
session of this body. 

Art. 13. The Treasurer shall receive and pay over to the proper 
parties all the monej' contributed by the churches and make an annual 
report to the Association. 

Art. 14. The Auditor shaU annually examine the Treasurer's books 
and see that they are kept in an intelligent, business-like way, and at- 
test the report. 



34 Fifty-first Annual Session 



Art. 15. This Association shall be an auxiliary to the Baptist State 
Convention in all Educational, Mission, Sunday School and other work. 

Art. 16. Baptist Churches on application for admission to this body 
shall be received and their delegates seated, if necessary evidence is 
given that they are truly of our faith and order. 

Art. 17. Amendments to this Constitution may. be made at any an- 
nual meeting, two -thirds of the members concurring. 

Art. 18. There shall be an Executive Committee of nine members to 
which shall be entrusted the work of planning and directing the mis- 
sionary activities within the bounds of the Association; to carry into 
effect the decisions of this body, when necessary or not otherwise pro- 
vided for, and to act for the Association during the interregnum be- 
tween Associational sessions. 

The Committee shall be elected in groups of three each, as follows: 
one group to serve for three years, three to serve for two years, and 
three fat' one year. Thereafter three members to be elected annually as 
the term of each group shall expire. 

Art. 19. The Associational year shall begin on October first and 
close on September thirtieth. 



PART IV 
MINUTES OF THE 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 



The fifteenth annual session of the W. M. TJ. of the Mt. Zion 
Association met with the Woman's Missionary Society of Olive's Chapel 
Baptist Church on the 5th of October, 1920/ 

The Superintendent, JNIrs. C. L. Haywood, presided, and opened the 
meeting by having the audience sing a hyuui. 

Mrs. T. M. Green, of West Durliam, conducted the devotional exer- 
cises, using for the Scripture reading John 15:1-16. She spoke of 
Christ 's work on earth as having a three-fold purpose, that of preaching, 
teaching and healing. 

The Association was welcomed by Mrs, E. L. Goodwin, and in the 
absence of Mrs. E. L. Stone, Mrs. E. Walton responded. 

Mrs. Haywood next made her annual report. She gave a review 
of a splendid year's work, and spoke of what great things God had 
Avrought for and through us. She also had something to say about the 
Union 's motto : * ' That in all Things He Might Have the Pre-eminence. ' ' 
Special mention was made of Miss Victoria Ferguson, of Durham, 
and Miss Grace Olive, of Olive's Chapel who are now in the Training 
School preparing themselves for special Christian work. Mount Zion 
Association feels proud and honored that God has called two of its 
members into this work. 

The Association then had the pleasure and honor of hearing Mrs. 
W. N. Jones, of Ealeigh, our State W. M. U. president, in a most 
interesting and earnest address. Always good, Mrs. Jones was at her 
very best at this time. She spoke of some of the points in the Standard 
of Excellence, making special mention of Mission Study. She stressed 
the need of real Bible study and devotion and thorough preparation 
of programs in our meetings. All the women were urged to be steAvards 
in every sense of the Avord, at all times, thereby making the AvatcliAvord 
of the Union our individual watchword : ' ' That in all Things He 
Might Have the Pre-eminence." Col: 1-18. 

Song, ''Holy Spirit Faithful Guide," Avas sung. 

Eoll Call of Societies Avith tAA-enty-five (25) churches represented 
.A'ith seventy-eight (78) delegates present, and a very large number of 
visitors. The reports from all societies AA-ere very good and very en- 
couraging. 

The President then appointed the f olloAAing committees : Obituary, 
Time and Place, Besolutions. 

Song by the congregation. We AA-ere led in prayer by Mrs. W. X. 
Jones, and the morning session adjourned. During the noon hour, the 
ladies of Olive's Chapel served a delicious and bountiful dinner. 

The afternoon session AA'as opened AA-ith song ' ' I Am Thine Oh Lord. ' ' 

Devotions Avere led by Miss Crutchfield, of Temple Church. She 
read Eonians 12th chapter, stressing 12th verse, speaking of the three 
states in Avhich a Christian should be: state of hope, patience, prayer. 
Prayer by Mrs. M. W. Buck. 



36 Fifty-first Annual Session 



The Sunbeams of Olive's Chapel delightfully entertained us with 
songs and recitations. It was a splendid demonstration of the Sun- 
beam work. 

The nominating committee was elected from the floor, and asked 
to retire. 

At this time, Mrs. Eoberts, the wife of the new pastor at Mebane, 
was introduced to the congregation. 

A motion was made that we send loving greetings to Mrs. E. L. 
Baskin, .of Chapel Hill, who Avas unable to meet with us. Mrs. Buck 
and Mrs. C. C. Smith were asked to do this. 

Mrs. C. C. Smith, the Y. W. A. superintendent, called the roll of 
Y. W. A. 's, and the delegates present responded with reports. Mrs. W. 
N. Jones gave an interesting talk on Y. W. A. work. 

The Associational Progress fund amounting to $38.67 was received 
at this time. 

Mrs. W. J. Crain favored us with a beautiful solo : ' ' In the Secret 
of His Presence. ' ' 

Mrs. M. W. Buck gave an interesting report on the Mobile School, 
held in Burlington in July. 

Personal Service Avas discussed by Miss Eymer, of Edgemont 
Church. She referred us to MatthcAv 25:35-36 and urged us to report all 
personal service Avork. Mrs. Buck gave interesting suggestions on get- 
ting personal service Avork reiDorted in her society. Mrs. Jones also gave 
some helpful suggestions. 

Echoes from the State meeting in Shelby Avere given by Mrs. E. T. 
IIoAverton, Jr., of Durham. 

Echoes from the S. B. C. convention in Washington Avere given by 
Miss Jinks, of East Durham. 

The committees then gave their reports. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

We, the nominating committee, recommend the folloAving names as 
officers for the coming year, viz.. Superintendent, Mrs. C. L. Hay- 
Avood; Assistant Superintendent, Mrs. M. W. Buck; Leader of Y. 
W. A. and G. A., Miss Josie Eymer; Leader of Sunbeams and E. A., 
Mrs. E. L. Baskin; Secretary and Treasurer, Mrs. V. C. Garrard. 
Eespectfully submitted, 

MISS SALLIE EIGSBEE, 
MES. W. S. OLIVE, 
MES. E. WALTON, 
MISS EOSA PATTEESON, 
MES. WM. J. CEAIN. 

OBITUAEY COMMITTEE 

With sorroAv and loving tenderness, Ave record the home going of 
some of our co-Avorkers in Mt. Zion Association, Avho have labored 
most faithfully and lovingly AAdth us and have entered upon rich reAvards. 
During the past year Ave haA^e sustained losses of: Mrs. J. G. Eigsbee, 
LakcAvood Church. Mrs. L. C. Woods, Temple Church, Mrs. Walter 
Wilson and Mrs. E. X. Eearington, Bell's Church, Mrs. GoodAvin and 
Mrs. Wagner, Olive's Chapel, Mrs. E. F. Williams, Burlington, Mrs. 
Lonnie Clark and Mrs. Ellen Clark, North Durham, Mrs. Effie FoAvler, 
Antioch, Miss Lula Eeams, First Baptist, Mrs. Arthelia Williams, Mrs. 
Geo. Young, Mrs. C. J. Byrd, East Durham. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 37 

Eesolved, (1) That we thank God for the lives of these consecrated 
women, for their influence will long be felt among us. 

(2) We extend our sympathy to the bereaved families and to the 
societies in which these friends worked. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. V. C. GARRARD, 
MRS. J. T. CHRISTIAN, 
MRS. SELLARS. 

COMMITTEE ON TIME AND PLACE 
We, the committee on Time and Place, recommend that we meet 
with Chapel Hill Society on Tuesday after the 1st Sunday in September, 
1921. 

Respectfully submitted, 
MRS. G. A. GENTRY, 
MISS ANNA BELLE DURHAM, 
MRS. K. U. BRYAN. 

COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS 

All reports were adopted at the time of their reading. A motion 
was made that the Secretary write letters of greetings from the Mt. 
Zion Association to our two girls, Miss Victoria Ferguson, of Temple 
Church, and Miss Grace Olive, of Olive's Chapel who are in the Training 
School at Louisville; also to Miss Cora Lee Cannon, of West Durham, 
who is in Buie 's Creek Academy, i)reparing herself to enter the Train- 
ing School. 

The meeting came to a close with tlie singing of ' * Blest be the Tie 
That Binds." Mrs. G. N. Harward, of Yates Church offered the closing 
prayer. 

The meeting as a whole was both interesting and profitable. 
We regret that Mrs. Weston Bruner, and Mrs. R. N. Simms, of 
Raleigh, who were to have been with us, could not be present. 

MRS. C. L. HAYWOOD, 

Superintendent. 
MRS. V. C. GARRARD, 
MRS. K. U. BRYAN, 

Secretaries Pro-Tem. 



m 



\ 



QllllllllHIIHIIIIIIIIinilllllllllllllllllHiriHIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllUH 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

FIFTY-SECOND ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 




HELD WITH 

BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH 

ORANGE COUNTY, N. C. 

OCTOBER 11-13, 1921 



The next session 'will be held with Rose of Sharon Church, Tuesday and 
Wednesday, after the second Sunday in October, 1922 



oiiiiiinuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiHiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimo 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

FIFTY-SECOND ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 




HELD WITH 

BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH 

ORANGE COUNTY, N. C. 

OCTOBER 11-13, 1921 



The next session 'will be held with Rose of Sharon Church, Tuesday and 
Wednesday, after the second Sunday in October, 1922 



'^iM^lcyii (fy 






■M. ^' 



liM mH i^-' 



\fUu^ 






OFFICERS 



W. S. OLIVE, Moderator Apex 

W. M. WILLIAMS, Vice-Moderator Burlington 

W. O. WILLIAMS, Clerk Durham 

J. N. CHEEK, Treasurer Durham 

E. T. HOWEETON, Auditor Durham 

J. F. McDUEFIE, Historian Chapel Hill 



OEDAINED MINISTEES HOLDING CHUECH MEMBEESHIP IN 
ASSOCIATION 

Aitfejmaf^^,. - L Chicago, 111. Kimiett, A. D Wake Forest 

y-Baskin, E. L Chapel Hill Lennon, E. S Haw Eiver 

Brinson, H. F East Durham McDuffie, J. F Chapel Hill 

» Buck, Martin W Burlington i^Norville Durham /'\ 

/ Gr-ad n , W m^^„.„... .^...Durham Oldham, S. W. Hillsboro fO-^-**^"^ 

Ga ^WLll e .' H Merry Oaks ; Olive, W. S Apex, E. 3 

Cox, E. E West Durham Overby, L. W West Durham ,1 ,. 

^ ^Davis, J. B Carrboro 3 B0e,-E. D., ThiD Durham jA-CCt'^L:, 

^ Dorsett, H. Grady Carrboro Eoberis,- P-; A., Th.D Mebane 

w^ Dean, E. C Burlington Eoss, -Olarence Cincinnati, O. 

'^Green, Thos. M West Durham Ston^..-.- Apex, E. 4 

^ Harward, Geo. N.... Durham Welsh, J. Elwood, Th.D Durham 

ry, ' Harts e H ' ; — Wallae e- . . ■ .t . t ".tyrDa rfiam 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Martin W. Buck, W. E. Young, L. G. Cole, to serve three years each; 
C. P. Norris, J. Elwood Welsh, H. F, Brinson, to serve two years each; 
T. M. Green, J. C. Markham, S. W. Andrews to serve one year each. 

COMMITTEE WOEDEE OF BUSINESS 
Martin W. Buck, E. L. Baskin, J. Elwood Welsh. 

MESSENGEES 

To Southern Baptist Convention — H. F. Brinson. 
To Baptist State Convention — T. M, Green. 

EEPOETS FOE NEXT SESSION 
Subject Reported hy Discussed hy 

/ Associational Missions .Ch'm Executive Com 

/State Missions L. G. Cole E. L. Baskin ^ 

I Foreign Missions E. L. Dean J. Elwood Welsh / 

^ Home Missions S. W. Oldham Wallace Hartsell 

C Orphanage....: B. W. Eogers E. D. Poe 

l^^ Biblical Recorder W. S. -Crawford T. M. Green 

r Ministerial Eelief S. W, Andrews J. B. I^is 

K' Christian Education J. T. Salmon M. W. Buck 

f Sunday Schools C. L. Haywood G. N. Howard 

t Woman's Work Mrs. M. W. Buck H. F. Brinson 

Temperance E. S. Lennon H. G. Dorsett 

B. Y. P. U W. E. Young Clyde Johnson 



ENROLLMENT 



Messengers from the churches enrolled as follows: 

Antioeh — ^A. Ward, Benny Andrews, P. C. Lloyd, L. B. Lloyd. 

Berea — C. E. McHaney. 

Bells — None enrolled. 

Berrys Grove — H. H. Gates, Mrs. H. H. Gates. 

Bethel— Lueco Lloyd, W. V. Andrews, G. Whit Lloyd, J. S. Nevill. 

Bethesda — W. M. Terrell. 

Burlington First — G. H. Gates, Mrs. G. H. Gates, M. W. Buck, 
A. H. King, J. B. Gheek. 

Hocutt Memorial — Jesse Holt, W. M. Williams, Mrs. W, M. Williams, 
Miss Fannie Williams, G. D. Gattis, N. A. Gregg, Mrs. Mamie Durham, 
Miss Eosa Patterson, Miss Mary Gheek, Mrs. W. S. Eay. 

Glencoe— G. T. Faucett, G. L. Murray, G. F. Phillips, Mrs. John 
Gook. 

Gane Greek— J. W. Gheek, J. H. Lloyd. 

Ghapel Hill— G. B. Griffin, S. W. Andrews, Mrs. S. W. Bynum. 

Garrboro — A. L. Andrews, M. W. Sparrow, G. B, Andrews, Norman 
Phillips. 

Gedar Fork— J. H. Shipp, P. H. Page. 

Gross Eoads— E. F. McGauley, W. P. McGauley, A. W. Lloyd. 

Durham, East— J. P. Gates, J. N. Gheek, W. E. Stanley, G. W. 
Stallings, W. E. Young. 

Edgemont — L. V. Byrd, W. B. Eogers, Josie Eymer. 

First— H. G. Barbee, L. G. Gole, E. E. Hurst, E. T. Howerton, W. 
M. Williams. 

Lakewood— L. P. Bassett, W. G. Pendergrass, F. A. Ward. 

Grace— A. P. Tilley. 

Temple — None enrolled. 

West— G. E. Howard, G. B. Lowe, Mrs. Thos. Gates. 

Efland— L. M. Eiley. 

Ebenezer — G. E. Garrard, A. V. Gates, W. J. Williams. 

Ephesus — G. M. Pope, Mrs. G. M. Pope, J. W. Ganady, Maude 
Ganady, Euby King. 

Graham — L. B. Hadley, A. P. Williams, Mrs. J. D. Albright, Mrs. 
E. I. Holmes, Mrs. M. G. Flanigan, Mrs. Fannie Gox, Mrs. J. P. Williams. 

HiUsboro, First— J. M. Garr, P. H. Smith, H. H. Thompson. 

West Hill — J. A. Mayes, Gaston Ghisenhall, Arlie M. Keck. 

Lowes Grove — J. L. Green, P. S. Bunn, Mrs. F. S. Bunn. 

Lystra— J. G. Gheek, W. B. Gheek, E. A. Dollar. 

Mars Hill — J. F. Goleman. 

Mebane — W. S. CraAvford, J. M. Eimmer. 

Merry Oaks — None enrolled. 

Moore's Ghapel — J. M. Gheek, E. F. Moore. 

Mount Ada — None enrolled. 

Mount Garmel — None enrolled. 

Mount Gilead— Z. J. Johnson, W. E. Griffin. 

Mount Hermon — W. H. Garrard. J. D. Whitfield, Mrs. J. D. Whit- 
field. 

Mount Moriah— W. E. GarroU, J. L. Williams, J. T. Gouch, W. H, 
Couch, Miss Mabel Pendergraph. 



Fifty-second Annual Session 



Mount Pisgah — J. B. Harward, T. J. Wilson, A. L. Markhain, 
H. B. Barbee, H. M. Lewter. 

Olive Branch — K. E. Stallings, Miss Kate Nichols, Miss Sadie Stall- 
ings, N. L. Ferrell. 

Olive Chapel— H. T. Lawrence, J. B. Mills, A. T. Olive. 

Pleasant Hill — None enrolled. 

Eed Mountain — W. P. Mangum, T. E. Mangum. 

Eoberson Grove — None enrolled. 

Eose of Sharon— W. P. Newton, W. L. Scott. 

Sandy Level — J. H. Haskins, Miss Vera Watson, Miss Malissa Mark- 
ham. 

Swepsonville — J. E. Frazier, D. F. Williams. 

Yates — Paul Pickett. 

The following pastors in the Association enrolled: T<. L. Baskins, 
H. F. Brinson, Martin W. Buck, C. E. Byrd, Wm. J. Grain, J. B. Davis, 
E. C. Dean, H. G. Dorsett, E. P. Ellington, T. M. Green, Wallace Hart- 
sell, E. S. Lennon, J. F. McDufde, S. W. Oldham, W. S. Olive, E. D. 
Poe, J. Elwood Welsh. 

Note : Doubtless other massengers were present than those in the 
above list, but their enrollment slips failed to get to the clerk. 



PARTI 

PROCEEDINGS 



Bethel Baptist Church, October 11, 1921. 

The fifty-second session of the Mount Zion Baptist Associaion was 
called to order at 10:00 o'clock, A.M., by Moderator Eev. W. S. Olive. 
Devotional exercises were conducted by Wm. J. Grain, of Durham. 

Martin W. Buck reported on order of business. The report was 
adopted. For enrollment of delegates, tellers were appointed and 69 
messengers were reported as enrolled. The Association then proceeded to 
elect officers. Eev. W. S. Olive, of Apex, was re-elected Moderator; 
Walter M, Williams, of Burlington, was re-elected Vice-Moderator; W. 
O. Williams, of Durham, was elected Clerk ; J. N. Cheek, of East Durham, 
was re-elected Treasurer, and J. F. McDuffie, of Chapel Hill, was re- 
elected Historian. 

The annual sermon was preached by E. D. Poe, of the Temple Baptist 
Church, Durham, from the text, 1st Samuel 10:26, ''And there went 
with him a band of men, whose heart God had touched, ' ' the theme 
being ' ' God 's heart touch. ' ' 

On motion of Bro. Welsh, a committee to draft a suitable resolution 
as to the disarmament conference, to be held in Washington on November 
11, were appointed by the Moderator, and the following resolution was 
read and adopted: 

''Whereas, the President of the United States has called a conference 
of the Allied Nations and China to meet November 11^ 1921, for the 
purpose of considering the question of the limitation of armament and, 

"Whereas, the Christian people of all denominations are committed 
by their profession of faith in Jesus Christ as the world's Saviour to a 
policy of world-wide peace, therefore, 

"Be it Eesolved, That we the delegates of the Mount Zion Baptist 
Association in Annual Session assembled at Bethel Baptist Church in 
Orange County, North Carolina, this the 12th day of October, do hereby 
endorse the action of the President of the United States in calling for 
a conference on the limitation of armament, and pray God's blessings 
to rest upon the delegates to this conference in every honest sincere 
effort put forth to reduce the armament of the world. ' ' 
J. ELWOOD WELSH, 

First Baptist Church, Durham, N, C. 
MAETIN W. BUCK, 

Firs Batptist Church, Burlington, N. C. 
S. W. ANDEEWS, 

First Baptist Church, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Committee. 

The following visitors were recognized by the Association: Herman 
T. Stevens, Home Mission Board; Chas. E. Maddry, Corresponding 
Secretary; W. Y. Quisenberry^ Foreign Mission Board; Wade D. 
Bostic, Missionary to China; Archibald Johnson, Editor Biblical Recorder. 
G. C. Smith, A. B. Lynch, F. A. Betts, Evangelist Singers, and W. A. 
Crabtree, from the Sandy Creek Association. 

The association then adjourned for the dinner hour. 



Fifty-second Annual Session 



AFTERNOON SESSION 

Devotional exercises were conducted by Rev. T. M. Green, of West 
Durham. 

The Moderator appointed the Finance Committee as follows : J. N. 
Cheek, Walter M. Williams and A. T. Olive. 

The report on the Biblical Eecorder was presented by L. G. Cole 
and after discussion by L.. G., Cole and Archibald Johnson, the editor, 
the report was adopted. 

The report on Ministerial Relief was reported by J. T. Salmon and was 
adopted after discussion by S. W. Andrews and Chas. E. Maddry. 

The report on Foreign Mission was reported by Walter M. Williams 
and discussed by Wallace Hartsell, Wade D. Bostic and W. Y. Quisen- 
berry, was adopted. 

The report on Home Missions was read by H. G. Dossett and dis- 
cussed by J. E, Welsh, Ruben Shipp and Herman T. Stevens. Adopted. 

F. H. Page, H. T. Lawrence, L. G. Cole, S W. Andrews and C. H. 
Gates were appointed to constitute the Committee on Place and Preacher 
for the next session of the Association. 

The Association then adjourned to meet 10:00 o'clock tomorrow 
morning. 

MORNING SESSION— WEDNESDAY 

The Association was called to order by the Moderator. Devotional 
services conducted by Rev. H. F. Brinson, of East Durham. 

The following committees Avere announced by the Moderator: Com- 
mittee to Nominate the Executive Committee, H. G. Dossett, Reuben 
Shipp and R. O. Gates; To nominate Messengers to the Southern Baptist 
Convention, Parham Smith, W. E. Young and T. H. Lawrence; To 
Nominate Messengers to the Baptist State Convention, R. T. Howerton, 
T. M. Green and J. T. Salmon. 

The report on State Missions was read by S. W. Oldham and dis- 
cussed by Chas. E. Maddry and adopted. 

The report on Christian Education was made by W. S. Crawford, 
discussed by Dr. W. L. Poteat, President of Wake Forest College. 
Report adopted. 

Communication from Rev. Ira E. D. Andrews was read and a telegram 
in answer to the communication was sent by the Moderator. 

A letter was requested to be sent to Rev. C, C. Smith, Brevard, N. C, 
our former Clerk : 

' ' Dear Brother : At the meeting of the Mount Zion Association, held at 
Bethel Church, the Association instructed me to send you our affection- 
ate greetings and best wishes for a happy and useful pastorate in your 
new field of labor. The brethren and sisters of the Association will not 
soon forget your work among them, especially during the eventful days 
of two years ago. 

''Our prayer and hope for you is that you may be richly blessed of 
God and abundantly used of Him for many years to come." 

J. ELWOOD WELSH. 

J. P. Carter, evangelist singer, was introduced to the Association. 
The Association then adjourned for the dinner hour. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 



AFTERNOON SESSION 

Devotional exercises were conducted by Rev. R. P. Ellington^ of 
Graham. 

Orphanage reported by B. W. Rogers and discussed by General 
Manager Kesler, of the Orphanage, and was adopted. 

Associational Missions was reported by T. M. Green and was adopted 
after a discussion by Wallace Hartsell, H. G. Dorsett and R. P. 
Ellington. 

Law and Order in Mount Zion Association was discussed by J. 
Elwood Welsh, Martin W. Buck and Dr. W. L. Poteat. Motion to 
appoint a Committee to Draft Resolutions as to Law and Order in this 
Association; H. F. Brinson, T. M. Green and J. F. McDuf&e, Committee. 

Worldliness in our churches was presented by Martin W. Buck. The 
following resolutions as to worldliness in our churches was read : 

Whereas, it is evident to all serious minded people, that there is a 
wide-spread and growing spirit of worldliness in our churches which is 
a menace to our future and a cause for concern to all who believe in 
the divine mission of our churches; and. 

Whereas, this state of worldliness has aroused the leaders of all 
denominations to call the attention of their people to the alarming danger 
that threatens the very life of our churches, whatever the cause, and 
has led them to attempt to show them the dangers of worldly entangle- 
ments that neutralize their influence for righteousness in their respective 
communities; and. 

Whereas the word of God abounds in warnings, exhortations and 
threatenings against all conformity to the world, so that Ave are warned 
to * ' avoid even the appearance of evil, ' ' commanded to ' ' come out from 
among them" that practice those things that are unbecoming in Chris- 
tians and to live holy, and unblamable lives before the world; and, 

Whereas, the chief causes for serious apprehension we may note the 
disposition to secularize and socialize the Lord's day, also the motion 
picture shows as commonly operated, which are proving an evil because 
of their false and evil appeals, and finally the modern dance with its 
insidious suggestions because of dress, late hours, and improper asso- 
ciations. Therefore be it 

Resolved: 1. That we sincerely and seriously warn the members 
of the churches within the bounds of our association, especially parents, 
to give diligence to training up their children in the way of obedience to 
the letter and spirit of the word of God. 

2. Then Ave warn the members of our churches against the evils 
above enumerated, and especially against the modern dance, as being 
an evil that saps the spirit life of young Christians, and an evil ihat 
brings reproach upon both the professors of religion and upon the 
churches of which they are members. 

3. That Ave most earnestly urge the individual members of our 
churches to sincerely co-operate in the endeavor to elevate the morals 
of our communities by precept and example, and to give heed to the 
teachings of the word of God in our homes, that ' ' our sons may be as 
plants grown up in their youth ' ' and our ' * daughters as cornerstones 
after the similitude of a place." 

4. That Ave recommend that these resolutions be read in every pulpit 
and W. M. S. of our Association as the sentiment of our Association. 



10 Fifty-second Annual Session 



Adopted and two copies to be sent to each church (one for each 
pulpit and one for each W. M. S., also copies be furnished to Durham 
and other secular papers and Biblical Recorder. 

The Executive Committee selected for three years was M. W. 
Buck, W. E. Young and L. G. Cole. 

A constructive program was presented and discussed by E. C. Dean. 

Eeport of Historian, J. F. McDuffiO; followed and was adopted w4th 
special thanks to our Historian. 

Woman's Work, reported by T. M. Green and discussed by Mrs. 
Martin W. Buck; report was adopted and a resolution as to former 
Superintendent, Mrs. C. L, Hayw^ood was read by the Clerk. 

At this time three brothers that were present when the Mount Zion 
Association was formed in 1870 were recognized and in short speeches 
told us of the Association fity-one years ago; W. C. Cole, G. O. Cole 
and C. Whit Lloyd. 

A cash collection for a worthy and sick pastor was taken, amounting 
to $53.00 and was turned over to Bro. Livingston Johnston. 

The Committee on Place and Preacher recommended that the body meet 
with Eose of Sharon Church, and that E. C. Dean, of Burlington, 
preach the annual sermon with J. B. Davis, of Carrboro, as alternate. 

On recommendation of the nominating committee the following 
were elected delegates to the Southern Baptist Convention: H. F. Brin- 
son; delegate to the Baptist State Convention, T. M. Green. 

The Association then adjourned to meet Thursday morning at 10:00 
A. M. 

THUESDAY MOENING SESSION 

The Association was called to order by the Moderator. Devotional 
services Avas led by Eev. H. G. Dorsett. 

Order of Business for the day adopted. Eeport on Temperance 
prepared by J. L. Hester, was read by Bro. Green, and was discussed 
by E. S. Lennon ; report adopted. 

B. Y. P. U. report prepared by E. Clyde Johnson, was read by 
Bro. Welsh, discussed by E. H. Andrews, Wallace Hartsell and T. M. 
Green. Eeport adopted. 

Sunday School Work reported by J. J. Ward^ discussed by J. L. Hes- 
ter W. V. Andrews and H. M. Lewter. Eeporte adopted. 

Wallace Hartsell offered the following resolutions which Avas adopted 
by unanimous vote of the Association : 

That w^e extend to the pastor and people of the Church and community 
our sincere thanks for the magnificent way in which they have enter- 
tained this Association. 

The Clerk was instructed to have the Minutes of the Association from 
1903 to 1921 bound. 

On motion Brother McDuffie was requested to prepare historical 
data in regard to the churches comprising the Association; the expenses 
involved to be paid by the Executive Committee. 

Committee on Digest of Church Letters was continued for one year. 

On motion of Bro. Walter M. Williams, the Clerk of the Association 
Avrite each church clerk and pastor urging them to send Associational 
Mission money to J. N. Cheek, Treasurer Durham, N. C, and send it as 
early in the year as possible. 

The report of the Finance Committee was read. 

The Treasurer made his report. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 11 



The hour for the Evangelistic Sermon having arrived the Association 
adjourned, and Dr. J. Clyde Turner, of Greensboro, was introduced to 
the Association and he used as his text, Eomans 10:1. His subject 
being ''My Heart's Desire." The congregation was adjourned after the 
sermon, for dinner, but was asked to reassemble at 2 P.M., to hear 
another sermon by Dr. Turner, 

The session of the Asociation was fittingly closed with a strong- 
evangelistic sermon by Dr. Turner, he using a chain of scripture from 
eight text in the Old and Xew Testament, his subject being, ' ' God 's 
Plan of Salvation.'' 

W. S. OLIVE, Moderator, 
W. O. WILLIAMS, Clerk. 



PART II 

REPORTS 



HISTORIAN'S REPORT 

The Mount Zioii Baptist Association was first anticipated and con- 
sidered at a preliminary appointed meeting, held with Lystra Baptist 
Chuch in Chatham County, N. C, in the spring of 1870. There were 
thirteen Baptist churches : Antioch, Berea, Bethel, Cane Creek, Chapel 
Hill, Hillsboro, Lystra, Mount Carmel, Mount Pisgah, Mount Moriah, 
Mount Gilead, Mount Hermon, and Rose of Sharon. These thirteen 
churches were connected with Sandy Creek, Beulah, and Raleigh associa- 
tions. 

The causes that led to the organization of the Mount Zion Associa- 
tion was largeness of territory, conditions of roads, but few bridges, 
modes of travel, and expense of entertainment. Also, a faction arose 
in the Sandy Creek Association, from which most of the churches came, 
concerning the length of sessions, the meeting on the Sabbath 
to do the business of the body, and the subject of missions. One of 
these factions, led by Rev. George W. Purefoy, D. D., Rev. J. P. Mason, 
Rev. J. C. Wilson, and several influential laymen, contended for the 
exclusion of the Sabbath from these meetings, and make them more 
of a business session, to devise ways and means for the extension of 
missions, education, temj^erance, and Sunday school work. These breth- 
ren believed that a smaller organization would be more efficient, and 
do better service for the Master. The other faction Avanted a four-day 
session, have a report on missions and temperance, and a sermon on 
each of these subjects ; have preaching twice each day at a stand, erected 
especially for this preaching service, feast the body, and have a good 
social time generally. They thought that that was the place to show our 
numerical strength, and to disseminate the peculiar doctrines of our 
denominations. Hence they neglected to plan for systematic kingdom 
Avork. They claimed to be old land-markers and Avere opposed to launcli- 
ing out along any ncAV lines of action. They AA'anted a ' ' Thus sayeth 
the Lord ' ' for everything they did. They Avere desentive about more 
aggressive Avork relative to the objects of the Baptist State Convention. 
They Avere simply unprogressive. This counsel, after some consulta- 
tion, agreed to meet Avith Mount Moriah Baptist Church on the 23rd 
of September, 1870, and form a neAv Baptist association. 

They met at the appointed time and place, and organized the body. 
After the organization, the question of a name for the association arose. 
Several suggestions Avere submitted as to the name. After some dis- 
cussion the name of * ' Ncav Hope ' ' Avas suggested, in honor of XeAV Hope 
Creek. Bro. W. R. GAvaltney, one of the pastors in the neAv organi- 
zation, objected to the association being called by that name, because 
of the sluggishness of the stream. He claimed it Avas inappropriate for 
an associational name. To relieve the situation, Dr. T. H. Pritchard, 
a A'isiting brother representing the Board of Missions, suggested as a 
compromise, its present name ' ' Mount Zion, ' ' AA'hich Avas unanimously 
adopted. 

The churches constituting the Mount Zion Association at the first 
meeting, Avith their delegates, Avere as f oIIoavs : 

Antioch, from the Sandy Creek Association, Avas represented by 
Brethren Alvis Durham and H. M. C. Stroud. Elder S. BaldAvin Avas 



MouxT Ziox Baptist Association 13 



its pastor. Its former name was ''Haw River Mountains." The name 
was changed from "Haw Eiver Mountain" to its present name in 1830. 
It was admitted into the Sandy Creek Association in 1814. 

Berea came into the Mount Zion Association at its organization, 
represented by Brethren W. C. Mason^ T. N. Shepard, and A. X. Leigh 
It came from the Ealeigh Association. We know but little of its history 
previous to this organization. Its pastor at this time was Elder A. D. 
Blackwood. 

Bethel Church was originally called "Sandy Field." It was organ- 
ized by Elders E. T. Daniel ancl E. Trice of the Flat Eiver Association. 
It was admitted into the Sandy Creek Association in 1823. The name 
was changed from its original name to its present name in 1851. It 
came into the Mount Zion Association represented by Brethren M. M. 
Brewer, C. Whit Lloyd, J. Q. Lloyd, and William Andrews as delegates. 

Cane Creek came from the Sandy Creek Association. Its name ap- 
pears in the minutes of the Sandy Creek Association in 1807. In 1836 
it joined the Beulah Association and came to the Mount Zion Association 
in the organization represented by Brethren T. D. Oldham, F. Minor, 
and Chestley Moore as delegates. 

Chapel Hill Church was organized and admitted into the Sandy 
Creek Association in 1855 when it met at Antioch. It was an arm of 
Mount Carmel Church; and owes a debt of gratitude to Elder William 
Henry Merrett for his zeal and liberality. He was probably the first 
to conceive the idea of building a Baptist Church at the University of 
Xorth Carolina. He contributed $1200 toward the erection of the present 
building before his death. The church was organized, and the first 
meeting was held in the home of Bro. W. G. Weaver, by Elders J. J. 
James, Geo. W. Purefoy, J. C. Wilson, and B. J. Hacknev. Brethren 
P. H. McDade, X. Cheek, W. G. Weaver, and J. E. Hutchins were the 
delegates at the organization. Elder W. E. Gwaltney was its pastor. 

Hillsboro came into the Mount Zion Association, represented by 
E. D. Graham, J. Cheek, and J. E. Jones. It came from the Beulah 
Association. It has a record for advantages, having been served by 
some of our most influential brethren of the denomination. Elder W. E. 
Gwaltney was its much beloved, and efficient pastor when it came into 
the organization. 

Lystra. Church was organized in 1853, on the 30th day of September, 
when the Sandy Creek Association met at Bear Creek in Chatham County. 
It is an arm of Mount Carmel Church. The delegates representing it at 
the organization were Brethren W. E. Oldham, J. W. Oldham, W. C. 
Cole, and G. 0. Cole. Brother J. P. Mason w-as its pastor when it came 
into the Mount Zion Association. 

Mount Carmel Church was constituted at "Prichard's Meeting 
House" in 1803, a few miles south of its present location^ on Morgan 
Creek in Orange County. But little is known of its early history. Pre- 
vious to 1826 it belonged to the Flat Eiver Association. It is the mother 
of three of our most flourishing churches, Lystra, Mount Gilead, and 
Chapel Hill. Eev. William Hooper, D. D., a spiritual giant, and brother 
much beloved, of great intellectual force and power, was iDaptized into 
the fellowship of this church in 1832. From 1818 to 1832 there were 
six young brethren ordained to the Gospel ministry from this church. 
It was represented in this first meeting of the Mount Zion Association 
by Brethren E. M. Daniel, H. Sparrow, and J. L". Cheek. Xo pastor 
recorded. 

Mount Pisgah Church became a member of the new organization, 
coming to it from the Ealeigh Association. It was represented by Breth- 



14 Fifty-second Annual Session 



ren J. Horton, C. E. Scott, W. A. Markham and M. D. Williams. Elder 
J. C. Wilson was the first pastor in the new organization 

Mount Moriah Church came from the Beulah Association; and is a 
charter member of the Mount Zion Association, Its delegates represent- 
ing the church were Brethren A. Madrey, W. Strain, and W. T. Patter- 
son. Elder F. M. Jordan was pastor. 

Mount Gilead Church was organized, and came into the Sandy Creek 
Association in 1824 as an arm of Mount Carmel Church, Elder Wm. Farthl 
ing of the Flat River Association was the leader in its organization. It 
came represented by Brethren J. W. Hackney, A. S. Garner, and M. H. 
Haughton as delegates, and joined the Mount Zion Association when it 
was first organized. Brother J. C. Wilson was pastor. 

Mount Hermon Church came from the Beulah Association, and became 
a member of the Mount Zion Association represented by Brethren David 
Strayhorn, Hey Copley, and Henry Pickett, when it was organized. It 
was composed principally of dissatisfied Methodists. Brother Archie 
Hunter, who was a Methodist steward, was convinced of the Baptist 
faith, as being according to the new Testament by Elder Jessy Howell, 
and joined this church, and many others followed. Elder Jessy How- 
ell was pastor. 

Rose of Sharon, now the First Church of Durham, N. C, came from 
the Beulah Association, and joined, as one of the charter churches in the 
organization. It is the mother of all the Baptist churches of the City of 
Durham. It was represented in the organization of the Mount Zion 
Association by Brethren J. W. Carlton, Hirum Marcom, and J. N. 
Cheek. 

These are the churches that have laid the foundation for our work 
since the work of the Mount Zion Association began. The first Moder- 
ator of the Association was Rev. Geo. W. Purefoy, D. D. The first clerk 
was Brother H. M. C. Stroud of Antioch Church. 

The representative brethren who projected this work, were men of 
sterling worth. They planned wisely and judiciously, and trusted in 
God for wisdom and discretion to do it in His name, and for His honor 
and glory, and according to His will and purpose. They were men who 
' ' contended for the faith once delivered to the Saints. ' ' Our success, as 
an Association, has, in a large measure depended upon this. Only three 
of them are left, who were present at the organization, to tell us, in 
person, of the spirit that prevailed during that first session of the body. 
Elder F. M. Jordan of Calvert, N. C, who has well nigh reached his five 
score years ; Brother W. C. Cole of Chapel Hill Church, who is expectantly 
looking toward the sunset, and Brother E. 0. Cole of Lystra, who has 
gone beyond his four score years. We Avould be so glad, if any of these 
brethren are present, to speak to this report. 

God has signally blessed us in all our attempts to further His cause 
and Kingdom in the world. Beginning with thirteen churches, with a 
membership of 1,588, and a contribution of $111.45, fifty-one years ago; 
we have contributed, according to our report in last year's minutes, 
$186,141.48, and an increase in membership to 10,650, composing 50 
churches. While we have made some progress, we are far from what 
we might have done, had we measured up to our opportunities. Our 
Father has graciously blessed us in many ways, both temporally and 
spiritually. Shall we not take courage, and ' ' undertake great things 
for God, and expect great things from God?" To Him be all the praise, 
and honor, and glory for what has been done. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 15 



REPOET ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

The year 1920-21 has been a notable one for the Baptists of North 
Carolina. The impetus given to schools generally by the Con- 
stitutional Amendment requiring six months public school term and 
the strict enforcement of the compulsory school attendance law has 
already commenced to raise North Carolina from near the bottom of the 
percentage column of the States in illiteracy and has focused the atten- 
tion of the country generally on the progress being made by North Caro- 
lina in education. The Baptists have taken an advance position in the 
procession. The $75,000,000.00 campaign has resulted in a marked increase 
in the amount of money available for our various institutions. Our 
primary colleges, Wake Forest, Meredith and Chowan, our five secondary 
colleges and our twenty or more preparatory associational schools have 
every one almost without exception shown a great increase in attend- 
ance and a deeper interest in our educational program. The Baptists 
hold no mean positions in the great advancement in education generally 
and in their own denomination, they are far in advance of all others, 
as regards number of schools and attendance. While this affords us 
encouragement and cause for congratulation it also calls for increased 
labor and effort; for while we are doing more, there is greater need in 
our denomination. In members, the Baptists in our state pretty nearly 
equal all others; in education in the past our standards have been too 
low. We are beginning to place the emphasis in the right place. Let 
us push the great work of public education and thus prove our worth 
as citizens of our great state, but let us also and above all stand by our 
Baptist schools, for by and through them the great principles for which 
Baptists stand are kept in the minds and hearts of our young people. 
The great fear that the state would become mixed up in our religious life 
has caused the Bible to be used too little in the public schools of our 
country. For this reason our denominational schools must of necessity 
emphasize Bible teaching and Christian living and without them our 
state would be much poorer in educational facilities and our denomina- 
tion without everything essential to our life and growth. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. S. CRAWFORD. 

REPORTS ON ORPHANAGE 

An orphanage is, so far as this is possible, a substitute home for the 
homeless children who come under its care. And, more than this, it is 
a training school for these boys and girls. Its mission is to rescue and 
and save to lives of Christian service, homeless children who would other- 
wise often be early swept into the ways of evil. 

All of the material wealth of the world cannot weigh in the bal- 
ances against the souls and lives of our fellow-men. The Christian peo- 
ple of this commonwealth will see to it that well-conducted orphanages, 
performing their ministry so immeasurably great, shall have adequate 
moral and financial support. 

Each year orphanage managers find it difficult to secure a sufficient 
number of high-grade, well-equipped, efficient teachers and other workers. 
They have men and women not a few who are giving themselves with 
rare devotion and success to their noble task, but an opportunity such 
as an orphanage offers should challenge a greater number of our strong 
Christian men and women. Those who engage in this work ought to enter 
it with as high and holy a motive as that which moves the missionaries 



16 Fifty-second Annual Session 



to enter their field. In our North Carolina orphanages an increasing group 
of strong well-trained teachers and workers will find as strong an 
opportunity for the investment of their lives as can be found anywhere- 

The Thomasville Orphanage is, we believe, being conducted in an 
exceptionally efficient manner. Because they have confidence in those 
who labor there and believe that the institution is measuring up well, 
our people are giving it a large place in their hearts and in the bestow- 
nient of their gifts. While they live, good men and women are giving 
generously and they are more frequently remembering the orphanage 
with a bequest in their wills. 

The destruction of the Simmons Nursery by fire recently makes it 
necessary to build a larger, more modern, more expensive nursery. This 
added demand will stimulate at the approaching Thanksgiving season 
a greater outpouring of the gifts of the Baptists of North Carolina. 

In the application of a sound principle and in a broad minded spirit, 
our orphanage has been reaching out to assist some good, widowed 
mothers to hold their families together and give their children proper 
care and training. This form of service is now being tried out in a limited 
way in co-operation with local churches, but it promises to become a more 
and more valuable department of extension work of the orphanage. 

The orphanages of North Carolina are overwhelmed with applica- 
tions for the admission of children. "While we support these institutions 
and, probably, enlarge them, we must also meet our obligation to the 
many dependent, destitute children who cannot, and some of whom ought 
not to enter our institutions. We are glad that our orphanage at 
Thomasville is reaching out to succor some of the children who should 
not be removed from their widowed. Christian mothers. Our orphanage 
organization is pointing the way and leading to yet larger service. We 
can do no less than to go give it our our very heartiest co-operation and 
support. 

B. W. SOGERS. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS 

The primary object in the work of state missions is clearly set forth 
in a paper prepared by Eld. Thomas Meredith, about the time the Baptist 
State Convention was organized, in 1830. I quote from that paper: 
"A wish has prevailed, to some extent, and it is believed to be neither an 
unreasonable nor an unchairitable one, to see Baptist churches in many 
places where they are not; and to see all under the superintendence of 
a faithful and successful ministry. It is a plain case that where there 
is no church there adequate resources for the immediate support of the 
Gospel can not be expected. And it is equally plain that the ineffici- 
ency of a large proportion of the organized churches in the state is 
nearly, if not quite, as great. It is the grand object of the convention 
to supply these deficiencies.* * * * It is a state enterprise in which 
the welfare and reputation of the denomination are "involved, and in 
which many individuals are personally and deeply interested. ' ' In 
order to strengthen the churches already established and to build new 
ones, thus carrying out the original purpose of our pioneer fathers, the 
work has been greatly enlarged from time to time. 

That the work may be prosecuted to the best advantage, the State 
Convention has appointed a Board of Missions. This board is com- 
posed of twenty-one members at large, and one representative from 
each association. These busy, consecrated men, give their time and 
serve the denomination and the Kingdom without compensation. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 17 



A comparison of ten years ago and now will give some idea of the 
progress that is being made. 

Then we gave for state missions $41,428.46, last year $68,392.94; 
then 148 missionary pastors, now 196; then in one year 2,227 baptisms, 
this year in ten months, from one-fourth of the churches, 16,000 bap- 
tisms. 

Our force of office and field workers has been greatly increased. 
There are now 8 general state workers, or enlistment men, 2 Sunday 
school workers, 2 B. Y. P. U. workers, 2 W. M. U. workers, 2 educa- 
tional workers, and 3 office workers for the Board of Missions. So 
we see that the State Board of Missions has enlarged upon the origi- 
nal purpose to preach the Gospel and build churches in destitute places, 
and is now giving much attention to the very important business of 
training those who have been won for the Master, that they may be 
more useful and successful in winning yet others for Him. 

Since the work carried on under the supervision of our executive 
committee is considered and reported as a part of state mission work, 
it is not out of place to say that the State Board of Missions is taking 
large interest and rendering substantial aid to the missionary program of 
the Mount Zion Association. This phase of our Master 's business deserves 
our prayerful consideration, and in this time of moral and spiritual 
crisis, our most hearty and willing support. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

S. W. OLDHAM, 

Committee. 

EEPOET ON BIBLICAL BECOBDEB 

The Biblical Becorder has for 87 years been the organ of the Bap- 
tist State Convention, and the Mount Zion Association, being one of 
the Associational units of the Baptist State Convention, enjoys the 
privileges and blessings of this organ. It has been loyal to all our 
denominational interests, and its pages have always been open to every 
interest pertaining to the King's business, backed up by its able 
editors within the bounds of our Association, along all the lines of our 
endeavors. 

No one can be an intelligent Baptist, who does not read the Bibli- 
cal Becorder, notice if you please, that I said who does not read the 
Becorder. He may be an intelligent man, but the Becorder is the only 
source of information in regard to the great work of our denomination in 
this Association. The Apostle Paul established the Church and 
through it and its influence the religion of the Lord Jesus Christ 
has made wonderful advances; so with the Becorder, our religious organ, 
is the medium through which we become informed about the great work 
of our Master, so far as our denomination is concerned, and knowing 
and being acquainted with the work, we are encouraged to go forward 
with a greater zeal and can accomplish so much more. 

The Becorder is more than a denominational organ, its pages con- 
tain a variety of valuable matter, which is intended to and will uplift 
and bless each and every home, in which it goes and is read. 

The various articles which have been written by some of our ablest 
men during the past year, any of which, was worth far more the price 
of the paper for a whole year. 

The suggestion and admonition of the writer of this report is, that 
every family at least, in the Association subscribe for the Becorder and 
read it too. 



18 P^IFTY-SECOND AnNUAL SeSSION 



If any of you subscribe and read the paper, and then are not satis- 
fied, then Ave will see your friends and take up a collection and refund 
your money. 

No man or woman can be their best in this dear old Association, 
without reading the Biblical Eecordcr. 

Let us each and every one rally around and support the paper and 
its able editor and we will feel better. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

L. G. COLE. 

REPOKT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

The Sunday school has long been one of the best agencies of the 
church for promoting the church's interests. If we turn to the records, 
we find that, by far, the largest gains are through the Sunday school. 
And should we wonder at this, since no other organization in the 
church puts forth such an effort to teach the old and the young the 
Word of God as the Sunday school. Here we start with the children in 
the cradle roll age, one to three, and every effort of the live, wide awake 
Sunday school is to have them know more of the Word of God, the 
ultimate end being to have them accept Christ as their Savior and join 
the church. 

The work of the Sunday school has been so successful that some 
statisticians trace as high as ninety per cent of the accessions to the 
church from the Sunday school. This has been accomplished, in a large 
number of instances, with very poor organizations and methods, many 
of our schools not attempting to keep open through the winter months. 
And let me digress long enough to beg every Sunday school superinten- 
dent in this Association to use his very best efforts to keep his school 
open every Sunday in the year. 

All of our schools are operating without the hearty co-operation and 
support of every member of the church, which they can reasonably 
expect, and ought to have. It is just as much my business to do all 
I can for the success of my school as any other member in my church. 
On the other hand, it is just as much the business of any other member 
in my church as it is mine. God holds us responsible for the talent en- 
trusted to us. 

By referring to our report for last year, we find that we had in this 
Association fifty churches, with a membership of 10,561, and 51 Sunday 
schools, with an enrollment of 8,231, or 78 per cent of our church mem- 
bership represented in Sunday school. 

When we take into consideration the fact that a large number of 
those in our Sunda schools are children too young to accept Christ, 
and many older ones who have not accepted Him, we can see that a 
large per cent of our people are not lined up with this great work. It 
is great from a moral standpoint as well as religious. 

Judge James Beall, of Georgia, has made the statement that in the 
eight years that he has been on the bench as judge, 1,700 criminals have 
come before him, and only one of these was a Sunday school pupil. 

Judge Fawcett, of Brooklyn, stated, several years ago, that there 
had been before him 2,700 criminals, not one of whom was a Sunday 
school pupil. It is also stated that Judge Fawcett has, several times, 
during the past few years, sentenced boys to attend Sunday school 
regularly, with the charge that, if they missed Sunday school without 
a good excuse, he would give them the sentence that he would have given 
them at that time. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 19 

• I am glad to report that the future prospects of the Sunday school 
appears brighter than ever. Here and there the schools are taking 
on new life. Special efforts are being put forth to reach the people. 
Many schools are using the Graded Lessons, the Six Point Eecord System, 
taking religious census, and other things that will add new life and 
put them in closer touch with the people. 

I quote from a letter I received a few days ago from Brother 
Middleton : ' ' We know that we have had a very fine growth all along the 
line this year. For the first time, we have put on something like a 
real program through the state office. As you know, since spring- 
Brother A. L. Stevens and Mrs. Lydia Yates Billiard have been on 
our force. I think at the convention we are going to make a great 
showing. Our rural program, when rounded out, will show about these 
figures: Institutes held, 150. Enrollment, 6,200. Officers and teachers 
among these, 1,850. Visitors present, not enrolled, 3,800. Of course we 
have done other field work besides the above campaign. We will have 
reached this year, nearly 700 churches through their representatives 
at our institutes. We will touch in one way or another, in this pro- 
gram of field work, 400 superintendents and 300 pastors." 

There are many other things in connection with this work to which 
I would like to call your attention, but time forbids. I very earnestly 
commend all of these forward movements to your thoughtful, prayer- 
ful consideration. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

J. J. WAED. 

EEPOET ON FOEEIGN MISSIONS 

The year has been an eventful one, and, in many things a truly 
significant period in the history of Southern Baptist foreign missions. 
Long-cherished hopes have been fulfilled, achievements have crowned 
long and faithful effort in some of the older missions, and doors of 
opportunity have opened to new and inviting fields. Southern Baptists 
have begun a new career in missionary service. 

The increased receipts of the Board have made it possible for it 
to strengthen its missionary front on all fields. During the past 
twelve months 72 new missionaries have gone forth to witness for 
Christ in the lands of darkness. Of this number three were contributed 
by North Carolina. Miss Naomi Elizabeth Schell, who is a native of 
Greensboro, received her training at the North Carolina College for 
Women, and the W. M. U. Training School at Louisville, Ky. She was 
appointed by the Board to do work in Japan. Miss Alda Grayson, who 
is a native of Eutherfordton, received her training at Meredith College, 
W. M. U. Training School, and then took hospital training as a nurse, 
putting in part of the time in a hospital at Eutherfordton, and the 
remainder at Fordham Hospital, New York City. She will 
become a nurse in the- Kathleen Mallory Hospital at Laichowfu, China. 
Willard V. Nix was born near Zirconia. He received his training at 
Fruitland Institute, Wake Forest College, and the Southern Baptist 
Theological Seminary. He will work in Japan. 

The Foreign Mission Board has felt that with increasing resources 
its first and greatest responsibility has been to stabilize and secure the 
work which had already been opened and to which faithful men and 
women had given their lives unstintingly through the long days when 
reinforcements were few and equipment distressingly inadequate. Con- 
fidence is begotten for advance upon the enemy in new territory if we 
are able to hold the old lines. 



20 Fifty-second Annual Session 



It is well for us to reflect upon the magnitude to which we have 
expanded our foreign mission operations during recent months. For 
years Southern Baptists have prosecuted mission work in China, North 
Central, interior and South China — in Japan, Africa, Mexico, Brazil, 
Argentina, Uruguay, Chile and Italy. We have now added much of 
Southern Europe, Palestine, Syria and Siberia. 

The task is worthy of Southern Baptists and is characterized by 
thrilling prospects. "We have undertaken on our foreign fields, new and 
old, to give the gospel of Jesus to approximately 200,000,000 black 
people, 475,000,000 yellow people and 4,000,000 brown people, and to 
a white population of 225,000,000. 

The uplifting effects of the 75 Million Campaign have been keenly 
felt in our work in foreign lands. Our great advance here at home 
has inspired the native churches to efforts like unto our own. Every 
field is pressing its great campaign with fine success. 

The highest altitude in the number of baptisms was reached in the 
baptism of 6,998 converts. 

We now have 611 churches, 187 of which (almost one-third) are self- 
supporting. The total membership is 59,438. Their contributions last 
year amounted to about five dollars per member, 347, or a few more 
than half, own their own houses of worship. 

41,727 scholars were instructed in our 907 Sunday schools. 
■ 405 foreign missionaries are now under appointment, 72 having 
been sent out during the year. 

The Board owns 94 residences, to be used by these missionaries. 
This is about one-half the number needed for the present force. 

978 native workers are employed. 

Our 632 schools are crowded with 22,866 students. Of these, 284 
are theological students. This represents an increase over last year of 
68 schools and 4,352 students. These schools throb with life and possi- 
bilities. 

We have now 21 foreign physicians and 8 foreign mission nurses, 
who gave last year 154,070 treatments. This medical record is 
shoAvn to be more remarkable by the fact that several of these medical 
missionaries are new, and several of the older physicians were on fur- 
lough during most of the year. 

One of the largest contributions ever given to foreign missions, was 
the gift of a layman recently, who died at Anderson, S. C, during this 
year, leaving more than $1,000,000.00 to the Foreign Misson Board. 

At the meeting of the Foreign Mission Board, held June 8th and 9th, 
1921, fifty-two missionaries were appointed for work abroad. The 
session at which these young people told their religious experiences and 
calls to the work afar was memorable. It was a happy and inspiring 
occasion. 

In addition to this, Mr. E, C. Miller, who at the time of the Wash- 
ington Convention, was a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 
and since that time having joined the alvary Baptist Church of New 
York, and is now a full-fledged Baptist; made an appealing address 
before that body, on the establishment of a First Baptist Church, Col- 
lege, Hospital and Orphanage Asylum at Jerusalem, with a proposal to 
finance the project in Palestine. In his address before the Board, Mr. 
Miller stated that his change from a member of the Episcopal Church 
to the Baptist Church, was the result of prayerfully studying four books 
which came into his hands: The first, ''Baptists and Their Business," 
by Dr. Gambrell; the second, ''The Baptist Position and the Position 
for a Bapitst, ' ' by Dr. Love ; the third, ' ' The Axioms of Eeligion, ' ' 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 21 

by Dr. Mullins ; and the fourth, ' ' The Bible, the inspired word of God. ' ' 
He further stated that after a twenty-five years' membership, he 
severed his connection with the Episcopal Church. Quoting from his 
address^ he says: ''To break the church associations of a quarter of a 
century, leaving behind me my wife and my only boy, who are to me the 
dearest in the world, was a trial imposed upon me by a deep sense of 
duty. But I challenge any man who with an open mind and a prayer- 
ful heart studies these four books, to reach a different conclusion." 
This layman with his large conception of foreign mission work, will mean 
much to our new fields. 

But underneath the joy felt at this meeting of the Board ran an 
undercurrent of sorrow, due to the fact that the number set apart was 
very far below the number urgently needed this year. 

Two years of the five-year period have passed. The Board has been 
able to send out only about half the number it had estimated it should 
send out during that time. This fact should cause great searching of 
heart upon the part of our people. Where are the reapers? We must 
give ourselves earnestly to prayer for the desperately needed workers. 
Of course, we must meet fully our pledges in money. We must do at 
least that much. But, over and above our money, we must give our 
sons and our daughters to bear the message of love and salvation i"o 
the lost of the earth. Give both the money and the messengers. ' ' How 
shall they hear without a preacher and how shall they preach unless 
they be sent ? ' ' 

Eespectfully submitted, 

WALTER M. WILLIAMS. 

EEPOET OF ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONS AND EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE 

Our Associational Mission Board has given aid to eight churches and 
the total results are as follows : 

Hocutt Memorial — Additions: baptisms, 44; letter, 26; total con- 
tributions, $7,007.68. 

Glencoe — Additions : restored, 1 ; baptisms 1 ; total contribution, 
$550.75. 

Hillsboro Field — Additions: baptisms, 6; letter, 4; total contribu- 
tions, $2,563.00. 

Graham — Additions: baptisms, 3; letter, 10; total contributions, 
$3,943.87. 

Lakewood — Additions: baptisms, 17; letter, 11; total contributions, 
$4,451.11. 

West Hill — Additions: baptisms, 11; letter, 9; total contributions, 
$571.00. 

Total added by baptism, 82; letter, 58; total contributions, $17,036.54. 

We think fitting that we express words of commendation of this 
report. We recomend that our pastors stress Evangilism and Pastorial 
work. 

We further recommend that we as Associational Board, heartily rec- 
commend the work in Chapel Hill. 

We further recommend that the Association consider the advisabil- 
ity of an Associational worker and Evangelist. 

T. M. GREEN, 

Committee. 



22 FiFTY-SECOXD AXXUAL SeSSIOX 



EEPOET OX TEMPEEAXCE 

During the rear there has been great activity among the illicit 
dealers in strong drink. The manufacture and sale of whiskev seems 
to be on the increase. 

The writer 's conclusion is that too many church members and other 
so-called good citizens are not in sympathy with prohibition. 

There seems to be too much truth in the following parody: 

' ' My country, 'tis of thee, 
Land of grape juice and tea, 

Of thee I sing. 
Land where we all have tried 
To break the law and lied; 
From every mountain side 

The bootlegs spring. 
My native country thee, 
Land of home brewerie, 

Thy brew I love. 
I love thy booze that thrills 
And thy illicit stills 
Thy moonshine runs in rills 

From high above. ' ' 

A prominent jurist is credited with saying that: ''The prohibition 
laws cannot be enforced without the moral support of the people. 

We heartily commend those officers of the law who are diligent in 
running down violators of the prohibition laws. 

OflS.cers who are not in sympathy with the prohibition laws and who 
are delinquent in the discharge of their duties, should be retired as 
soon as possible. Only men who are prohibitionists in fact should be 
elected to enforce our laws. 

We believe that the laws of our state ought to be amended so as to 
conform to the Volstead act. 

Too many boys of tender age manage to secure cigarettes. 

Something ought to be done about this great evil. 

Eespectfullv submitted, 

JXO. L. HESTEB. 

EEPOET OX BAPTIST YOrX'G PEOP1.E "S UXIOX WOEK 

All business enterprises realize the importance of training in their 
various lines of activities, and have not neglected to promote this 
important factor if they have caught the vision of modern up-to-date 
methods of doing business. Therefore, our churches, realizing the impor- 
tance of a training department to meet the demands of the present 
age have organized the Baptist Young People's L'nion to fill this impor- 
tant mission. 

The enlistment, development and training of our young people for 
Christian service is of paramount importance, and we have no organiza- 
tion in the Baptist Church so well fitted to do this work as the ITnion, 
and it calls for the most loyal and hearty support of every member of 
the church whether young or old. 

An active wide-awake ITnion assures a church of an army of trained 
workers, willing, ready and capable of carrying forward any work that 
may demand their services. Many officers of our churches, teachers 
in our Bible schools, ministers of the Gospel, missionaries and faithful 



Mount Ziox Baptist Associatiox 23 

members of the church owe to the rniou the first impulse that lead 
them to lives of usefulness aud service. 

During the vear 1919 much valuable service was rendered by the 
B. Y. P. U. in making the Seventy-Five Million Dollar Campaign such 
a glorious success, and now in the face of the financial depression that 
rests over the entire south the B. Y. P. U. is doing a great work in 
promoting the spirit of sacrifice that in many instances is needed to 
meet our obligations. 

In our own Association the Union was given new enthusiasm by 
having the State convention meet with us during the summer of 1920. 
and again our Unions were inspired to greater service by our represen- 
tatives to Charlotte last June, and are noAV striving to follow the leader- 
ship of Mr. Perry Morgan, State Secretary, as he points the way to higher 
ancl more consecrated lives. 

Our Association has Unions in only about 50 per cent, of its churches, 
and it should be the aim of every pastor and messenger enrolled to 
see that their individual church has a Baptist Young People's Union, 
making our Association 100 per cent, at its next meeting. 

EespectfuUv submitted^ 
E. CLYDE JOHXSOX. 

EEPOET OX WOMAX'S WOEK. 

During the year that has passed, a year marked by unusual con- 
ditions which have affected many of our people, and all phases of 
our work, — the women of the Mount Zion Association have made steady 
progress along all lines of their work. XineJeen neiv societies have 
been organized. ^Vhile the entire amount up to date for the seventy- 
five million has not been paid, yet they are slowly climbing the ladder 
to the goal. The amount paid in during the past year is twenty-two 
thousand four-hundred and sixty-five dollars. In order to complete the 
large pledge made of one-hundred and sixty-five thousand in the five-year 
period, it will be necessary for the women and children to pay for the 
next three years, forty-three thousand each year. Let it be remembered 
that the pledge for this Association was one of the largest in the State. 
In order to redeem this pledge each church must do its part aud 
give credit to the women and children for their part. A report must be 
sent in at the end of each Cjuarter. It is ahsoluteJy necessary for the 
Church Treasurer to give the Woman's Missionary Society Treasurer 
credit with the amount given by women and children in the church. 
There are now 40 W. M. societies, 14 Y. W. A. societies, 29 Sunbeam 
Bands, 9 Girls' Auxiliaries, and 8 Eoyal Ambassador Bands in the 
Association. There are only a few churches left without organizations. 
If the pastors of these churches would help the women, we might have 
a Woman 's Missionary Society in every church in the Mount Zion 
Association. 

Personal service and soul winning have been the most important 
things before the women the past year. Their aim has been, *' Every 
One, Win One. ' ' A most important thing before the women today is 
the training of the children in mission study and work, giving them a 
clearer and broader vision of the work of the Kingdom. A training 
school girl has rendered valuable services during the past summer in 
the country churches. 

At the recent meeting of the women held at Chapel HiU — Mrs. C. L. 
Haywood, who has served in the capacity of superintendent for the 



24 Fifty-second Annual Session 



past seventeen years has given up the work^ and Mrs. M. W. Buck of 
Burlington has been elected as her successor for the coming year. 

Our noble women are always ready and willing to help in any good 
cause. Let us at all times encourage them^ and as Paul says^ ' ^ Help 
those women in the furtherance of the Gospel." 

C. L. HAYWOOD, 

Committee. 

THE EEPORT ON HOME MISSIONS 

As a matter of appreciation in this land of promise for the freedom, 
liberty and happiness of the whole Christian world, the God of our 
forefathers heard their cry and led them out of the Egypt of the old 
world to this land of achievement and conquest for Him; we cannot do 
less than really possess it under the royal banner of His cross. On 
our home mission work depends our mission work for half of our fellow 
beings, as Southern Baptists, are now undertaking half the task of the 
whole earth. So we are now where we cannot hesitate nor falter. Our 
late great Christian statesman, kingdom leader and fellow worker, Dr. 
J. B. Ganibrellj last message was^ ' ' Do right and go forward, ' ' Also 
these words previously, ' ' The day for which our Baptist fathers waited 
and suffered and died, has dawned. What they died for let us live for 
in a worthy fashion. The matchless blessings of God are upon us." 

I quote these words from a page in Dr. Geo. McDaniel's new 
Dook, ' ' The Churches of the New Testament : ' ' The purpose for which 
a church exists is missions. Take out of a church the missionary idea 
and you have a ship without a port, an athlete without a goal, a soldier 
without an order, a life without an objective. You have a barren tree that 
cumbers the ground, an empty house over whose door is written, ' ' Icha- 
bod. ' ' Limit the gospel in its scope or power and you cut its heart out. ' ' 
And again, ' ' Christ lived and died for all men. ' ' The business of the church 
is to make him known to all men. Our Christian religion revolves around 
two foci, ''come" and ''go." It was our Lord's most frequent. His 
perpetual command. It is the key to the parables. It is the beginnig 
and end of the model prayer, ' ' Thy Kingdom come, for Thine is the 
Kingdom. " It is the driving wheel of a church or denomination. Stop 
that wheel and the machinery is motionless and useless. It is the 
authority of Christian education. Colleges, Bible schools, and semi- 
maries were founded to fit men to "go." In our southland of multiplied 
Christian influences, the field is the whitest unto the harvest of all the 
fields of the earth. Our last year's record shows this to be true, and 
if all signs fail not this year will yield a ' ' bumper ' ' crop. We have 
this from our Conservation Commission : ' ' Last year we baptized 
175,000 persons. The indications this year encourage the belief that 
this number will be increased. ' ' God 's wise man tells us. Proverbs 
11:30, "He that is wise winneth souls. '^ The outstanding fact in the 
Christian warfare is^, the more you win, the easier it is to win. We are 
winning faster everywhere and if we are true soldiers this will give us 
heart and courage to redouble our efforts. Our S'".viour won, though 
Calvary lay before Him, ' ' He saw the travail of His soul and 
was glad." 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. G. DOSSET. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 25 

EEPOET OF J. N. CHEEK, TEEASUREE OE MOUNT ZION 
ASSOCIATION 

AMOUNTS EECEIVED FEOM CHUECHES AND FINANCE 
COMMITTEE FOE 

Seventy-Five Million $108.50 

Home Missions 10.00 

Christian Education 22.33 

Ministers' Eelief 20.56 

Orphanage 37.60 

Minute Fund 229.00 

Hospital 7.00 

Association Missions 1,709.83 

On hand last Eeport 224.04 

$2,368.86 
DISBUESEMENTS 

Home Missions $10.00 

Christian Education 22.33 

Ministers' Eelief 20.56 

Minute Fund 218.40 

Orphanage 37.60 

Seventy-Five Million 108.50 

Hospital 7.00 

Association Missions 1,552.50 

Balance on hand 391.97 



)$2,368.86 
(O. K.) E. T. HOWEETON. 

EEPOET OF FINANCE COMMITTEE 
We, our Finance Committee, beg leave to make the f oIloAving report : 

Minute Fund r. $199.40 

State Missions 55.50 

Associational Missions 201.23 

Ministers Eelief 50.00 

75 Million Campaign 213.35 

Home Missions 40.00 

Foreign Missions 68.38 

Orphanage 62.00 

Christian Education 55.00 

Hospital 10.00 



$954.86 



Eespectfully submitted, 

A. T. OLIVE, 
J. N. CHEEK, 
WALTEE M. WILLIAMS. 



PART III 

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HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE MT. ZION ASSOCIATION 



PLACE OF 

MEETING 



MODERATOR- 



CLERK 



1870 

1871 

1872 

1873 

1374 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1908 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 



Mount Moriah.... 
Mount Pisgah_... 

Antiocli..-- 

Durham _ 

Lystra 

Cane Creek 

Mount Hermon.- 

Olive Chapel 

Bethe! — 

Graham 

Durham -. 

Mount Gilead 

Moore's Chapel- 
Mount Pisgah.... 

Chapel Hill 

Sandy Level 

Cedar Pork 

Rose of Sharon. 
Mount Carmel.-. 

Berea 

Red Mountain- 
Cane Creek.. 

Olive Chapel 

Burlington 

Mount .Moriah... 

Bethesda 

Mount Gilead.— 
Berry's Grove.... 

Antioch-- 

Mount Pisgah... 

Graham 

Lystra 

East Durham.... 

Cane Creek 

Cedar Fork 

Swepsonville 

Bethel 

Olive Chapel 

Burlington 

Mars Hill.. 

Bells 

Berea 

Red Mountain... 

Mebane 

Yates 

Cross Roads 

Carrboro 

Lowe's Grove.... 

No Meeting 

Mount Hermon. 
Olive Chapel 



Rev. J. 
Rev. J. 



Rev. G. W. Purefoy.... 
Rev. G. W. Purefoy.... 
Rev. John C. Wilson.... 
Rev. John C. Wilson.. 
Rev. John C. Wilson.. 
R'av. John C. Wilson.. 
R'3v. John C. Wilson.. 
Ivav. John C. Wilson.. 

Rev. J. P. Mason 

P. Mason 

P. Wilson 

Rev. J. P. Mason 

Rev. J. P. Mason 

Rev. J. P. Mason 

Rev. J. P. Mason 

Rev. John C. Wilson.. 
Rev. John C. Wilson.. 
Rev. John C. Wilson.. 
Rev. John C. Wilson.. 

A. B. Roberson 

W. A. Albright 

W. A. Albright 

W. A. Albright 

W. A. Albright 

Rev. J. L. Carroll 

Rev. O. C. Horton.... 
Rev. O. C. Horton.... 
Rev. O. C. Horton.... 
Rev. O. C. Horton.... 
Rev. O. C. Horton.... 

T. B. Parker 

T. B. Parker 

T. B. Parker 

T. B. Parker 

T. B. Parker 

T. B. Parker 

Rev. C. J. Thompson. 
Rev. C. J. Thompson. 
Rev. W. C. Barrett... 
Rev. W. C. Barrett... 
Rev. W. C. Barrett... 

C. P. Norris 

C. P. Norris 

C. P. Norris 

C. P. Norris 

W. R. L. Smith 

J. F. McDuffie 

J. P. McDuffie 

J. F. McDuffie 

J. F. McDuffie 

W. S. Olive 



H. M. C. Stroud. 


H. M. C. Stroud. 


B. M. C. Stroud. 


B. M. C. Stroud. 


a. M. C. Sfroud. 


H. M. C. Stroud. 


H. M. C. Stroud. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


0. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. R. Scott. 


C. L. Haywood. 


C. L. Haywood. 


0. L. HayAvood. 


C. L. Haywood. 


C. L. Haywood. 


C. L. Haywood. 


C. P. Norris. 


C. P. Norris. 


S. J. Husketh. 


S. J. Husketh. 


S. J. Husketh. 


S. J. Husketh. 


S. J. Husketh. 


S. J. Husketh. 


Chas. C. Smith. 


Chas. C. Smith. 


Chas. C. Smith. 1 


Chas. C. Smith. 



PLEDGES FOR 1921 

On the basis of $200.00 a year for Benevolences, or $1,000.00 for the first 
year period of the Seventy-five Million Campaign, the apportionments for the 
various ob.iects is as follows: 



Education $53.54 

Foreign Missions 53.54 

Home Missions 32;00 

State Missions 26.51 



Associational Missions $ 6.62 

Ministerial Relief 10.00 

Orphanage 12.53 

Hospital 5.67 



If a church's apportionment, or pledge, is $400.00 a year, the above amounts 
may be easily doubled, etc. 

Send Associational Missions to J. N. Cheek, Treasurer, Durham, N. C. 



CONSTITUTION 



Article 1. This Association shall be called Mount Zion Baptist 
Association. 

Art. 2. The Association shall meet annually on Tuesday after the 
second Sunday in October, and be composed of the ordained ministers 
belonging to, and members chosen annually by the several churches be- 
longing to this body, who by presenting letters from their respective 
churches certify their appointment, shall be entitled to seats. 

Art. 3. The number of delegates from each church shall be three, 
and one additional delegate from each Sabbath School connected with 
that church, who shall be a member of some Baptist Church. 

Art. 4. The letters from the churches shall state the number bap- 
tized, received by letter, restored, dismissed by letter, excluded and died 
during the past year, the total number in fellowship, and the amount 
paid as pastor's salary, incidental expenses, minute fund, for the poor. 
State, Foreign, Home Missions, Educational, Baptist Orphanage, Sab- 
bath School, Old Ministers' Relief, Associational Missions and such 
other information as may be deemed necessary for publication. 

Art. 5. The members thus convened shall sit as an advisory council, 
who shall have no power to infringe on any of the internal rights of the 
churches. 

Art. 6. In all their discussions and acts, this Association shall rec- 
ognize Christ as the only law-giver in Zion, and that every individual 
church is an independent body. 

Art. 7. It shall be the duty of this Association when requested by 
aggrieved members to hear their grievances, give appropriate advice, or 
send committees to aid them in their difiiculties. If the minority of the 
church is aggrieved with the majority, upon application they shall be 
entitled to the same consideration. Individual applicants will not be 
entertained. 

Art. 8. The Association shall have power to withdraw from any 
church that shall knowingly or wilfully depart fro mthe orthodox prin- 
ciples of the religion as taught in the Bible and held by the regular 
Baptists as the true teachings thereof. 

Art. 9. The officers of this Association shall be : A Moderator, a 
Vice-Moderator, a Clerk, a Treasurer, a Historian, and an Auditor. 

Art. 10. All of the officers of this Association shall be elected an- 
nually by ballot. 

Art. 11. The Clerk shall keep a faithful record of its proceedings 
and have the minutes published and distributed to the churches accord- 
ing to the amount paid by each for such object. He shall be paid 
fifty ($50.00) dollars out of the minute fund for his work. 

Art. 12. The Historian shall collect and put in some durable form 
all facts of interest about each of the churches and report at each 
session of this body. 

Art. 13. The Treasurer shall receive and pay over to the proper 
parties all the money contributed by the churches and make an annual 
report to the Association. 

Art. 14. The Auditor shall annually examine the Treasurer's books 
and see that they are kept in an intelligent, business-like way, and at- 
test the report. 



36 Fifty-second Annual Session 



Art. 15. This Association shall be an auxiliary to the Baptist State 
Convention in all Educational, Mission, Sunday School and other work. 

Art. 16. Baptist Churches on application for admission to this body 
shall be received and their delegates seated, if necessary evidence is 
given that they are truly of our faith and order. 

Art. 17. Amendments to this Constitution may be made at any an- 
nual meeting, two-thirds of the member sconcurring. 

Art. 18. There shall be an Executive Committee of nine members to 
which shall be entrusted the Avork of planning and directing the mis- 
sionary activities within the bounds of the Association; to carry into 
effect the decisions of this body, when necessary or not otherwise pro- 
vided for, and to act for the Association during the inerregtnum be- 
tween Associational sessions. 

The Committee shall be elected in groups of three each, as follows: 
one group to serve for three years, three to serve for two years, and 
three for one year. Thereafter three members to be elected annually as 
the term of each group shall expire. 

Art. 19. The Associational year shall begin on October first and 
close on September thirtieth. 



PART IV 
MINUTES OF THE 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 



The sixteenth annual session of the W. M. U. of the Mount Zion 
Association met with the Woman 's Missionary Society of the Chapel 
Hill Baptist Church on the 6th of September, 1921. The superintendent, 
Mrs. C. L. Haywood, presided over the meeting. 

The audience sang ' * I am Thine, O 'Lord. ' ' The devotional exercise 
was conducted by Mrs. W. J. Grain of Grace Church (formerly North 
Durham), her subject being ''Christ's Personal Love." The Association 
was welcomed by Mrs. A. C. Howell and Mrs. W. S. Olive responded. 

Mrs. Haywood made her annual report to the Association. The 
Association enjoyed most heartily a very interesting talk by Mrs. 
Wade Bostick of China, one of our beloved missionaries who has just 
come home on a much needed furlough. 

She spoke of her work in such an interesting way that we could 
almost feel that we were with her on her journeys out from the home 
station and see how eager the people are to learn of Jesus. 

She told of the help they had received through the 75 Million Cam- 
paign and of other helps which they were hoping and praying for. A 
hospital is one of the greatest needs, as the healing of the body is one 
of the surest ways to open the door of the heart to teaching of Christ. 

Mrs. W. H. Vernon read a most interesting paper on ''Campaigu 
Pledges. ' ' 

A motion was carried that Mrs. Vernon's paper be sent to the 
Biblical Recorder for publication. 

Eoll call of societies with 19 churches represented with 41 delegates 
present, and several visitors. Mrs Haywood appointed the following 
committees: Obituary, Time and Place, Eesolution. 

The morning session adjourned. The noon hour was spent in par- 
taking of a splendid dinner served by the ladies of the Chapel Hill 
church. 

The afternoon session was opened with song, ''My Faith Looks Up 
to Thee." Devotions were led by Miss Mattie Matthews of Temple 
Church, using Psalm 145:1-13, emphasizing the importance of prayer in 
our daily life. Prayer by Mrs. E. D. Poe. At this time Miss Grace 
Olive made a splendid talk on the work of our Woman's Training 
School at Louisville. Next Miss Elizabeh Briggs made a talk to the 
Sunbeam leaders. She was at her best and every one enjoyed hearing 
her. Mrs. E. D. Poe spoke on personal service. The giving of our lives 
as Christians into the Master's service. The Temple Church feels 
honored that three young people have given their lives in the service 
of the King, two having entered our training school in Louisville this 
fall. 

Echoes from S. B. C. by Mrs. M. W. Buck was greatly enjoyed by 
all. 

Song, "On Higher Ground," was sung. 
Eoll call of Junior Societies by Miss Jinkins. 



38 Fifty-second Annual Session 



At this time Mrs. H. F. Brinsoii made a talk on ' ' Mission Study in 
the Association." Mrs. Brinson is thoroughly at home on this subject 
and it was enjoyed by all. 

The committees gave their reports: 

KEPOET OF COMMITTEE ON EESOLUTIONS 
Whereas, Mrs. C. L. Haywood, who has served the ' ' W. M. U. " 
of the Mount Zion Association as superintendent for the past fifteen 
years, has severed her connection as superintendent and whereas Mrs. 
Haywood while serving in this inportant position contributed by her 
personal character, missionary zeal, and administrational ability, to the 
development of the women's work throughout the entire Association. 
Therefore, be it resolved, first : 

That we the, W. M. U. of Mount Zion Association, take this oppor- 
tunity to express our hearty appreciation, and sincere love, and admira- 
tion for Mrs. Haywood, who by her earnest zeal has inspired us to attempt 
yet greater things for the Master. 
Be it resolved^ second : 

That to her successor, Mrs. M. W. Buck, we pledge our loyal support, 
and co-operation, and most earnest prayers. 

Eespectfully submitted, 
MES. T. M. GEEEN, 
Mrs. J. M. WHITTED, 
MES. E. D. POE. 

EEPOET OF NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Your committee realizing the enormity and responsibility of the 
work and knowing that the burden of this has fallen heavily upon our 
Superintendent, Mrs. C. L. Haywood, who has served us so faithfully 
for a number of years, our women appreciate her consecrated time and 
talents being given so long in this line, we deem it a privilege to lighten 
her burden, but still retain her wise counsel and valued experience as a 
member of an Executive Committee. So, after prayerful considera- 
tion, your committee recommends an entire change in officers as follows : 
Superintendent, Mrs. M. W. Buck; Assistant Superintendent, Mrs. 
W. J. Grain; Leader of Y. W. A. and G. A., Mrs. Walter Williams; 
Leader of Sunbeams and E. A., Mrs. E. L. Baskins; Secretary and 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. L. Bassett. We further recommend the following 
three names as members on the Executive Committee : Mrs. C. L. Haywood, 
Mrs. E. Walton, Mrs. A. C. AndreAvs. 

Eespectfully submitted, 
MES. J. E. WELSH, 
MES. E. L. BASKINS, 
MES. J. H. VEENON, 
MES. S. W. OLDHAM, 
MISS EUTH JINKINS. 

EEPOET OF COMMITTEE ON TIME AND PLACE 

We the Committee on Time and Place recommend that we meet 
with Yates Church, Tuesday after 2nd Sunday in September, 1922. 

Eespectfully submitted, 
MES. G. N. HAEWAED, 
MES. E. D. POE, 
MISS JINKINS. 

Committee on Eesolutions. 



J 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 39 



REPORT OF OBITUARY COMMITTEE 

'With sorrow and loving tenderness, we record the home-going of 
some of our co-workers in Mt. Zion Association, who have labored most 
faithfully and lovingly with us and have entered upon richer rewards. 
During the past year we have sustained the loss of Mrs. A. M. Rigsbee, 
Mrs. W, P. Holloway, Mrs. J. B. Elliott, First Church, Durham; Mrs. 
J. S. Rigsbee, Mrs. Martha Gattis, Hocutt Memorial; Mrs. Poe, 
Efland; Mrs. C. A. Peed, East Durham. 

Resolved, (1) That we thank God for the lives of these consecrated 
women for their influence will long be felt among us. 

(2) We extend our sympathy to the bereaved families and the socie- 
ities in which these friends worked. 

Respectfully submitted, 
MRS. GATES, 
MRS. SALMON, 
MRS. BRINSON. 
Durham, N. C, April 12, 1921. 



We, the women of the Mount Zion Association, Resolve, First to thank 
'the ladies of Chapel Hill Church for their wonderful hospitality today 
in entertaining us. 

Second, we thank the officers of our Association for their splendid 
work during the past year and their preparation in presenting the help- 
ful program to which we have listened. 

Third, we want to thank Miss Elizabeth Briggs for her helpful talk 
on our work. 

Fourth, we want to offer to Mrs. W, D. Bostick, of Pochow, our sin- 
cere appreciation for her inspiring talk, especially since we are aware of 
her recent long and tiresome trip. May we too, through the coming year 
show our appreciation of not only Mrs. Bostick but others on the fields 
by pledging ourselves anew in service to our God. 

Fifth, may we all resolve to emphasize with renewed enegry our in- 
terest in and co-operation with the young people of our church and 
congregation in deepening their interest in missionary activities. 

Sixth, Resolved that we encourage our women in endeavoring to 
extend the circulation of our missionary and Baptist periodicals Home 
and Foreign Fields, Boyal Service, and particularly to the page devoted 
to Women's Work in our own Biblical Recorder. 

MRS. J. E. WELSH, Chairman, 
MRS. G. E. ISAACS, 
MRS. J. H. VERNON. 



PARTY 
MINUTES OF THE 

SUNDAY SCHOOL CONVENTION 



The Mount Zion Baptist Sunday School Convention held its 9th annual 
session with the Edgemont Baptist Church on Tuesday morning, April 
12^ 1921. The session was called to order by the president, Brother 
Kogers, and the opening song service was conducted by Brother Betts. 

Enrollment of delegates and visitors was called for by the presi- 
dent, followed by miscellaneous business. 

Eev. M. W. Buck advised the convention that Bro. H. F. Brinson 
would be unable to attend the convention on account of the death 
of his father, and made a motion that a message expressing the 
convention's sympathy to Bro. Brinson, be sent him and that the body 
bow in prayer in his behalf. The motion was seconed by Eev. C. C. 
Smith and unanimously carried. The president called on Brother Buck to 
lead the prayer. A telegram was sent as follows : ' ' The Mount Zion 
Baptist Sunday School Convention in annual convention assembled 
tender assurances of Christian sympathy in this time of bereavement. 
Second Corinthians, first chapter and verses three and four. ' ' 

The minutes of last session were read and approved. Appointment 
of committees as follows: Nominating: W. S. Olive, S. W. Oldham, 
Miss Eymer. Time and Place: M. W. Buck, H. G. Dorsett, C. C. Smith. 

Mr. E. L. Middleton requested that a committee be appointed to 
meet with him sometime during the day with reference to the country 
Sunday school work. The president appointed the following committee : 
H. G. Dorsett, W. S. Olive, S. W. Oldham. 

The clerk of the Association advised the Convention that he was 
not furnished with a copy of the minutes of the last session of the Sun- 
day School Convention, and was therefore unable to include them in the 
minutes of the Association. 

The Program Committee submitted the program which was accepted 
and carried out as follows : 

^'Putting Life into the Sunday School Message" was forcibly dis- 
cussed by L. E. M. Freeman, after which was a class period. The 
session assembled in three classes as follows : ' ' Studies in the Old Testa- 
ment, " taught by Eev. C. C. Smith. '^The Seven Laws of Teaching," 
taught by Dr. D. B. Bryan ; ' ' The Country Sunday School, ' ' taught by 
Mr. E. L. Middleton. After the class period the convention was delight- 
fully and helpfully entertained with an address by Mr. H. F. Strick- 
land, of Nashville, Tenn. Adjourned for dinner. 

TUESDAY AFTEENOON SESSION 

Devotional exercises were conducted by Bro. Eoberts, of Mebane, 
after which the president appointed L. V. Byrd and P. E. Eoberts 
committee on awarding banner. 

Eound table discussion was conducted by H. L. Strickland, followed 
by class period. After the class period Brother E. C. Dean of Burlington, 
spoke on ' ' Jesus ' Methods of Teaching, ' ' after which the convention 
adjourned. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 41 



TUESDAY EVENING SESSION 

Devotional and song service was conducted by Bro. W. H. Hart- 
sell at 7:30. At 7:45 Professor Bates, of the Durham High School, 
taking the place of Professor E. C. Pusey^ spoke on *' Public School 
Credit for Sunday School Work." At 8:15 Bro. H. L. Strickland 
addressed the convention. 

Miscellaneous Business: Upon motion of the body, Prof. Bates was 
extended thanks for the helpful address and requested to furnish copy 
of same for publication in the Durham papers. The president called 
for further enrollment of delegates, after which the convention 
adjourned to meet Wednesday morning. 

WEDNESDAY MOENING SESSION 

Devotional exercises conducted by Eev. E. P. Ellington, of the 
Graham Church. At 10:00 o'clock, ^'The Teacher's Eesponsibility " 
was discussed as follows: Eirst, ''For Building His Own Class," T. 
M. Green and W. M. Williams. Second, ' ' For Holding His Pupils for 
Preaching Service," Mrs. M. W. Buck. Third ''For Training His Class 
in Giving," Hurley Parish. At 10:45, class period, after which the 
convention was again addressed by H. L. Strickland. 

Miscellaneous Business: Eeport of Nominating Committee, which 
report was accepted and following officers were elected for the ensuing 
year: 

For President, Eev. E. C. Dean, Burlington ; For Vice-President, S. 
W. Andrews, Chapel Hill ; Eecording Secretary, W. H. Bright, Durham ; 
Corresponding Secretary, S. W. Oldham, Hillsboro; Treasurer, E. L. 
Smith, Chapel Hill; Executive Committee, B. W. Eogers, H. F. Brinson, 
T. M. Green. 

After enrollment of further delegates the session adjourned for 
dinner. 

WEDNESDAY ATEENOON SESSION 

Devotional exercises were conducted by H. G. Dorsett at 1:45. 
At 2:00 o'clock the convention was helpfully addressed by W. S. Olive. 
Subject : ' ' How to Gain Co-operation in the Home in Lesson Study. ' ' 
Class period. At 3:00 o'clock, Mr. H. L. Strickland gave his final 
address to the convention, after which upon motion of Eev. M. W. 
Buck, the convention rose in a vote of thanks to the Program Committee, 
and Mr. E. L, Middleton, for arranging the convention at a time when 
it could be favored with the addresses of Mr. H. L. Strickland, of the 
Sunday School Board. 

Miscellaneous Business : The Committee on Time and Place made 
the following report : First, that the time of the meeting be changed from 
Tuesday after the 3rd Sunday in April, to Tuesday after the 3rd Sun- 
day in March. Second: That the place of the next meeting be West 
Durham. After full discussion on the report upon motion, same was 
adopted. 

The Committee on enrollment and banner made the following report: 



42 



Fifty-second Annual Session 



No. 0. andT. 

Church on Roll 

Burlington 17 

Berea 7 

Cari'boro 13 

Cedar Fork 11 

East Durham 20 

First Durham 28 

Edgemont 15 

Lakewood Not Eeported 

Hillsboro 10 

Hillsboro, West Hill 11 

Hocutt Memorial 13 

Graham 12 

Lowes Grove 7 

Mount Gilead 9 

Mount Pisgah 10 

Lystra 10 

Mars Hill 7 

Mebane 12 

Olive Chapel 19 

Pleasant Hill 5 

Rose of Sharon 5 

West Durham 24 

North Durham 10 

Chapel Hill 16 

Berry Grove 5 

Antioch 10 



No. Reps. 


No. of 0. and T 


Per- 


Present 


Present 


centage 


4 


4 


231/. 


1 


1 


14 


1 


1 


7% 


14 


11 


100 


13 


7 


35 


16 


6 


211/4 


50 


23 





6 


5 





7 


■3 


60 


1 


1 


9 


12 


11 


85 


4 


4 


33% 


5 


4 


57 


3 


2 


22 


2 


2 


20 


5 


3 


30 


4 


2 


281/0 


3 


2 


162/3 


5 


5 


26 


1 


1 


20 


4 








12 


9 


381/2 


1 


1 


10 


1 


1 


61/i 


9 


2 


40 


1 


1 


10 



The banner, which is awarded to the school having the largest per 
cent of ofiicers and teachers present, was awarded to Cedar Fork, who 
had 100%. The next highest being Hocutt Memorial with 85%. There 
was a total of 26 churches represented with a total representation of 
128, 115 of Avhich were officers and teachers. 

The report of the Treasurer as follows: 

Balance on hand last year $47.93 

Received 1.00 

$48.93 
Amount Disbursed 11.50 

Leaving a balance on hand of $37.43 

Upon motion of T. M. Green, the following resolution was offered: 

' ' Be it resolved that this body give a rising vote of thanks to the 
members of Edgemont Baptist Church and the Baptists of Durham 
for royal hospitality during this Convention. ' ' Upon a rising vote 
the resolution was adopted. 

Upon motion the Convention adjourned to meet with the West Dur- 
ham Baptist Church on Tuesday after the 3rd Sunday in March, 1922. 

Respectfully submitted, 
WALTER M. WILLIAMS, 

Recording; Secretary. 



MINUTES 



FIFTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 



-it .^ -j^ 



HELD WITH 

ROSE OF SHARON BAPTIST CHURCH 

DURHAM COUNTY. N. C. 

OCTOBER 10-11, 1922 



•^ .^ .35 



The next session will be held with Mount Moriah Church, Tuesday and 
Wednesday, after the second Sunday in October, 1923 



-^ S S 



RALEIGH 

Bynum Printing Company 

1922 



MINUTES 



FIFTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 



c^* ^^ C^T* 



HELD WITH 

ROSE OF SHARON BAPTIST CHURCH 

DURHAM COUNTY, N. C. 

OCTOBER 10-11, 1922 






The next session will be held with Mount Moriah Church, Tuesday and 
Wednesday, after the second Sunday in October, 1923 



Ci5* C(^ «^* 



RALEIGH 

Bynum Printing Company 

1922 



OFFICERS 

W. S. OLIVE, Moderator Apex 

W. M. WILLIAMS, Yice-Moderator Burlington 

W. O. WILLIAMS, Clerk Durham 

J. N. CHEEK, Treasurer Durham 

W. S. ANDREWS, Auditor Chapel Hill 

J. F. MacDUFFIE, Historian Chapel Hill 



ORDAINED MINISTERS HOLDING CHURCH MEMBERSHIP IN 
ASSOCIATION 



Baskin, E. L Chapel Hill 

Beech, W| R Hillsboro 

Brinson, H. F East Durham 

Buck, Martin W Burlington 

Canipe, J. C : Mebane 

Collins, Trela D Durham 

Cox, R. E West Durham 

Davis, J. B Carrboro 

Dorsett, H, Grady Carrboro 

Dean, E. C Burlington 

Ellington, R. P Graham 

Green, Thomas M...West Durham 
Harward, G. N...Morrisville, R. 1 
Kinnett, A. D Louisville 



Lennon, R. S Burlington 

MacDuffie, J. F Chapel Hill 

Morriss, Roy Bynum 

Nichols, H, S Louisville 

Norville, C. S Durham 

Olive, W. S Apex, R. 3 

Overby, L. W West Durham 

Plybon, C. T Durham 

Ross, Clarence Cincinnati, Ohio 

Stone Apex, R. 4 

Stanerstreet, E. A Durham 

Watkins, George T Durham 

Welsh, J. Elwood, Th.D... Durham 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

C. P. Xorris, J. Elwoocl Welsh, H. F. Briiison, to serve 1 year each 
Martin W. Buck, W. E. Young, L. G. Cole, to serve two years each 
T. M. Green, J. C. Markham, Walter M. Williams, to serve 3 years 
each. 



COMMITTEE ON ORDER OF BUSINESS 
T. M. Green, L. G. Cole, W. E. Young. 



MESSENGERS 

To Southern Baptist Convention — J. Ehvood Welsh. Alternate, 

E. L. Baskins. 
To Baptist State Convention— T. M. Green. 



REPORTS FOR NEXT SESSION 

Suhject Reported T)ij Diseiissed dy 

Associational Missions J. C. Canipe W. R. Beach. 

Foreign Missions George T. Watkins E. L. Baskins. 

State Missions C. S. Norville R. P. Ellington. 

Home Missions Martin W. Buck J. A. Brindell. 

Orphanage C. L. Haywood B. W. Rogers. 

Biblical Recorder S. W. Andrews H. G. l4)ossett. 

Ministerial Relief C. T. Plybon T. Elwood Welsh. 

Christian Education E. C. Dean Trela D. Collins. 

Sunday Schools Walter M. Williams H. F. Brinson. 

Woman's Work Mrs. Martin W. Buck L. E. M. Freeman. 

Temperance h. G. Cole G. T. Mills. 

B. Y. P. U T. B. Davis T. M. Green. 



ENROLLMENT 

Messengers from the churches enrolled as follows : 

Antioch — R. L. Smith, James Shanon. 

Bells— R. H. Mills. 

Berea— C. R. McHaney, J. M. Shepherd. 

Berry's Grove— H. H. Gates, Mrs. H. H. Gates. 

Bethel— G. W. Lloyd, G. W. Garrett, T. AV. Booker. 

Bethesda— W. M. Ferrell, W. J. Markham, D. H. Stallings, Mrs. J. W. 
Edgerton. 

Burlington, First — None enrolled. 

Burlington, Hocutt Memorial — N. A. Gregg, Jesse Holt, . W. P. Wil- 
liamson, W. T. Hensha\Y, Rosa Patterson, Mamie Durham. Fan- 
nie Williamson, Mrs. T. A. Allison, Mrs. N. A. Gregg. 

Burlington, Glencoe — G. L. Murray, Ivey Shaw, Hazel Murray, Bula 
Robinson. 

Gane Greek— G. H. Gates. 

Garrboro— B. F. Ray, Mrs. B. F. Ray, Norman Phillips, E. P. Elling- 
ton. 

Gedar Fork— I. S. Barbee, Paul Walton, H. M. O'Neil, Exum Walton. 

Ghapel Hill— R. A. Eubanks, J. M. Gheek, S. W. Andrews. 

Gross Roads — Bryant Garr, J. A. Jones. 

Durham, East — W. E. Young, Ola Morris. 

Durham, Edgemont— W. H. Bright, L. V. Byrd, E. T. Herndon. Mrs. 
E. T. Herndon, W. B. Rogers, Mrs. John Stone, Mrs. G. G. May. 

Durham, First— J. T. Salmon, P. D. Ross, L. G. Gole, R. E. Hurst, 
Hoke Barker, Mrs. W. M. Williams, E. A. Stanerstreet, B. W. 
Rogers. 

Durham, Grace — J. G. Roberts, K. U. Bryant, G. E. Isaacs. 

Durham, Lakewood — F. A. Ward, J. P. Sykes. 

Durham, Temple — A. M. Kirkland, J. J. Watson. 

Durham, West— G. M. Hight, W. P. Ward, Mrs. T. M. Green, Mrs. 
Thomas Gates, J. R. Wallace, J. J. Walker, G. S. Green. 

Efland— T. W. Riley, R. B. Studebaker. 

Ebenezer — A. O. Gates, Sudie Garrard. 

Ephesus — S. M. Pope, Alma Pope, Glifton Blackwood. 

Gorman — H. T. Gooch. 

Graham — None enrolled. 

Hillsboro, First— A. S. Mitchel, J. M. Garr. 

Hillsboro, West Hill^ — None enrolled. 

Haw River — None enrolled. 

Lowe's Grove — T. L. Pendergrass, Mrs. T. fe. Pendergrass, Mrs. J. L. 
Green, Mrs. M. M. Lowe. 

Lystra — M. Lindsay, James Oldham, Mrs. James Oldham. 

Mars Hill-^W. E. Oakley, W. O. Mincey. 

Mebane — W\ S. Grawford, J. M. Rimmer, J. M. Rimmer, Jr. 

Merry Oaks — None enrolled. 



6 Fifty-third Annual Session 

Moore's Chapel — None enrolled. 

Mount Ada — None enrolled. 

Mount Carmel — P. E. Johnson, Mrs. G. A. Hearne. 

Mount Gilead — Z. J. Johnson. 

Mount Hermon— E. F. Harris, J. E. Harris, J. D. Whitfield. 

Mount Moriah— W. T. Atkins, Mrs. W. T. Atkins, Flora Shepherd, 

J. T. Couch. 
Mount Pisgah— A. C. Scott, H. M. Lewter. 
Olive Branch— S. M. Suitt. 
Olive Chapel— W. G. Horton, L. M. Pickard. 
Pleasant Hill — None enrolled. 
Red Mountain — E. T. Mangum. 
Rose of Sharon— John L. Scott, J. G. Scott, James W. Scott, William 

Newton, J. K. Vaughn, Annie Hester, Georgie Newton. 
Robinson Grove — None enrolled. 
Sandy Level — ^Mrs. Vera Ferrell. 
Swepsonville— -Claude Phillips, A. J. Lemons. 
Yates — James W. Pickett. 
McDuffie Memorial— J. O. Franklin, J. W. Wright. 

The following pastors in the Association enrolled : 
E. L. Raskins, W. R. Beech, H. F. Brinson, Martin W. Buck, C. E. 
Byrd, Trela D. Collins, J. C. Canipe, J. B. Davis, E. C. Dean, H. G. 
Dossett, T. M. Green, R. S. Lennon, J. F. MacDuffie, G. T. Mills, 
Charles S. Norville, W. S. Olive. C. T. Plybon, George T. Watkins, 
J. Elwood Welsh, J. A., Brindell, L. E. M. Freeman. 

Note. — Doubtless other messengers were present than those in the 
above list ; if so, their enrollment slips failed to get to the Clerk. 



PROCEEDINGS 



I 



Durham, :N^. C, R. Xo. 2, October 10, 1922. 

The Mount Zion Baptist Association, in its fifty-third 
annnal session, convened with Rose of Sharon Church, and 
was called to order at 10 a. m. bj Moderator W. S. Olive. 

Rev. C. E. Byrd being absent, Rev. Trela D. Collins, of 
Durham, led the devotional exercises, reading John 15. 

Report of the Committee on Order of Business was 
adopted. 

Tellers were, appointed for enrolling messengers, and 
ninety-eight were reported as enrolled. 

Officers were elected, as follows : 

Moderator — Rev. W. S. Olive, Apex. 

Vice-Moderator, Walter M. Williams, Burlington. 

Clerk— W. O. Williams, Durham. 

Treasurer — J. ]N^. Cheek, East Durham. 

Auditor — S. W. Andrews, Chapel Hill. 

Historian — Rev. J. F. MacDuffiie, Chapel Hill. 

The Biblical Recorder Avas reported and discussed by Rev. 
R. T. Vann, and adopted. 

Sunday Schools was reported by Rev. Trela D. Collins, 
and ably discussed by Bro. E. L. Middleton, and adopted. 

The introductory sermon was preached by Rev. E. C. Dean, 
Burlinglon, from the text in Philippians 3 :10 — "That I may 
know him, and the power of his resurrection, and the fellows- 
ship of his sufferings, being made conformable unto his 
death," the subject being "Unknown in Christ." 

The Moderator announced the Committee on Finance — 
J. ^T. Cheek, Walter M. Williams, R. T. Shipp. 



8 Fifty-third An^^ual Sessio^t 

On motion, a committee of three - — J. E. Welsh, J. F. 
MacDiiffie, T. M. Green — were appointed to draft resohitions 
to the memory of Auditor R. T. Howerton, and they offered 
the following : 

Whereas, Bro, R. T. Howerton, senior deacon of the First Church 
of Diirliam, was called to his heavenly home during this past asso- 
ciational year ; and 

Whereas, Brother Howerton had been elected Auditor of the Asso- 
ciation for life, and always manifested a deep and abiding interest 
in the affairs of the Association ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Mount Zion Association go on record as ex- 
pressing its thankfulness to the Heavenly Father for blessing this 
body with the presence of so sweet a character as Brother Howerton, 
whose life was a beautiful exemplification of that highest of all lives, 
and that a copy of this resolution be sent to the family of Brother 
Howerton. 

J. Elwood Welsh, 
J. F. MacDuffie, 
T. M. Green, 

Committee. 

Xew pastors and visitors were recognized, as follows : Pas- 
tors — C. T. Plybon, Lakewood; George T. Watkins, Grace; 
Trela J). Collins, Temple; Charles S. Is'orville, Edgemont; 
W. R. Beech, Hillsboro ; J. A. Brindell, Yates ; J. C. Canipe, 
Mebane ; G. T. Mills, Lowe's Grove. Visitors — A. C. 
Hanby, Associational Organizer ; F. B. Hamrick, Treasurer 
Baptist Orphanage; E. L. Middleton, General Secretary; 
Dr. R. T. Vann, Rev. George T. Tilley, Rev. R. E. Cox. 

Adjourned one hour for dinner, which was graciously 
served on the grounds. 

Afteenoon Session 

Devotional exercises were led by Rev. W. R. Beech, of 

Hillsboro. 

The Moderator appointed the following committees : 

To dominate the Executive Committee — E. C. Dean, 

Iv. U. Bryant, E. A. Ward, J. M. Rimmer. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 9 

To j^ominate Messenger to Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion— L. G. Cole,-S. M. Suitt, J. C. Eoberts. 

To I^ominate Messenger to Baptist State Convention — 
T. M. Green, C. K. McHanej, T. W. Eiley. 

Committee on Place and Preacher — J. T. Salmon, W. G. 
Horton, J. W. Pickett. 

Eev. George T. Watkins read the report on Christian Edu- 
cation, which was elaborately discussed by Dr. E. T. Vann, 
and adopted. 

S. W. Andrews read the report on Ministerial Belief, 
which was discussed by Eev. J. B. Davis, and adopted. 

Home Missions was reported by Eev. W. E. Beech, which 
was discussed at length by Eev. C. T. Plybon, and adopted. 

Mrs. Martin W. Buck was reported sick and unable to 
attend the Association; so Mrs. G. T. Isaacs read the report 
on Woman's Missionary Unioi]. It was discussed by George 
T. Watkins, T. M. Green, and E. T. Vann, and adopted. 

State Missions was reported by Eev. C. S. I^orville and 
was discussed at length by A. C. Hanby and W. E. Beech, 
and adopted. 

The report on the Baptist Orphanage was read by Eev. 
Trela D. Collins and was aptly discussed by F. B. Hamrick, 
Treasurer of the Orphanage, and adopted. 

Dr. D. B. Bryant, of Wake Forest College, was recognized. 

On motion, a suggested form of organization for the Bap- 
tist Associations was referred to the Executive Committee. 

Announcements, and adjournment till 10 a. m. Wednesday 
morning. 

Wednesday — Moening Session 

At 10 o'clock a. m. the Association met according to ad- 
journment. Impressive devotional services were conducted 
by Eev. J. C. Canipe. 

A petition for the admittance of McDuffie Memorial Bap- 
tist Church to the Mount Zion Association was read, and the 



10 FiFTY-THIED ANNUAL SeSSION 

Moderator referred it to the following committee : J. Elwood 
Welsh, E. L. Baskins, and T. M. Green for reconunendation. 

The report on B. Y. P. U. was made by Patrick D. Ross, 
of Durham, and was commented on by T. M. Green, J. C. 
Canipe, and E. A. Stanerstreet, and adopted. 

The report on Temperance was read by Pev. P. S. Lennon, 
and spiritedly discussed by H. G. Dossett, C. T. Plybon, 
T. M. Green, J. C. Canipe, and Peuben Shipp, and adopted. 

Foreign Missions was reported by Pev. E. C. Dean, and 
ably discussed by J. Elwood Welsh and E. C. Dean, and 
adopted. 

Rev. J. E. Brown, Ansted, W. Va., was recognized. 

The Reinforcement Campaign was brought before the 
Association by Rev. W. P. Beech. 

The Treasurer made his report. 

Dismission for dinner, which was again served bountifully 
on the grounds. 

Wednesday — Afternoon Session 

Devotional services were led by Rev. H. E. Brinson. 

Rev. P. E. White and Pev. J. A. Beam, of the Beulah 
Association, was recognized. 

The Historian's report follow^ed, and was adopted, with 
comments by Rev. J. A. Beam. 

Dr. Carl P. ^N^orris read the report on Associational Mis- 
sions. It was discussed by E. A. Ward, C. T. Plybon, Walter 
M. Williams, B. W. Rogers, and H. G. Dossett, and adopted. 

J. T. Salmon reported for the Committee on Time, Place, 
and Preacher for next session : Place — Mount Moriah Church 
(one hundredth anniversary), Durham County, 6 miles west 
of Durham. Time — Tuesday after second Sunday in Octo- 
ber, 1923, at 10 a. m. Preacher — C. T. Plybon ; alternate, 
J. B. Davis. A two-day session was adopted by the Associa- 
tion. 

On recommendation of the committees, the following mes- 
sengers were elected : 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 11 

Southern Baptist Convention — J. Elwood Welsh ; alter- 
nate, E. L. Baskins. 

State Baptist Convention — T. M. Green. 

Kev. Trela D. Collins offered the f ollow^ing resolution : 

Be it resolved by the Mount Zion Association here assembled, That 
its heartiest thanks be extended to the Rose of Sharon Church and 
its pastor for the generous hospitality to the messengers and visitors 
during this session of the Association. 

It was unanimously adopted by a rising vote. 

The Committee on Finance reported, through its chairman, 
J. N". Cheek, and the report was adopted. 

Bro. J. A. Beam,- of the Beulah Association, made a strong 
plea for some of the churches in this Association to join the 
Beulah Association. 

The committee appointed to consider the petition for the 
admittance of the new church reported, through its chairman, 
J. Elwood Welsh, favorably, and recommended that McDufiie 
Memorial Baptist Church be admitted to the Association. 
The report was adopted. 

The Committee on Digest of Church Letters was continued. 

o 

The Association then adjourned to meet with Mount 
Moriah Church, October 16, 1923. 

W. S. Olive^ Moderator. 
W. O. Williams, Clerk. 

REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE 

We, your Finance Committee, beg leave to make the following 
report : 

Minute Fund $146.05 

Associational Missions 253.00 

75 Million 1,184.14 

Orphanage 5.15 

$1,588.34 

J. N. Cheek, 

W. M. Williams, 

R. T. Shipp. 



12 Fifty-third Anjn^ual Sessio]st 



REPORT ON BAPTIST YOUNG PEOPLE'S WORK 

The Baptist Young People's Union is the training scliool of the 
Church. For this reason, we recommend it to every church in this 
Association. The work is going forward in our State, as shown by 
the figures lierewith : 

There are 925 Unions in the State. 

Two liundred new Unions have been organized since our State Con- 
vention met last June, 

Twenty-two hundred and twelve Study Courses have been given as 
the result of the summer campaign recently put on by the State Con- 
vention. B. Y. P. U. Institutes are in constant progress. 

There are nine City Unions and seventeen Associational B. Y. P. U. 
organizations in North Carolina. 

In Mount Zion Association we have twenty-three Senior Unions, 
six Intermediate Unions, and ten Junior Unions. 

Several new Unions have been organized that have not been re- 
ported, and our young people are constantly looking for new fields of 
activity. The young people can be counted on for loyal service at 
any time. 

The State-wade Reinforcement Campaign will be a success, for the 
reason that the young people will do their utmost to further the 
work of encouraging the payment of the pledges and securing pledges 
from the unpledged members in our churches. 

We recommend that every church in the Association having no 
Baptist Young People's Union take immediate steps to have a Union 
organized. Respectfully submitted, 

Patrick D. Ross. 

HISTORIANS REPORT, 1922 

PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Pleasant Grove Church came into the Mount Zion Association at 
its first meeting after the organization. It came in by petitionary 
letter from the Sandy Creek Association when it met at Mount Pis- 
gah Church, September 22, 1871. 

From what we can ascertain from the minutes, it seems to have 
been actively engaged in Christian service, co-operative with the 
Baptist State Convention, for twenty years. At the meeting of the 
session at Sandy Level Church in 1885 we find the name appears on 
the minutes with a representative delegation, but after this it seems 
to have disbanded or changed its name, as we have no account of the 
name appearing in the minutes after that. It was served during 
these years by Brethren M. S. Ferrell, J. P. Mason, J. C. W^ilson, and 
George P. Moore as pastors. After this, it seems, other churches 
began building up around it, and the church disappears entirely from 
the minutes of our Association. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 17 

planning, there is no more worthy cause than the care of these old 
soldiers, whose eyes are dimmed with years of patient service, whose 
faces are turned to life's sunset, soon to pass to the great beyond. 
Let each Association in our State see that no worthy old soldier fails 
to get the proper care and comforts, and may God grant that, as we 
march onward in our work, none of us may ever forget the faithful 
old soldier who blazed the way for the great things of today. 

Respectfully submitted, 

S. W. Andrews. 

HOME MISSIONS 

The Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, 
located at Atlanta, Ga., is doing work under its various phases 
throughout the bounds of the Southern Baptist Convention, including 
Cuba and the Canal Zone. The report made at Jacksonville last May 
is a record of wonderful achievements. 

The million-dollar mark was reached in the Church Building Loan 
Fund, which is loaned to churches in the erection of church buildings. 

The past year was the greatest in soul-saving and in the enlistment 
of our forces in the work of the Kingdom, many of our fields becom- 
ing self-supporting. 

The board's work is done under the following departments : Co- 
operative Missions, Enlistment, Evangelism, Mountain Schools, For- 
eigners, Indians and Negroes, Cuba, Panama, Soldiers and Seamen, 
Publicity, Southern Baptist Sanatorium, and Church Extension. 

The board for two years has been heavily in debt, because of the 
enlargement of the work at the beginning of the Seventy-five Million 
Campaign and the financial depression, but these conditions are im- 
proving, and the board is encouraged to believe that its receipts will 
be in advance of those for last year, and thus make it possible to 
lessen the debt and turn its forces toward the larger opportunities 
that are found on every hand. 

Free literature, in the way of tracts and leaflets, can be had on 
application to the Home Mission Board, 1004 Healy Building, 
Atlanta, Ga. W. R. Beech. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Christian Education is a term used to describe that conception of 
education which places it under Christian training. Christian guard- 
ianship and Christian influence. It is the designation of a view as 
distinct from secular education, which education has not such ex- 
cellent surrounding its giving or impartation. The kingdom of 
God believes that the kingdom of education is to become the 
kingdom of our Lord and his Christ. It believes this intellectual 
kingdom is to become Christian through the leaven of the gospel 
as all other kingdoms must. Hence Christiandom is trying to im- 
plant and work out that idea today through Christian education 



18 FlFTY-THIED AnNUAL SeSSION 

ill the educational world. Christian education does not propose 
new curriculums or courses of training in academies or colleges, 
but to have the educational world accepted curriculums or courses 
of instruction taught by devout and pious Christian men and women 
in a profound Christian atmosphere where faith is supreme and 
all knowledge is imported in the fear of God. Owing to our form 
of government and belief in the absolute separation of church and 
state the churches believe that this form and conception of edu- 
cation can be taught only in denominational schools. Hence our 
academies and colleges under Baptist control and support. These 
are our dynamic forces to give to the educational world our belief 
and conception of Christian education. Your Committee appeals 
to you to take a survey of Christian education today and find 
it's present status. Then make a survey of your academies and 
colleges and find their present standing and needs and act accord- 
ingly. This pointer please, Christian education is being put to 
the test today as never before and is in greater need than ever 
before. 

Your committee, therefore, recommends : 

1. That we continue to keep, regardless of price of equipment 
and impartation, our curriculums, courses of study and degrees 
on a par with all institutions of learning doing similar work both 
Christian or secular. 

2. That, we stress with major emphasis the Christian features 
of education. 

3. That, we strive to find a way to make Christian education 
more attractive to the patrons of the educational world. 

4. That, we strive to develop in our denomination a greater loyalty 
to Christian education and our own denominational schools. 

5. That, the more than three hundred thousand Baptists of North 
Carolina stand as one in the support of our schools with both 
patronage and purse. 

Geo. T. Watkins, 

Committee. 

REPORT ON ORPHANAGE 

The response to the call of destitute children has crystalized 
into institutions which we call orphanages. Here thousands of 
loving hearts have been centered for many years. With pardonable 
pride we as Baptists look back upon a great achievement in the 
past, and upon a present which gives cause for thanksgiving. 

No appeal so stirs and Avarms the heart, as the uplifted hands 
of a childhood robbed of the protecting care of parent or parents. 
After the pattern of our Lord it should be a great joy for Christian 
people to take the helpless children up in the arms of their best 
love, and bless them to the limit of their ability. 

Since we as individuals could have done practically nothing in 
so vast a field of need, the calling into being of these wonderful 



Mount Zion Baptist Associatiox 19 

institutions has resulted iu untold good. No statistician can ever 
tabulate the great good done at Thomasville and Kennedy Home. 
A single visit to one of these places will make one's heart swell 
with gratitude. 

Our denomination is indeed fortunate to have at the head of 
these orphanages, men in whom we have implicit confidence. Under 
the leadership of these men of God, a band of Christian teachers 
and workers are doing an indescribable glorious piece of work. By 
the transforming touch of love, sad tear-stained faces are changed 
into smiling countenances. Lives that otherwise would be aimless, 
are anchored to a purpose, and the boys and girls are trained 
for a Christian citizenship of a high order. Certainly such work 
stands near the top of life's greatest achievement. 

The hundreds of successful men and women who received their 
training iu these institutions, are a living comentary upon the 
quality of the work done. Those who enter college from the 
orphanage as a rule make good, and in a large number of cases 
stand out conspicuously as bright lights. 

Notwithstanding the fact that our orphanages are caring for 
more than six hundred children, (to be exact, 684) there are 
hundreds of outstretched hands which they cannot reach. While 
we as Baptists have done well iu tlie past, yet the need is great 
and the call is urgent to redouble our efforts to do still greater 
things in this benevolent service. We should never be satisfied 
until we equip these institutions that they may adequately care 
for all the cases which we should logically reach. 

As great as these institutions are and as well as they are equipped 
there are some limitations. Where there are so many, individual 
attention is of necessity limited. Then too, motherly love and 
sympathy, that greatest of all relationships, cannot be administered 
by proxy. No institution nor individual can take the place of a 
compitent mother. Where it is at all possible to maintain the 
home and let the child have the benefit of a mother's love and care 
disruption should be the last resort. Realizing this fact Dr. Kesler, 
who is a recognized leader in child welfare work, is doing some- 
thing along this line (133), and hopes to develop this scheme to 
the point where a mother worthy of the name may not be forced 
by circumstances to part with her child and entrust it to strange 
hands. This plan of course must be persued with the greatest of 
care. The instrument for its execution is the local church, and 
every church should be willing, and even glad to cooperate with 
Dr. Kesler in this great department. 

In this high day denominational work, there is little need to 
urge the support of this department which lies nearest to our 
hearts. All that is necessary is to state that we have not ac- 
complished the task, and that all that we can turn into the orphan- 
age can be wisely used in meeting the ever increasing need. 

Trela D. Collins. 



20 Fifty-third An^stual SESSioiq" 



REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS 

We are grateful to Almighty God for His guidance and for 
the signal blessings which have rested on our work in so many 
ways. Each branch of work has operated effectively during the 
past year. The field of possibilities was almost unlimited, for 
our work is broad, and in its ramifications touches various lines 
of religious endeavor. Indeed, it is not possible to give in statistical 
form a correct idea of what is accomplished each year by the 
missionaries and other workers within the borders of our State. 
Not only in purely religious ways is the effect of the labors seen. 
Our workers are tireless friends to the great cause of Christ. 

Notwithstanding the financial depression the denomination as a 
whole has been steadfast in its purpose to carry the campaign to a 
successful issue. Payments delayed we believe will be met when 
conditions make it possible. We have unfailing confidence in the 
integrity of our Baptist brotherhood. 

The work of conservation and enlistment under the direction 
of the General Secretary has been carried on with sustained effort 
and with all the wisdom and discretion at his command. Constant 
effort has been made to keep up the morale of the churches. The 
same lines of work carried on last year have' claimed our attention 
this year, promoting collection of pledges, further enlistment and 
emphasis upon stewardship, tithing, church efliciency and finance. 

SOME RESULTS OF THE CAMPAIGN 

North Carolina's pledges for the five years is about $7,000,000.00. 
Our quota for one year is $1,228,000.00. November 30th will com- 
plete three years of campaign work. The amount due for these 
three years is $3,684,000.00. More than $3,000,000.00 have been paid. 

The campaign in North Carolina has been very successful when 
we think of the unrest, and the financial depression. This great 
task has turned the eyes of the people upon us in a great way. 
Sunday-schools are larger, preaching services are more largely at- 
tended, the B. Y. P. TJ.'s and Missionary Societies are growing and 
the future is full of wonderful possibilities. 

The work of the various departments may be summed up in 
brief as follows: 

The Department of Missionary-Pastoral Assistance — There are 
about 210 missionary-pastors in the employ of the State Mission 
Board. These men receive from $5.00 to $175.00 per month. The 
payroll for missionaries alone Is $5,000.00 per month. Good preachers 
and pastors are being placed in each school community whether 
it be a Baptist or State school. 

Sunday-school Department — We have a secretary, two field secre- 
taries and an elementary worker. Splendid progress in this depart- 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 21 

ment is being made. We have 2,225 Baptist Sunday-scliools in 
North Carolina, while we have a little less than 2,300 Baptist 
churches. 

Baptist Young People's Work — This work is going forward by 
leaps and bounds. There are over 900 unions in the State. The 
B. Y. P. U. aim for this year is 500 new unions. 

Enlistment Department — This department has been doing fine 
work among the country churches. Of the 2,300 churches in North 
Carolina about 1,800 are country churches. We have a superin- 
tendent of enlistment with about five men under him. Their task 
is to lend all the assistance possible to the country church. A 
number of new fields have been formed and good pastors placed 
on them. 

Church Building — This department is endeavoring to provide ade- 
quate church and Sunday-school equipment at every school center 
and all growing towns. These centers are looked upon as being 
strategic. We must hang our heads in shame because we have 
been so negligent in the past to make these provisions. 

Evangelism — This organization has a superintendent and three 
men under him. It is useless to say that this department has 
functioned splendidly during the past year. "Many such as should 
be saved have been added to the churches." When the full reports 
are compiled it is probably that this will be shown to be one, if 
not our greatest year of soul winning. 

Book Department — This department has been organized more than 
one year and has served the denomination in a great way. All that 
is made on books goes back into the work of State Missions. 

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE 

It is manifest that we will not reach our full quota in payments 
of subscriptions by November 30th. There is nothing, however, 
which would presage the ultimate failure of our compaign. Not- 
withstanding the depression that has prevailed our achievements 
have far surpassed those of pre-Campaign years. Every interest 
fostered by our denomination has-, doubtless been cared for more 
adequately than it would have been but for the higher standard 
of giving achieved in the campaign. We need to consecrate our- 
selves afresh to the task before us adhering strictly to the plans 
of the campaign and looking most of all to Almighty God for His 
help and guidance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Chas. S. Norville, 
Committee. 



22 FiFTY-TiiiED Annual Session 



BIBLICAL RECORDER 

People cannot be expected to take interest in anything unless 
they know something about it. This fact is recognized in every 
relation of life. Business men realize the fact that to succeed in 
business they must advertise, and advertising is simply keeping 
people informed as to any special line of business. 

Political parties know the importance of imparting information 
and hand-books are published giving many facts, and some things, 
at times that may not be facts but which are impressive and influence 
votes. 

Fakirs of all sorts and in all lines use the printed page with 
telling effect in exploiting their wares. Tlie propagandists of false 
doctrines depend upon literature as upon no other agency for getting 
their cults before the public, as witness Russellism and Christian 
Science. 

Christian people profess to believe that the interests of Christ's 
kingdom are more important than anything else in all the world, 
and yet they are satisfied to know less about it than about almost 
anything else. The doctrines of the New Testament are of eternal 
importance' because they have to do with the things of the soul, 
and yet many Christians are more familiar with the principles 
of the political party with which they affiliate than they are with 
the great doctrine of grace. 

Secular papers can be found in many Christian homes into which 
no religious paper goes. There are, according to reliable informa- 
tion, five hundred thousand Baptist homes in the South into which 
the denominational paper does not go, while only 150,000 receive 
the denominational papers. Estimating five readers to the home, 
only 750,000 of our 3,000,000 read the denominational paper, leav- 
ing 2,250,000 who do not get the important information contained 
in the Baptist papers. 

In North Carolina, according to the estimates used for the South, 
we have 65,227 homes into 3,500 of which the Recorder finds its 
way. Of the 300,000 Baptists in the State only 75,000 read the 
Recorder week by week leaving 225,000 who do not avail them- 
selves of this the only way of keeping informed about the affairs 
of our denomination. 

Aside from the value of the Recorder as a denominational agency, 
the paper would be an inestimable blessing to the homes of our 
people. In this day when dangerous and deadly doctrine is being 
scattered like autumn leaves, and is finding its way into every 
home, we owe it to our children to put within their reach wholesome 
literature such as is found in our religious papers. The Biblical 
Recorder is a family paper, giving matter that is suited for every 
member of the family, and the cost is only two dollars a year. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 23 

There is a Southwide movement now to increase tlie circulation 
of the Baptist papers in the South. As the Recorder had on a 
campaign last spring we have not pressed the campaign now being 
waged, but we hope the Recorder will not lose its place as third 
in the list of Southern Baptist papers so far as circulation is 
concerned. We trust that all the associations yet to meet will give 
serious consideration to the matter of increasing the circulation 
of this important kingdom agency. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. S. Crawford. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

Southern Baptists are not a provincial people. Our Foreign Mis- 
sion work is now represented in sixteen countries of the world. 
These sixteen countries have a population twenty-five times as large 
as that within the bounds of the Southern Baptist Convention. 
As we think of the present strength of our Foreign Mission work, 
may we lay along side of this a field containing twenty-five persons 
to every one in our Southern States. 

The work of our Board has its greatest strength in China. In 
this country the work is divided into five great Missions. This 
covers six provinces in China with a population greater than that 
of our own country, and leaves twelve provinces in which we have 
no work. Out of the 462 missionaries supported by our Foreign 
Mission Board in all lands, over half, to be exact 253, labor in 
China. 

Japan, our other Far-East field with a population twice as large 
as the Southern States is occupied with twenty-eight missionaries 
of our Board. The work prospers in Japan. This country highly 
developed in many ways, calls for immediate strengthening of our 
forces. 

Our Foreign Mission work reaches into four countries in South 
America, where our forces are strongest in Brazil. We have 98 
missionaries! in Brazil, and it ranks second in number of church 
members. There are 20,614 members of our churches in Brazil and 
26,577 members in China, our oldest field. The loyalty of the 
people is seen from the fact that in Argentina, a comparatively new 
field, gifts from Argentine Baptists last year were more per capita 
than from Baptists in the Southern Baptist Convention. Their gifts 
last year were $23.50 and ours $10.62. 

Likewise good reports come from the African Mission, where the 
"present difficulty is not to advance work, but to keep up with what 
is already being done." 

The work in Italy has experienced a prosperous year. "The 
acquisition of the fine property in Rome for a church, missionaries' 



24 Fifty-third Annual Session 

homes, and publication headquarters has greatly increased our 
effiency there." The Board has also purchased a splendid site for 
an orphanage. 

During the past year new fields in Europe have been greatly 
strengthened. Dr. Everett Gill is in charge of the work there. 
Rev. H. E. Porter, our first missionary in Russia, is beginning 
effectively in connection with the American Relief Administration. 

Baptists are again fostering work in Palistine, to which country 
four missionaries were appointed at the last Convention. 

Looking at the fields collectively, our Foreign Mission work is 
represented with 622 churches, having a membership of 64,251. Of 
this number one-third of the churches, or 206 are self-supporting, 
and 375 or more than one-half, own their house of worship. In 
addition we have 694 schools with an enrollment of 26,507 students. 
The latter is a great channel in winning the lost. An outstanding 
missionary says "fifty per cent of our church members in China 
are reached in the schools." Great emphasis is laid on the Sunday- 
school where there is an enrollment of over 53,000. Last year 
there were 7,891 baptisms, almost 1,000 more than during any 
previous year. 

Of the 50 new missionaries appointed last May, three come from 
North Carolina. They are : Miss Katie Murray of Rose Hill, a 
Meredith College and Training School graduate, and Rev. L. E. 
Blackman and wife. Brother Blackman is a Wake Forest and 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary graduate. Mrs. Blackman 
is likewise well qualified and is a grand-neice of the late Dr. Mat- 
thew T. Yates. 

A total of 208 new missionaries have already been sent out since 
the inauguration of the 75 Million Campaign, in addition to the 
number going out this season. 

During the past year the Foreign Mission Board purchased a 
new^ headquarters building in Richmond. This cost $100,000.00 and 
was given for this purpose by Mr. and Mrs. George W. Bottoms 
of Arkansas. 

Our Corresponding Secretary, Dr. Love, says that the "most dis- 
couraging feature of our Foreign Mission work last year came not 
from the fields abroad, but from the response to this cause here at 
home." Southern Baptists gave during the last year $1,755,678.00 
as against $2,498,381.00 year before last. This is a drop in Foreign 
Missions of $742,703.00 in one year. Our work abroad has been 
greatly expanded and the outcome would be tragic if its support 
is cut down this year like it was last. 

Our missionaries on foreign soil are not only our Lord's ambassa- 
dors but they are our representatives. We must see that this glori- 
ous work goes forward. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. C. Dean. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 26 



REPORT ON ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONS 

We point with pride to a number of strong churches that were 
formerly supported by our Associational Mission Board, among 
these are East Durham, Edgemont, Mebane, Carrboro and several 
others. 

This year West Hill became self-supporting besides finishing pay- 
ing its church debt, also Hocutt Memorial declined further assistance 
and reports a gain of forty-seven members and contributions of 
$8,021.00 for the year. At present we are aiding Graham, Hillsboro, 
Mars Hill, Efland and Lakewood churches. 

Our Board granted an appropriation of $100.00 to the Womans 
Missionary Union and a committee consisting of Mrs. M. W. Buck, 
Mrs. Walter M. Williams, and Mrs. E. L. Baskin, freely giving 
their time, did some splendid work, traveling 2,641 miles, mailing 
1,387 letters and cards, attending 27 meetings and organizing 10 
new societies. 

Our Associational Mission work deserves the hearty support of 
all the churches within our bounds. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Gael Norris, 
Chairman Executive Committee. 

SUNDAY-SCHOOL REPORT 

Baptist Sunday-schools were never in a more prosperous condition 
than now. The three years of the 75 Million Campaign have been 
a period of great growth and development. Last year showed the 
most marvelous growth of all, with 234,000 net gain in the South 
and 26,700 in North Carolina. There is a growing spirit of optimism 
and a general desire for larger and better Sunday-schools. 

In organization and equipment it is impossible to tabulate the 
improvement, but it is evident everywhere. In the recent superin- 
tendents' Conferences there were 156 superintendents present. Forty- 
six of these are building new houses for their Sunday-schools or 
remodeling old ones to get room for their schools. The improvement 
in grading and general organization is evident everywhere. We have 
more Standard schools than ever before. 

We are working along general policies agreed upon at the last 
State Convention. These policies involve the taking of a religious 
census with a follow-up canvass, in the hope that this year we may 
gain 30,000 in the membership of our schools. We are working for 
adequate organization and equipment in every school. We are 
striving diligently to train our teachers through the Normal Course. 
We are trying to organize our classes of intermediates, young people 
and adults. There are unlimited possibilities in this general pro- 
gram barely mentioned here. 



26 Fifty-third Annual Session 

The last State Convention authorized a great rural campaign. 
It has been put on even more effectively and largely than was at 
first planned. During the three months — June 5 to September 5 — 
fifteen special workers cooperated with the regular workers. Dur- 
ing this time some of the results were as follows : 

Number of Institutes 271 

Churches Represented 496 

Total Enrollment 10,114 

Visitors of Others Attending 8,225 

Examinations 2,030 

Enrolled in Correspondence Course 1,654 

In this rural program one-half of all the expenses were paid by 
the Baptist Sunday-school Board, Nashville Tennessee. 

The regular workers are busy all the time on general policies and 
plans. 

We have come upon a time when the Sunday-school is not only 

being looked upon as a great evangelistic opportunity, but as great 

an opportunity in Christian service. The outlook was never so bright 

and hopeful. 

K. U. Bryan, 

T. D. Collins, 

Committee. 

PETITIONARY LETTER FOR ADMITTANCE INTO THE MOUNT 
ZION BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, CONVENING AT ROSE OF 
SHARON BAPTIST CHURCH, DURHAM COUNTY, N. C. 

To the Association, G^reetings: 

Dear Brethren : The section of Orange County located near Black- 
wood Station, on Chapel Hill and University Railroad, within the 
bounds of the Mount Zion Association, surrounded by Mount Moriah, 
Bethel, Carrboro, Mount Hermon, and Ephesus churches, has been 
destitute of Baptist preaching ever since the flood. Each of these 
churches have members who have recently moved into this section 
and planted themselves, but they are four, five, and seven and eight 
miles from their churches, away from Baptist influences and growing 
families, and, to their sorrow and regret, some of their children have 
gone to other denominations. It is estimated that about half, or 
over, of a denomination in the community are Baptist inclined. Of 
this denomination's Sunday-school, the superintendent, some of the 
teachers, and one-half, or more, of the scholars are from Baptist 
homes. 

Realizing our loss in this direction, as Baptists, and seeing the 
need of a Baptist church located somewhere in this section, to take 
care of the children and our spiritual needs as Baptists, we solicited 
the pastor of Bethel Church to come over and help us. He labored 
with us for six days. The result was the organization of a Baptist 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 27 

church by him, and a special committee appointed by Bethel Church, 
with about twenty-five members and about eighteen or twenty others, 
soon to come into the organization. 

We most earnestly and respectfully ask admittance into your mem- 
bership as a church, and your help in trying to plant and establish a 
church in this section of our Association. 

J. F. MacDuffie, Moderator. 

J. W. Weight, Clerk pro tern. 

REPORT OF THE WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION OF THE 
MOUNT ZION BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

In looking back over the past year's work, two outstanding facts 
confront us, and we pause for just a moment to mention them. They 
are sacrificial service and willing co-operation. For these we thank 
the Giver of every good and perfect gift. 

Our working forces have been increased by giving us an Executive 
Committee, the members of which have rendered valuable aid in 
directing the work. All officers elected one year ago have been 
called upon to serve another year, with the exception of Mrs. W. J. 
Crain, who has been called to labor elsewhere in the Master's vine- 
yard. 

An all-day conference was conducted by our Auxiliary leaders, 
Mrs. E. L. Baskin and Mrs. W. M. Williams, at the Temple Baptist 
Church, June 27th, when eighty-nine delegates and visitors were 
present. This, we believe, is the first meeting of this kind held in 
our Association, and many felt that it was well worth while. 

September 12th, at the Yates Baptist Church, Durham, our annual 
meeting was held, and the interest was deep and general from the 
early morning until the close at 5 o'clock in the evening, when we 
adjourned. There were seventeen W. M. Societies represented, with 
an enrolled attendance of 128 ; also twenty-seven auxiliary organiza- 
tions reported, with fifty-four delegates, making a total of forty-four 
organizations, represented by 182 duly accredited delegates, which, 
with twenty-six visitors, gave us a total attendance of 208. 

We are prepared to give a report from each oflicer, but as we 
work together, organize together, we will present a joint summary 
of our work : 

Pages of literature sent out 60,368 

Programs mailed out 466 

Report blanks distributed 1,155 

Letters and postal cards sent out 672 

Churches visited 29 

Meetings attended 40 

Manuals distributed 36 

New societies organized 10 

Tithers' cards sent out 1,475 



28 Fifty-third Annual Session 

Conferences attended 12 

Telephone calls 156 

Miles traveled in tlie interest of the work 2,641 

Reports from the W. M. U. show that the women's con- 
tributions this past year on the Seventy-five Million Cam- 
paign totaled the sum of $26,599.59 

Contributed last year 26,314.45 

Contributed the first year 20,116.06 

Total for the three years $73,030.10 

There are twenty-five young -women from our State in training at 
Louisville, and we are grateful that of this number seven are from 
the Mount Zion Association, namely. Miss Annie Crutchfield, of Tem- 
ple Baptist Church; Miss Cora Lee Cannon, Miss Lula McGee, and 
Miss Dosia Watson, from West Durham Church ; Miss Nettie Page, 
of Cedar Fork Church ; and Miss Alva Lawrence, of Olive Chapel 
Church. 

After all of these years of waiting, our women decided that we 
should endeavor to secure a Training School scholarship for deserv- 
ing Mount Zion girls, and an effort is to be made at once to provide 
the sum of $200.00 as a nucleus for this purpose, so that we shall be 
able to aid at least some of our own deserving ones. 

The women of our Association have also decided to have at least 
one room in our new hospital at Winston-Salem to be known by our 
associational name ; and if our love gifts shall warrant it, we hope 
to furnish a ward with more than one bed. The room will cost 
$200.00, while an additional $100.00 will be required for each added 
bed in a ward. 

Our financial report stands as follows : 

Cash on hand, September 1, 1921 $16.00 

Expenditures for the year 116.80 

In treasury at close of annual meeting with Yates Baptist 

Church, September 12, 1922 68.30 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. Martin W. Buck. 

REPORT OF J. N. CHEEK, TREASURER OF MOUNT ZION 
ASSOCIATION, OCTOBER 2, 1922 

Amounts received from churches and Finance Committee for — 

Foreign Missions $68.38 

Home Missions 40.00 

State Missions ,. 55.50 

Association Missions 1,377.01 

Christian Education 55.00 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 29 

Ministers' Relief $50.00 

Minute Fund 199.40 

Orphanage 62.00 

Seventy-five Million 213.35 

Hospitals 10.00 

Amount on hand, last report 391.97 

Total $2,522.61 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Foreign Missions $68.38 

Home Missions 40.00 

State Missions 55.50 

Association Missions 1,380.56 

Christian Education 55.00 

Ministers' Relief 50.00 

Minutes and clerks' salaries 282.35 

Orphanage 62.00 

Seventy-five Million 213.35 

Hospitals 10.00 

Balance on hand 305.47 

Total $2,522.61 

O. K. S. W. Andrews, Auditor. 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE 

Brethren and Sisters : As a Christian nation we are out to win 
the race against the demons of intoxication, liquor and cigarettes. 
The liquor trafiic is purely an illegal and immoral business and is 
operated by an immoral class like Peter spoke of in 2 Peter 2 :10-14. 
This lawless gang that despise government need to be chased just as 
any other natural "brute beast" (the modern blind-tiger man) that 
lurks in the forest to destroy as many of the flock as he may, and 
must, when found, be .branded with the "coon stripes" to serve in the 
capacity of building a highway for the civilization that he strove so 
hard to blight and destroy. But I love the unfortunate fellow, re- 
gardless of all his sins, and I pity him. Therefore, as a Christian 
denomination, let us in Mount Zion Association use the effectual 
means of prayer, the preached Word, the Sunday-school, and the 
B. Y. P, U., also the press, to convict and convince him of his wrong. 

The cigarette fiend is like the blighted orchard tree — abnormal. 
The habit, acquired in childhood, hinders physical growth, mental 
growth, and spiritual growth. I love and pity this fellow, too. But 
that alone will not do. Let us begin at the house of God and create 
a sentiment against it, through the pulpit, the Sunday-school, and 
the B. Y. P. U. Respectfully submitted, 

R. S. Lennon. 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

Woman's Missionary Union 



The annual meeting of the Woman's Missionary Union of 
Mount Zion Association was held at Yates Church, Tuesday, 
September 12, 1922, beginning at 10 o'clock ; Mrs. Martin 
W. Buck, Superintendent, presiding. 

Mrs. G. E. Isaacs, of Grace Church, Durham, conducted 
the devotional exercises. 

The Constitution of the Association, and also the Standard 
of Excellence, Avere read by Mrs. E. L. Baskin, of Chapel 
Hill. 

Mrs. E. L. Baskins, associational leader of R. A. and 
Sunbeam work, made an encouraging report, and says that 
personal-service v/ork is gradually growing. 

Y. W. A. and G. A. work is steadily growing under the 
efficient leadership of Mrs. W. M. Williams, of Burlington, 
who made a fine report, which shows that most societies sent 
in their quarterly reports each quarter, and that means much 
to the progress of, and interest in, the work. 

Three Y. W. A.'s have attained the Standard of Excellence 
this year — Burlington (First), Hocutt Memorial, and Tem- 
ple, Durham; and two in Class B — Grace Y. W. A.'s, Dur- 
ham, and Olive Chapel. Mrs. Williams also made mention 
of an auxiliary conference held by our Association, June 27, 
1922, at Temple Church, Durham, conducted under the 
leadership of our Superintendent, Mrs. Buck. We think the 
conference was a great success, and helped our work exceed- 
ingly. 

Airs. Buck, Associational Superintendent, next made her 
report, and expressed her appreciation for the hearty co- 
operation of all the women of the different societies, and 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 31 

especially of the pleasant relations to Mrs. W. J. Crain, for- 
merly of Grace Cliurcli, Dnrliam, wlio was assistant superin- 
tendent nntil she left for another field of work. Mrs. Crain 
was succeeded by Mrs. G. E. Isaacs, who has left nothing 
undone to promote the Kingdom work. Mrs. Buck, also 
praised all officers of the Association for their untiring efforts 
to further the cause of Christ in our work. 

The Secretary-Treasurer made her report, after which 
Mrs. Buck appointed the following committees : dominating, 
Time and Place, and Resolutions. 

A letter from Mrs. J. J. Eoddick concerning our Baptist 
Hospital at Winston-Salem was read, and the Association 
voted to furnish a room in this hospital at a minimum cost 
of $200.00. A committee was appointed by the chair to ap- 
portion this amount between the W. M. S., Y. AV. A.'s, 
G. A.'s, and R A.'s. 

A letter was read from Mrs. J. T. AViley, Durham, to our 
Superintendent, giving us the privilege of contributing to 
the home for delinquent children, which is to be l)uilt in Dur- 
ham. Mrs. H. H. Brinson made a motion, which was sec- 
onded by Mrs. Beach, of Hillsboro, that this matter be left 
to the reading of the letter. 

At this time Mrs. W. M. Williams, of Burlington, and 
Miss Jinks, of East Durham, conducted the Y. W. A. and 
G. A. conference. 

The R. A. and Sunbeam conference was conducted by Mrs. 
E. L. Baskin, of Chapel Hill. 

The W. M. S. conference v^as conducted by Mrs. M. W. 
Buck. 

Miss Elizabeth Bri2;£:s and Miss Marv Warren, of Raleioii, 
arrived, and were introduced by Mrs. Buck. Miss Briggs 
spoke on our hospital work, and suggested that gifts to this 
work be over and above our pledges to the 75 Million Cam- 
paign. 

The morning session adjourned, and our Yates friends 
served a bountiful dinner, which was enjoyed by all. 



32 Fifty-third Ank'ual Sessioit 

Afteexooat Session 

The afternoon session was opened by Mrs. Buck, and Mrs. 
W. M. Williams, of Burlington, conducted the devotional 
exercises. 

Miss Elizabeth Bribes ijave an address on how to deal 
with the child and how to train leaders. 

Miss Marv Warren led in prayer for our co-worker, Miss 
Elsie Hunter, who has been ill for some time. Miss Warren 
then made a talk to the young people and W. M. S., using as 
her subject ''A Call to Service," concluding with that beauti- 
ful poem, "The Master Has Come and Calleth for Thee." 

Minutes of the morning session were read and approved. 
A collection was taken, and a count of delegates present — 
W. M. S., 128; Y. W. A.'s, 34; G. xV.'s, 13; Sunbeams, 7; 
visitors, IS. Total, 200 present; 1:4: societies represented. 

The Association felt highly honored to have nine of our 
W. M. U. Training School girls present, and each one made 
an interesting talk on her experiences while attending this 
school. 

It was moved and seconded that we establish a ]\[ount Zion 
W. M. U. scholarship to our Training School. 

Miss Cora Lee Cannon read a letter describing a ^'Chinese 
Wedding'' in China, which all thoroughly enjoyed. 

Mrs. H. F. Brinson made a short talk in behalf of the 
W. M. U. Council of Durham, on the subject of planning to 
entertain our ^V. M. E". State Convention, which will meet 
in Durham in March, 1923. 

Reports of committees are as follows : 

REPORT OF NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

We, your Nominating Committee, feeling tliat our officers of the 
past year liave directed the work of the Woman's Missionary Union 
of tlie Mount Zion Association in a very efficient way, beg to present 
for your approval the full list of officers as now standing for the 
next year. In addition to these officers, we also wish to recommend, 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 33 

if Dr. Maddry offers the services of a Training Scliool girl as asso- 
ciational worker during next summer, tliat we accept lier in our 
Association. 

Miss Velma Goode, 

Chairman. 
Mrs. H. F. Brinson, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Gates, 
Mrs. M. L. Wiggins, 
Mrs. Nannie Gheek. 

REPORT OF GOMMITTEE ON TIME AND PLAGE 

We, tlie committee on Time and Place, recommend that we meet 
Tuesday after the second Sunday in September, 1923. Place to be 
selected later. 

Miss Annie Bell Durham, 
Miss Sallie Small, 
Mrs. J. B. Albright. 

REPORT OF GOMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS 

We, the Gommittee on Resolutions, representing the women of the 
Mount Zion Association, wish to present the following resolutions : 

First. We wish to thank the ladies of Yates Ghurch for the love 
which prompted them to invite us to meet with them. It has been 
a real pleasure to meet together in a social and religious way. Every 
one of us have enjoyed your gracious hospitality and the bountiful 
dinner prepared for us. 

Second. We wish to thank our most efficient officers and Executive 
Gommittee for the splendid work of the past year, and for the help- 
ful program as planned and carried out today. 

Third. We wish to thank every one who had any part on the pro- 
gram. We make especial mention of Miss Briggs and Miss Warren. 
Their coming to us has broughtt inspiration and help, and will mean 
much to us in our work. 

Fourth. May we all resolve to emphasize the payment of our cam- 
paign pledges ; that we earnestly, prayerfully and patiently encourage 
our young people in the Y. W. A., G. A., R. A., and Sunbeam work. 
We further resolve to endeavor to extend more widely the circulation 
of all Baptist religious literature. 

Finally, as individuals and as an Association, we resolve to co- 
operate with our state officers, and we also pledge our support and 
earnest prayers to the Mount Zion Association. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. J. G. Markham, 
Mrs. G. D. Green, 
Mrs. V. G. Garrard. 



TABLE No. 1— CHURCH DIRECTORS 



Chirches 



Church Directory 



Pastors and Postoffices 



Clerks pnd Postoffices 



Antioch 

Bells 

Berea 

Berry's Grove 

Bethel 

Bethesda 

Burlington, First 

Burlington, Hocutt Memorial 

Burlington, Glenco 

Cane Creek 

Carrboro 

Chapel Hill 

Cedar Fork 

Cross Roads 

Durham, East 

Durham, Edgemont 

Durham, First 

Durham, Lakewood 

Durham, Grace 

Durham, Temple 

Durham, West 

Ebenezer 

Efiand '-. 

Eph 



Graham 

Gorman 

Haw River 

Hillsboro, First 

Hillsboro, West Hill_ 

Lowe's Grove 

Lvstra 

Mars Hill 

Mebane 

Mervy Oaks 

Mcfirs Chapel 

Mount Ada 

Mount C.'irmel 

Mount Giiead 

Mount Hermon 

Mount Moriah 

Mount Pisgah 

Olive Branch 

Olive Chapel 

Pleasant Hill 

Red Moimtain 

Robeson Grove 

Rose of Sharon 

Sandy Level 

Swepsonville 

Yates 



C. E. Byrd, Saxapahaw, R. 1. 
H. G. Dossett, Chapel Hill___ 
J. A. Brindell, Creedmoor 

D. D. Lewis, Wake Forest 

J. F. McDuffie, Chapel Hill__ 

L. E. M. Freeman, Raleigh 

M. W. Buck, Burlington! 

E. C. Dean, Burlington 

R. S. Lennon, Burlington 

C. E. Byrd, Saxapahaw 

J. B. Davis, Carrboro 

E. L. Baskins, Chapel Hill___ 

L. E. M. Freeman, Raleigh 

R. S. Lennon, Burlington 

H. F. Brinson, East Durham. 

C. S. Norville, Durham _ 

J. Elwood Welsh, Durham 

C. T. Plybon, Durham 

Geo. T. Watkins, Durham 

T. D. Collins, Durham 

T. M. Green, West Durham 

J. F. Roach, Wake Forest 

W. R. Beach, Hillsboro 

J. B. Davis, Carrboro 

R. P. Ellington, Graham 



J. C. Lloyd, Chapel Hill, R. 3. 
R. G. Beckwith, Apex, R. 3__ 
P. E. Upchurch, Durham 



E. G. Llovd, Chapel Hill 

W. M. Ferrell, Morrisville, R. 2- 

S. C. Stanley, Burlington 

G. D. Smith, Burlington 

C. F. Phillips, Burlington 

Manlv Snipes, Hillsboro, R. 3__ 

C. W. Ray, Carrboro 

W. O. Sparrow, Chapel Hill 

H. M. O'Neal, Morrisville, R. 2_ 
Mrs. Nora Ray, Hillsboro, R. 3- 

J. F. Adams, East Durham 

W. H. Beck, Durham 

E. Clyde Johnson, Durham 

L. T.Latta, Durham 

W. D. Holleman, Durham 

T. O. f-:orrell, Durham 

C. T. Poe, A\'est Durham 

.J. L. Martin, West Durham, R.l 

Rol.ert Riley, I'lliand 

C. R. Pope. Cnapel Hill, R. 4__. 
E. P. Wei) iter, Graham 



A. K. Parrish 

W. R. Beach, Hillsboro- __ 
H. G. Dossett, Chapel Hill. 

G. T. Mills, Apex, R. 1 

J. B. Davis, Carrboro 

W. R. Beach, Hillsboro 

J. C. Canipe, Mebane 



C. E. 
H. T. 
J. B. 
H. G. 
W. R 
T. M. 
C. H. 
Paul 
W. S. 
G. 0. 
J. H. 
Paul 
T. M. 
T. R. 
B. F. 
J. A. 



Byrd, Saxapahaw 

Wright, Wake Forest- 
Davis, Carrboro 

Dossett, Carrboro 

. Beach, Hillsboro 

Green, West Durham. 
Norris, HoUy Springs. 
Hartsell, Creedmoor- - 

Olive, Apex 

Phillips, Bear Creek — 

Boss, Roxboro 

Hartsell. Creedmoor — 
Green, West Durham- 
Cautrell, Wake Forest- 

Delock, Gibsonville 

Brindell, Creedmoor- - 



L. E. Cole, Haw River 

.1. J. Ward, Rillsboro 

H. G. Chisenhall, Hillsboro 

W. E. Lowe, Durham, R. 3 

A. J. Riggsbee, Chapel Hill, R. 4 
W. E. Oakley, Hillsboro, R. 1_- 

J. M. Rimmer, Mebane 

R. J. Yates, Merry Oaks 

J. C. Moore, Saxapahaw 

Ira Rogers, Mebane 

PaulJohnson, ChapelHill 

R. V. Morris, Bynum 

J. E. Harris, Durham, R. 5 

W. E. Carroll, Durham, R. 1_-- 
J. F. Council, Morrisville, R. 1- 
K. E. StaUings, Durham, R. 6_- 

A. H. Ragan, New Hill 

O. A. Holloman, Pittsboro 

N. C. Rhew, Rougemont 

V. L. Husketh, Durham 

J. L. Scott, Durham, R. 2 

Vera Watson, Durham, R. 8 

J. A. FreshAvater, Swepsonville- 
R. J. Pickett, Durham 



Totals. 



MEMBERSHIP, AND PROPERTY 



Chuech Membership 



Gains 



Losses 









»3 C3 

.2PQ 



Church Houses and Parsonages 



2^ 



>W 



M O 



>flH 



62 
22 

1 

4 
16 
32 

4 

2 
23 
67 
23 
28 
25 
51 
34 

2i 

2 

2 



1 


3 




1 


1 


1 


3 


2 


1 


2 


2 







1 




3 


14 


1 


10 


3 


1 


3 


1 


13 


1 


"~3 


2 


7 


5 


n 


1 





29 



-±\ 



5 
6 

5J 
1 
19 
1 
2 



3 ___ 

2 1 

III ~~i 

7 2 
<-> 

III ~"2 

3 — 



50 382|122| 88 



197 
205 
177 
189 
177 
159 
529 
210 

72 
216 
364 
250 
162 

50 
911 
726 
914 
177 

320| iiu 

10221 yes 

593| 2 

73 I no 



1897 



3 

811898 



70 


1889 


49 


1915 


3 


1914 


12 


1887 


15 


1902 


30 


1854 


"~3 


1910 


53 


1889 


100 


1914 


100 


1878 


25 


1914 


20 


1920 


75 


1905 


40 


1897 



woo a 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
brick 
Avood 
wood 
wood 
brick 
brick 
wood 
brick 
brick 
wood 



300 
500 
400 
400 
500 

"ioo 

400 
350 
500 
400 
250 
300 
300 
450 
800 

1000 
250 
650 

1000 
700 



38 

79 

181 

99 

72 

173 

112 

143 

215 

108 

181 

38 

38 

77 

127 

200 



no 

yes 

yes 

yes 

yes 

yes 

yes 

yes 

yes 

yes 

yes 

yes 

no 

yes 

yes I 

yes I 



154| yesi 
2201 yes| 
199 1 no 



154 


yes 


464 


no 


68 


yes 


207 


ves 


78 


yes 


124 


ves 


64 


yes 


159 


yes 


106 


yes 



115711. 



-I 



25 



1916 



1915 
1894 
1860 
1920 
1911 
1900 
1903 
1907 
1890 
1878 
1890 



10 

3| 

.-_I1902 
15 1881 
1011876 
.— 11890 



wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
brick 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 



400 
300 
750 
400 
500 
300 
400 
300 
1000 
350 
500 
500 
250 
250 

"600 



1881 
1908 
1879 



1883 
1875 



wood 
wood 
wood 
wood I 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 



600 
600 
350 
800 
300 
300 
500 
400 
350 
500 
300 



; 2000 
3000 
3000 
2500 
2500 
1400 
7500 
8000 
3700 
2500 
2000 
7000 
2800 
1000 
6000 
40000 
70000 
5000 
40000 
46000 
16000 
1500 
2500 
1500 
10000 
2000 
2000 
4500 
5750 
4000 
5000 
2000 
12000 
2500 
300 
1500 
2500 
3000 
1800 
2000 
2000 
2C00 
5000. 
400 
1000 
1500 
2500 
1000 
3500 
5000 



361150 



5000 



3000 
12000 



1150 



200 
1600 



2000 



24950 



9400 
4300 
1500 



2000 
2500 



6500 



2000 2000 
21000 10000 
50000112000 

45001 6000 
25000 
23000 

7500 



1500 
1500 
3000 



3000 
2500 



5000 



1500 



2500 
1500 



175200 



9000 
4000 



3000 



1500 



400 
8000 



5000 



72400 



485550 



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Haw River 

Hillsboro, First 

Hillsboro, West Hill 

Lowe's Grove 

Lvstra 

Mars Hill 

Mebane 

Meny Oaks 

Moores Chapel 

Mount Ada 

Muant Carmel 

Mount Giiead 

Mount Hermon 

Mount Moriah 

Mount Pisgah 

Olive Branch 

Olive Chapel 

Pleasant Hill 

Red Mountain 

Robeson Grove 

Rose of Sharon 

Sandy Level 

Swepsonville 

Yates 


1 



TABLE No. 



ChURCHE! 



Superintendents and 
postoefices 



Secretaries and 
postoffices 



Antioch 

Bells 

Berrv's Grove 

Bethel 

Eelliesda 

Burlington, First 

Burlington, Hocutt Memorial. 

Burlington, Glenco 

Cane Creek 

Carrboro 

Chapel Hill 

Cedar Fork 

Cross Roads 

Durham, East 

Durham, Edgemont 

Durham, First 

Durham, LakeAvood 

Durham, Grace 

Durham, Temple 

Durham, West 

Ebenezer 

Efland 

Ephesus 

Grg,ham 

Gorman 

HaAV River 

Hillsboro, First 

Hillsboro, West Hill 

Lowe's Grove 

Lvstra 

Mars Hill 

Mebane 

Merry Oaks 

Moors Chapel 

Mount Gilead 

Mount Hermon 

Mount Moriah 

Mount Pisgah 

Olive Branch 

Olive Chapel 

Pleasant Hill 

Red Mountain 

Robeson Grove 

Rose of Sharon 

Sandy Level 

Swepsonville 

Yates 



Totals- 



C. W. Grey. Chapel Hill, R. 3-- 
Haivey Mills, Apex, R. 4 



Miss Jeanett Whitfield, Chapel Hill, R,, 
R. H. Holloman, Apex, R. 3 



Luioo Llovd, Chapel Hill 

W. M. Ferrell, Morrisville, R. 2__. 

J. L. Scott, Burlington 

A^'aUei M. Williams. Burlington__ 

•lohn R. Allen. Burlington 

H. H. King, Hillsboro, R. 3 

E. P. Ellington. Carrboro 

S. AV. Bynum, Chapel Hill 

A. M. Sorrell, Morrisville 

E. F. McCaulay. Hillsboro, R. 3-_ 

W. E. Stanley, East Durham 

W. H, Bright, Durham 

B. W. Rogers, Durham 

F. A. Ward, Durham 

.J. M. Cheek, Durham 

E. S. Booth, Durham 

J. L. Hester, West Durham 

W. J.Williams,West Durham, R.l 

C. N. Parker, Efland 

G. M. Pope, Durham, R. 1 

A. P. Williams, Graham 

L M. Duncan, Durham, R. 8 

L. E. Cole, Haw River 

T. E. Sparrow, Hillsboro 

A. M. Keck, Hillsboro 

.1. L. Green Durham, R. 8 

W. B. Cheek, Chapel Hill, R. 1— 

C. M. Walker, Hillsboro 

J. A. Williams, Mebane 

R. J. Yates, Merry Oaks 

J. M. Clark, Saxapahaw 

J. B. Ward, Hackney 

E. F. Harris, Durham, R. 5 

W. PI. Hester, Durham, R. 1 

T. H. Wilson, Morrisville, R. 1 

N. L. Ferrell, Durham, R. 6 

J. B. Mills, Apex 

W. A. Copeland, Pittsboro_^ 

W. P. Mangxim, Rougemont 



O. A. Lloyd, Chapel Hill 

Ernest Edgerton, Durham, R. 6 

Miss Verna L. Cates, Burlington 

D. S. Foster, Burlington 

G. S. Murrav. Burlina;ton 

Miss Cora King, Hillsboro, R. 3 

C. W. Ray, Carrboro 

P. L. Wimbcrly, Chapel Hill 

T^^'iul Walton, Morrisville 

Winder McCaulay, Hillsboro, R. 3 — 

W. J. Williams, East Durham 

M. J. Bright, Durham 

M. J. Paschall, Durham 

Miss Beautis Bassett. Durham 

W. L. Farthing, Durham 

T. O. Sorrell, Durham 

D. B. Oakley, Durham. 

Miss Annie Martin, West Durham, R. 

J. D. Stephens, Efland 

Vernon P. Pope, Durham, R. 1 

Jas Nicholson, Graham 

Miss Annie Fogleijian, Durham, R. 8_ 

W. E. McCraken. Haw River 

W. H. Walker, Hillsboro 

Claude Moore, Hillsboro 

Charles Maddry. Durham, R. 7 

Ray Williams, Chapel Hill, R. 1 

W. O. Mincy, Hillsboro, R. 1 

W .0. WeatheWy, Mebane 

A. G. Hendrick 



•J. L. Scott, Durham, R. 2 

R. L. Hicks, Durham 

W. M. Phillips, Swepsonville. 
R. S. McGhee, Durham 



Lennie Neal, Pittsboro, R. 1 

Edgar Couch, Durham, R. 5 

C. H. Carroll, Durham, R. 1 

Frank Mulholland, Apex, R. 4 

Miss Lurline Nichols, Durham, R. 

J. H. Luther, Apex 

O. A. Holloman, Pittsboro 

Eugene Mangum, Rougemont 



John L. Scott, Durham, R. 2. 
Emma Glenn, Dtirham, R. 6_ 
Cloud Phillips, Swtpsonville- 
Ernest Garrard, Durham 



■ NDAY SCHOOLS 
























Statistical Summaey 


Total Enrolled 


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2| 

1 


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1 5 


1 1 


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i 62 
102 
) 406 
7 367 
3 130 
B 124 
3 286 
) 186 

5 98 
B 46 
J. 800 
i 586 

598 

) 226 

^ 249 

717 

> 590 

51 

31 

77 

200 

97 

168 

104 

177 

165 

158 

55| 

179 

24 

~"~91 

75 


35 

35 

67 

280 

240 

73 

70 

216 

125 

80 

40 

509 

391 

365 

150 

178 

450 

290 





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1 





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15 00 


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31 60 






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122 491 

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338 651 96 28 

1 183 74] 566 47 

1 37 02 


408 77 




1 








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34 
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122 49 












135 00 


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42 
62 


372 
243 
230 
110 
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301 
211 


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129 




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1910~51 

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19 82 
390 54 


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193 II2I 

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27 60 










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116 281 


31 00 










116 28 


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23 00 
171 09 


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MINUTES . 

' • OF THE 

FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

»0unt Zxtxn m^pti^t 




HELD WITH 

MOUNT MORIAH BAPTIST CHURCH 

ORANGE COUNTY, N. C. "•• 

OCTOBER 16-17, 1923 



The next session will be held with Mt. Gilead Baptist Church, ten 

miles south of Chapel Hill, Tuesday and Wednesday 

after the second Sunday in October, 1924 



i^trs\ihf$\i(/s\itjrsvt(/svit^r7S^h«vir)«Yih«vir^ 



^ 



■^ 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

^03S0ciati0n 




HELD WITH 

MOUNT MORIAH BAPTIST CHURCH 

ORANGE COUNTY, N. C. 
OCTOBER 16-17, 1923 



The next session will be held with Mt. Gilead Baptist Church, ten 

miles south of Chapel Hill, Tuesday and Wednesday 

after the second Sunday in October, 1924 



OFFICERS 



W. M. WILLIAMS, Moderator Apex 

T. M. GREEN, Vice-Moderator Durham 

W. O. WILLIAMS, Clerk . Durham 

J. N. CHEEK, Treasurer Durham 

W. S. ANDREWS, Auditor Chapel Hill 

J. F. MacDUFFIE, Historian Chapel Hill 



ORDAINED MINISTERS HOLDING CHURCH MEMBERSHIP 
IN ASSOCIATION 



Baskin, E. L. Chapel Hill 

Beach, W. R. Hillsboro 

Blackwood, Hoyt Wake Forest 

Brindell, J. A. Durham 

Brinson, H. F. East Durham 

Buck, Martin W Burlington 

Canipe, J. C. Mebane 

Collins, Trela D ..„. Durham 

Cox, R. E West Durham 

Davis, J. B. Carrboro 

Dorsett, H. Grady _ Carrboro 
Dunnegan, W. E. .__ Durham, R. 6 

Dean, E. C. Burlington 

Ellington, R. P. .__ Graham 

Green, Thomas M . __West Durham 



Harward, G. N. ._ Morrisville, R. 1 

Kinnett, A, D. Louisville 

Lennon, R. S. Burlington 

MacDuffie, J. F Chapel Hill 

Muckle, Coy Wake Forest 

Nichols, H. S. Louisville 

Olive, W. S. Apex, R. 3 

Overby, L. W. West Durham 

Plybon, C. T, Durham 

Rankin, M. W China 

Ross, Clarence Cincinnati, Ohio 

Stanistreet, E. A. Durham 

Watkins, George T Durham 

Weeks, H. L. Durham 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
C. P. Norris, S. J. Porter, H, F. Brinson, to serve 3 years each; 
Martin W. Buck, W. E. Young, L. G. Cole, to serve 1 year each; T. 
M. Green, J. C. Markham, Walter M. Williams, to serve 2 years each. 

COMMITTEE ON ORDER OF BUSINESS 
G. T. Watkins, W. M. Buck, J. F. McDuffie 

MESSENGERS 
To Southern Baptist Convention — T. M. Green 

To Baptist State Convention -F. A. Ward, W. M. Williams, J. C. 
Canipe. 



Subject 
Associational Missions 

Foreign Missions 

State Missions 

Home Missions 

Orphanage 

Biblical Recorder 

Ministerial Relief 

Christian Education 

Sunday Schools 

Woman's Work 

Temperance 

B. Y. P. U. 



Reported Discussed 

Ch'm. of Ex. Com T. M. Green 

C. S. Norville H. L. Weeks 

A. H. King M. W. Buck 

B. W. Rogers S. J. Porter 

S. W. Andrews E. C. Dean 

W. E. Stanley W. R. Beach 

J. T. Salmon G. T. Watkins 

F. A. Ward J. C. Canipe 

J. C. Markham T. D. Collins 

Mrs. G. E. Isaacs Mrs. M. W. Buck 

G. T. Mills R. T. Ship 

L. E. M. Freeman E. A. Stanistreet 



CONSTITUTION 



Article 1. This Association shall be called Mount Zion Baptist 
Association. 

Art. 2. The Association shall meet annually on Tuesday after 
the second Sunday in October, and be composed of the ordained minis- 
ters belonging to, and members chosen annually by the several 
churches belonging to this body, who by presenting letters from their 
respective churches certify their appointment, shall be entitled to 
seats. 

Art. 3. The number of delegates from each church shall be three, 
and one additional delegate from each Sabbath School connected 
with that church, who shall be a member of some Baptist Church. 

Art. 4. The letters from the churches shall state the number bap- 
tized, received by letter, restored, dismissed by letter, excluded and died 
during the past year, the total number in fellowship, and the amount 
paid as pastor's salary, incidental expenses, minute fund, for the poor. 
State, Foreign, Home Missions, Educational, Baptist Orphanage, Sab- 
bath School, Old Ministers' Relief, Associational Missions and such other 
information as may be deemed necessary for publication. 

Art. 5. The members thus convened shall sit as an advisory council, 
who shall have no power to infringe on any of the internal rights of the 
churches. 

Art. 6. In all their discussions and acts, this Association shall rec- 
ognize Christ as the only law-giver in Zion, and that every individual 
church is an independent body. 

Art. 7. It shall be the duty of this Association v/hen requested by 
aggrieved members to hear their grievances, give appropriate advice, or 
send committees to aid them in their diificulties. If the minority of the 
church is aggrieved with the majority, upon application they shall be 
entitled to the same consideration. Individual applications will not be 
entertained. 

Art. 8. The Association shall have power to withdraw from any 
church that shall knov/ingly or wilfully depart from the orthodox prin- 
ciples of the religion as taught in the Bible and held by the regular 
Baptists as the true teachings thereof. 

Art. 9. The officers of this Association shall be: A Moderator, a 
Vice-Moderator, a Clerk, a Treasurer, a Historian, and an Auditor. 

Art. 10. All of the officers of this Association shall be elected an- 
nually by ballot. 

Art. 11. The Clerk shall keep a faithful record of its proceedings 
and have the minutes published and distributed to the churches accord- 
ing to the amount paid by each for such object. He shall be pa'id 
fifty ($50.00) dollars out of the minute fund for his work. 

Art. 12. The Historian shall collect and put in some durable form 
all facts of interest about each of the churches and report at each ses- 
sion of this body. 

Art. 13. The Treasurer shall receive and pay over to the proper 
parties all the money contributed by the churches and make an annual 
report to the Association. 



FiFTY-P'OURTH AnNUAL SeSSION 



Art. 14. The Auditor shall annually examine the Treasurer's books 
and see that they are kept in an intelligent, business-like way, and at- 
test the report. 

Art. 15. This Association shall be an Auxiliary to the Baptist State 
Convention in all Educational, Mission, Sabbath School and other work. 

Art. 16. Baptist Churches on application for admission to this body 
shall be received and their delegates seated, if necessary evidence is 
given that they are truly of our faith and order. 

Art. 17. Amendments to this Constitution maj^ be made at any an- 
nual meeting, two-thirds of the members concurring. 



ENROLLMENT 



Messengers from the churches enrolled as follows: 
Antioch— P. C. Lloyd, R. L. Smith. 
Bells — None enrolled. 
Berea — Fred Herndon. 

Berry's Grove— D. W. Dickery, A. E. Wilson. 
Bethel— C. Whit Lloyd, R. O. Gates, Bennie Gates, Nevie Dollar. 
Bethesda — W. J. Martin, Vernon Maynard, L. G. Strickland, J. C. 

Colclough, W. M. FerrelL 
Burlington, First — Mrs. R. H. Andrews, Mrs. L. S. Moody, J. H. Ver- 
non, Mrs. M. W. Buck, G. H. Gates. 
Burlington, Hocutt Memorial — J. M. Engle, Mrs. Mamie Durham, G. D. 

Gattis, Andrew S. Burges, J. M. Robinette, Mrs. W. M. William, 

Mrs. A. S. Burgess, Rosa L. Patterson. 
Burlington, Glencoe — Mrs. R. S. Lennon, D. F. Phillips, Thomas Mc- 

Kinney, Fred Atkinson. 
Cane Greek — A. G. Grawford, Julius Andrews, H. H. King, Thelma 

Reynold. 
Carrboro — Mrs, A. P. Johnson, W. G. Womble, Norman Phillips, Mrs. 

B. F. Ray, A. L. Andrews, G. B. Andrews. 
Gedar Fork— N. R. Shipp. 
Chapel Hill— J. M. Cheek, S. W. Bynum, S. W. Andrews, R. A. 

Eubanks. 
Cross Roads — Mrs. J. W. Carr, J. W. Carr, Mrs. John Ray. 
Durham, East— E. W. Fonville, W. E. Young, W. E. Stanley, Mrs. H. 

F. Brinson, Mrs. R. S. Ellis, Miss Ruth Jinks. 
Durham, Edgemont — John H. Irwine, F. E. Steed, Valeria Morris, A. 

W. Cain, L. V. Byrd. 
Durham, First— B. W. Rogers L. G. Cole, R. E. Hurst M, L. Byrd, 

John Sweaney. 
Durham, Grace — J. P. Woody, J. G. Roberts, K. U. Bryan. 
Durham, Lakewood— F. A. Ward, W. M. Findly, Mrs. F. A. Ward. 
Durham, Temple— J. C. Markham, E, J. Whitaker, A. M. Kirkland, C. 

M. Grutchfield. 
Durham, Watts Street— J. T. Salmon, W. H. Young. 
Durham, West— W. T. Byrd, W. P. Phillips, Jr., C. M. Hight. 
Efland— J. D. Stevens, T. W. Riley. 

Ebenezer — A. O. Gates, Mrs. Mary J. John, J. M. Martin. 
Ephesus — G. M. Pope, Anna A. Pope, G. D. King. 
Gorman — None enrolled. 

Graham— Mrs. J. D. Albright, J. D. Albright, A. P. Williams. 
Hillsboro— J. M. Carr, P. H. Smith, G. H. Burt, H. H. Thompson. 



6 Fifty-fourth Annual Session 

Hillsboro, West Hill— H. D. Smith. 

Haw River^ — A. K. Parrish. 

Lowe's Grove — T. L. Pendergrass, J. L. Green. 

Lystra— W. B. Cheek, Mrs. J. C. Blake, Mrs. James Oldham, W. H. 

Williams. 
Mars Hill— C. M. Walker, H. J. Walker, A. A. Compton. 
Mebane — J. M. Rimmer, Henry H. Brown, L. E. Ogburn, U. S. Ray. 
Merry Oaks— R. J. Yates, J. B. Little. 
Moore's Chapel — H. L. Young. 
McDuffie Memorial — J. O. Franklin. 
Mount Ada — Miss Mary Westbrooks, Mrs. W. N. McDade, W. N. 

Whitted. 
Mount Carmel — Mrs. J. H. Jones, Mrs. C. L. Rich, Mrs. N. R. Black- 
wood. 
Mount Gilead — Mrs. J. J. Hackney, Jr., Lillie Johnson, Z. J. Johnson, 

T. W. Herndon, J. J. Hackney, Jr. 
Mount Hermon — Mrs. E. F. Harris, E. F. Harri^. 
Mount Moriah — Mrs. W. T. Atkins, J. A. Pendergraph. 
Mount Pisgah— G. T. Yates, H. J. Womble, H. B. Barbee. 
Olive Branch — K. E. Stallings. 
Olive Chapel— J. B. Mills, J. H. Luther. 
Pleasant Hill — None enrolled. 
Red Mountain— W. P. Mangum, E. T. Mangum, P. B. Bowling, H. H. 

Cates. 
Rose of Sharon— W. P. Newton, J. L. Scott, Jr., J. W. James, G. R. 

Newton. 
Robinson Grove — None enrolled. 
Sandy Level — C. E. Lynn, Mrs. M. M. Ferrell, Mrs. Laura Summerland, 

Fenton Summerland, Mrs. J. H. Ladd, J. H. Ladd, E. H. Cates, 

C. C. Lynn. 
Swepsonville— W. M. Phillips, J. L. Steele. 
Yates— C. R. Harris, Paul Pickett, R. J. Pickett. 

The following pastors in the Association enrolled: 
E. L. Raskins, W. R. Beach, H. F. Brinson, Martin W. Buck, C. E. 
Byrd, J. C. Canipe, Trela D. Collins, J. B. Davis, E. C. Dean, H. G. 
Dorsett, B. G. Early, R. P. Ellington, L. E. M. Freeman, R. R. Gordon, 
T. M. Green, R. S. Lennon, J. F. MacDuffie, G. T. Mills, C. S. Norville, 
C. T. Plybon, J. F. Roach, Geo. T. Watkins, H. L. Weeks, J. A. Brindell. 



PART I 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE MT. ZION 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Durham, N. C, R. No. 1, Oct. 16th, 1923, 

MORNING SESSION 

The Mount Zion Baptist Association met with Mount Moriah 
Baptist Church in its fifty-fourth annual session promptly at 
10:00 A. M, 

Moderator W. S. Olive being absent Vice-Moderator Walter 
M. Williams called the Association to order. 

At the request of the moderator E. A. Stanistreet is to head 
the music of this session of the Association. "We're Marching to 
Zion/' was sung. J. F. McDuffie conducted the devotional exer- 
cises, leading in prayer and reading 1st Corinthians, 13 chapter. 
Chas. E. Maddry led in prayer. 

B. W. Rogers, W. E. Stanley, C. M. Walker were appointed 
as tellers to enroll the messengers and 111 were reported as en- 
rolled. 

Report of the Committee on Order of Business was adopted. 

L. G. Cole nominated T. M. Green for moderator and M. W. 
Buck nominated Walter M. Williams. After a ballot Bro. Wil- 
liams was declared elected moderator. 

On motion M. W. Buck cast the ballot of the Association for 
T. M, Green as vice-moderator. 

On Motion L. G. Cole cast the ballot of the Association for 
W. O. Williams as clerk. 

On motion H. F. Brinson cast the ballot of the Association 
for J. N. Cheek as treasurer. 

On motion W. R. Beach cast the ballot of the Association for 
S. W. Andrews as auditor. 

On motion G. T. Watkins cast the ballot of the Association 
for J, F. McDuffie as historian. 



8 Fifty-fourth Annual Session 

Temperance was reported by L. G. Cole and discussed by L. 
G. Cole and Chas. E. Maddry and adopted. 

Report on Sunday Schools was made by Walter M. Williams 
and discussed by H. F. Brinson and adopted. 

After singing "Amazing Grace" Dr. J. E. Welsh, of Ports- 
mouth, Va., read Malachi 2:1-13 and C. T. Plybon preached the 
annual sermon, using as his theme "God's Man," based on Mala- 
chi 2 :6. 

The moderator announced the committee on Finance — W. E. 
Young, P. B. Bowling, W. E. Stanley. 

Bro. T. M. Green then spoke words of welcome and stated 
that this was the centennial year of this church. 

Adjourned one hour for dinner, which was graciously served 
on the grounds. 

TUESDAY— AFTERNOON SESSION 

After a song service, Howard L. Weeks read Matthew 
18:1-21. Prayer by R. T. Vann. 

The moderator announced the following committees : 

To nominate the executive committee — E. L. Baskins, R. L. 
Smith, R. T. Shipp, B. W. Rogers, E. C. Dean. 

To nominate messengers to Southern Baptist Convention — G. 
T. Watkins, P. C. Lloyd, H. G. Dorsett, J. T. Salmon, H. H. 
Thompson. 

To nominate messengers to Baptist State Convention — J. C. 
Canipe, F. A. Ward, T. D. Collins, R. P. Ellington, J. M. 
Rimmer. 

On Place and Preacher— L. G. Cole, T. W. Booker, C. H. 
Cates, Kinney Parrish, S. W. Andrews. 

On Order Business— G, T. Watkins, M. W. Buck, J. F. Mc- 
Duffie. 

New pastors and visitors were recognized as follows : Pastors 
— Howard L. Weeks, R. R. Gordon. Visitors — W. G. Farrow, 
R. E. White, E. Stubblefield, R. T. Vann, Chas. E. Maddry, J. 
Elwood Welsh, C. E. Stevens, Archibald Johnson. 

On request of Red Mountain Baptist Church, a committee of 
five were appointed, composing a Presbytery, to examine Rev. W. 



I 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 9 

P. Mangum^ who recently came to their church from the Metho- 
dist church, H. F. Brinson, C. S. Norville, H. L. Weeks, T. D. 
Collins, T. M. Green, J. B. Davis, W, R. Beach. 

Foreign Missions reported by Geo. T. Watkins and Home 
Missions reported by M. W. Buck was discussed by Chas. E. 
Maddry and report adopted. 

The report on the Baptist Orphanage was written by C. L. 
Haywood and read by the clerk; discussed by Archibald John- 
son, B. W. Rogers, R. S. Lennon and adopted. 

Motion by R. S. Lennon, that the Mount Zion Association 
ask its moderator to request the Board of Trustees of our Or- 
phanage to put on a campaign to enlarge the orphanage to take 
care of our needy orphan children was adopted. 

Announcements and adjournment till 10 a. m. Wednesday 
morning. 

WEDNESDAY— MORNING SESSION 

Thirty minutes were devoted to prayer service before the As- 
sociation met. 

10:00 o'clock a. m. the Association was called to order. After 
singing "Stand Up for Jesus," C. E. Byrd conducted the devo- 
tional service, calling on M. W. Buck for prayer and reading and 
commenting on John 4:27-38. 

At this time Bro. C. Whitt Lloyd, 85 years of age and a char- 
ter member of the Association, was recognized. The Association 
also recognized Bro. William Cole as a charter member. 

The program for the day was adopted. 

Woman's Work reported by Mrs. M. W, Buck and discussed 
by L. E. M. Freeman was adopted. 

Biblical Recorder reported by S. W. Andrews and discussed 
by W. R. Beach was adopted. 

Associational Missions was reported by J. C. Canipe, dis- 
cussed by J. C. Canipe, W. R. Beach, J. F. McDuffie, L. G. Cole, 
Geo. T. Watkins, M. W. Buck and adopted. 

J. B. Davis read the report on B. Y. P. U., discussed by C. E. 
Byrd and adopted. 

A petition for the admittance of Watts Street Baptist Church 



10 Fifty-fourth Axxual Session 

-to the Mount Zion Association was made by its pastor. H. L. 
Weeks, and the Moderator referred the petition to the following 
committee for recommendation — M. W. Buck. T. D. Collins. J. 
P. McDuffie. 

Just here Bro. M. W. Buck was given ten minutes and some 
appropriate suggestions were made to the Association. 

As a benelit to the program committee H. F. Brinson made a 

motion: 

The program committee be instructed to correspond with the rep- 
resentatives of the various boards and objects fostered by our State 
Convention, to learn the time most convenient for them to appear on the 
program and arrange it accordingly and that the Association then ad- 
here to the program as prepared and adopted. 

Motion carried. 

The report on Ministerial Relief, prepared by C. T. Plybon. 
was read by J. C, Canipe, discussed by H. L. Weeks. Report 
adopted. 

State Mission reported by C. S. Xorville. discussed by A. C. 
Hanby. Report adopted. 
Adjourned one hour for dinner. 

WEDNESDAY— AFTERNOON SESSION 

After singing "Jesus Keep Me Near the Cross." F. A. Ward 
read Malaclii 3d chapter. Prayer by Geo. T. Witkins. 

Reuben Shipp made some appropriate remarks on the 75 
Million Campaign. 

J. F. Roach and B. G. Early were recognized as new pastors 
in the Association. 

Once-a-month preaching was discussed by Walter S. Craw- 
ford and all churches were urged to. as soon as possible^ go to 
full time. 

The committee appointed to consider the petition for the ad- 
mittance of Watts Street Church reported. The petitioning ap- 
plication for admittance into the Mount Zion Association has been 
considered by your appointed committee and recommend their 
admittance into our Association as a church. The report was 
adopted. 

Respectfully submitted. 

COMMITTEE. 



MouxT Ziox Baptist Association 11 

The Treasurer made his report. 

On recommendation of the committees the following messen- 
gers were elected: 

Southern Baptist Convention — T. M. Green. 

State Baptist Convention — F. A. Ward. W. M. Williams. J. 
C. Canipe. 

L. G. Cole reported for the committee on Place and Preacher. 

Place — Mount Gilead Church. Chatham County, ten miles 
south of Chapel Hill. 

Preacher — Geo. T. Watkins. alternate. C. E. Byrd. 

The committee on finance reported, through the chairman. W. 
E, Young, and the report was adopted. 

The following resolution of thanks, offered by Geo. T. Wat- 
kins, was adopted: 

The Association expresses its thanks to the pastor, members and 
neighbors of this church for their gracious hospitality and to the ladies 
for providing such good meals. 

On report of the nominating committee C. P. Xorris, S. J. 
Porter, H. F. Brinson were named to serve on the executive com- 
mittee for three years. 

C. E. Byrd speaks in regard to Moore's Chapel, a mission 
point, and its great need of help to build a church. The Associa- 
tion went on record commending this church's work to the 
churches of the Association and that each church aid them in 
their building campaign as much as they were able. 

C. P. Xorris was heard on Evangelism and as chairman of the 
executive committee recommended: After going over the qualifi- 
cations of the different men available for the work of Associa- 
tional Missionary we recommend Kev. T. M. Green for the work. 
Brother Green was unanimously selected as Associational Mis- 
sionary. 

The Association then adjourned to meet with Mount Gilead 
church, October 14.th, 1924. 

Evangelist M, F. Ham, of Kentucky, who was conducting an 
evangelist campaign in Durham, was introduced at the close of 
the Association and preached one of his soul stirring sermons 
which was greatly enjoyed by all who heard him. 

W. M. WILLIAMS, Moderator. 

W. O. WILLIAMS, Clerk. 



12 Fifty-fourth Annual Session 



REPORT ON TEMPERANCE 

For years it has been a custom for our various religious gatherings 
to have both written and verbal reports on Temperance; which is one of 
the most important subjects ever discussed in our gatherings, and which 
should claim our closest attention today. The minute Temperance is 
uttered or written the average hearer sees looming up before his eyes 
nothing but liquor, bootlegger, violation of law and order, the drunk- 
ard and he in the ditch. I am thinking of Temperance in a broader 
sense and I can't do better in this report than to give you Webster's 
Unabridged Dictionary's definition for Temperance, which is as follows: 

"Moderation — particularly, habitual moderation in regard to the in- 
dulgence of the natural appetites and passions; restrained or moderate 
indulgence; is, Temperance in eating and drinking; Temperance in the 
indulgence of joy or mirth. Temperance, in eating and drinking is op- 
posed to gluttony and drunkenness, and in other indulgences to excess. 

From the above definition you will gather in each instance that eat- 
ing is mentioned before drinking and that patience, calmness and mod- 
eration of passion are all a part of Temperance. The use of the tongue 
in this day without proper control is doing perhaps more harm to the 
human race than spiritous liquors. In the application and study of Tem- 
perance, in its broadest meaning, will compel us, in this day and gen- 
eration, as never before, to use the "Golden Rule" in all our various 
and sundry relations in life. What a beautiful world this would be, if 
each and every one of us were Temperate in eating, in speaking, in do- 
ing, in seeing and in "Doing unto others as we would have them do 
unto us." 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. G. COLE. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

Baptist Sunday School work in North Carolina has shown marvelous 
growth and development during the past year in numbers of schools, in 
membership, in efficiency of organization, in buildings and equipment, in 
Teacher Training. Under the leadership of Secretary E. L. Middleton 
and his co-workers, these thhigs have been stressed as a means to the 
end that the Word of God may be so taught as to lead people to a per- 
sonal knowledge of Jesus Christ as Saviour from sin, to the acceptance 
and public confession of Him as Saviour and to growth in grace and 
knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ. 



We stand first among the states in the South, in number of Sunday 
schools to the number of churches, having 2,174- Baptist Sunday schools 
in the state. New Sunday schools are being organized every year, but 
the aim is a Sunday school in every Baptist Church in the state. 

MEMBERSHIP 

In membership we rank second, with 265,496 enrolled in Sunday 
schools. For every 100 church members there are nearly 82 people in 
the Sunday schools in North Carolina. But 55 of these are not church 
members and we are facing the humiliating fact that our Sunday school 
enrollment is far behind our church enrollment. There are at least 
600,800 people who belong to our churches and go to no Sunday school. 
If they are not in Sunday school, it is most probable that the Word is 



r 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 13 



not being hid in their hearts. One of our big tasks is to enlist our 
church members in the Bible school. Another big task is to reach and 
train the 250,000 children who belong to Baptist Sunday schools. 

ORGANIZATION 

The Standard of Excellence as erected by the Baptist Sunday School 
Board, Nashville, is being recognized more and more, as a measure of 
efl&ciency, and a well-rounded and worth-while program. We rank sec- 
ond in standard schools, twenty-seven having attained the standard to 
date. In addition, two Sunday schools have reached the Advanced or 
AA-1 standard. There are only four other such schools in the South- 
ern Baptist Convention. 

BUILDINGS AND EaUIPMENT 

Buildings are being improved as never before in order to adequately 
care for improved Sunday schools, with corresponding improvement in 
equipment. Over 100 new or remodeled church houses are being built. 
The Architectural department of the Sunday School Board stands ready 
to furnish expert advice so that money invested in buildings may be 
wisely spent to meet modern needs. 

TEACHER TRAINING 

It is the very heart and life of all Sunday school work. Without 
trained teachers, inferior work is inevitable. With trained teachers, al- 
most any ideal is possible. When churches realize the tremendous re- 
sponsibility of so sacred a task as grafting the living truth of God's Will 
into living souls for time and eternity, they will arouse to the absolute 
necessity of entrusting that task in the hands of trained teachers. 

North Carolina stands well to the front in this work but we must 
press forward. This work is fostered through Training Schools in town 
and city churches, through the summer campaign for country churches, 
and through the correspondence course for those who cannot attend a 
class. 

During the year a splendid book, "Building a Country Sunday 
School," by Secretary E. L. Middleton, has been published and is receiv- 
ing much favorable comment. It recognizes difficulties, presents practi- 
cal plans for solving them and gives vision of what a country church, 
which measures up to its possibilities, mav be. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

The urgency of the Sunday School task calls to each church: 

1. To adopt a definite program of persistent effort to reach the un- 
reached and untaught, and especially to enlist more of the church mem- 
bers for the Sunday schools. 

2. To provide better buildings and equipment to make a place to 
hold and really teach the increased number enlisted. 

3. To plan for a worthwhile program of all-round efficiency as em- 
bodied in the Standard of Excellence. 

4. To adapt a permanent Teacher-Training policy looking toward 
enlisting every teacher and officer in the Normal Course, and training 
prospective officers and teachers for the future. 

The Sunday School Department of our State Mission Board stands 
ready to help any church in putting on these plans. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER M. WILLIAMS. 



14 Fifty-fourth Annual Session 



REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

It is difficult in this brief report to set forth in an adequate way the 
magnitude of our denomination's present educational system in North 
Carolina. It is more difficult to state candidly its importance. 

The Baptist State Convention, the Home Mission Board, and institu- 
tions owned and controlled by Baptist individuals in North Carolina 
number twenty. Our share in four state-wide institutions increase the 
number to twenty-four. Again, I say it is difficult to see the size of the 
educational forces of North Carolina Baptists. Twenty-four schools ! 
The system heads up in Wake Forest and Meredith, though each is a 
link in a mighty chain. 

There were enrolled in our Baptist Schools in this state last year 
4,917 students, of which 207 were ministerial students, and 85 volunteers 
for foreign service. This does not include the south-wide schools. North 
Carolina, for instance, has led in recent years in the number of students 
in the Louisville Seminary. As we think of this great group of more 
than 5,000 students, can we estimate in any worthy manner the impor- 
tance of the training they are receiving? In other words, will the value 
in service rendered the Baptist denomination and the Kingdom of God, 
by this greatly increasing group from year to year, justify an adequate 
support of our schools? The Board of Education makes a threefold sug- 
gestion which will help answer the question: 

First, "that the rapidly increasing demand for special training in 
every worthy human enterprise of whatever nature, suggests at least 
an equal need for such training for service in the Kingdom of our Lord." 

Second, "the policy of compulsory education now being pursued in 
North Carolina means that the next generation of citizens will be com- 
paratively well educated, and the general average of intellectual culture 
will be far above what it is now. And this fact in turn means of course, 
that our children and their children will require educated leaders, not 
only in the pulpit, but also in the Sunday School, and in all our Chris- 
tian enterprises. For, while, of course, the first and most important 
quality in any Christian worker is spirituality and consecration, these 
qualities alone will not enlist nor command the following of the culti- 
vated masses." 

Third, "the most subtle and persistent assault on our faith now is in 
the field of the natural and intellectual sciences as taught in our higher 
institutions of learning. And in these schools these assaults must be 
met and foiled. Only in our Baptist institutions can we have any voice 
as to the character of the teaching given to our young people. And it 
is essential, therefore, that these be maintained at all hazards." 

May the magnitude of our educational system dawn anew on each 
one of us, and a loyalty to these institutions which are ours, express it- 
self in such a manner that their God given destinies be realized. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. C. DEAN. 

REPORT ON BIBLICAL RECORDER 

When the Biblical Recorder was established its chief mission was to 
keep the churches informed as to the work of the denomination. The 
convention had been organized but three years, the churches belonging 
to the Convention were scattered over the state, the means of communi- 
cation were quite limited, and the brethren realized the need of having 
some means of communication between the churches. The most effec- 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 15 



tive agency they could adopt was a paper to be published weekly and 
distributed as widely as possible among the churches by inducing the 
members to subscribe. 

Disseminating information is still an important mission of the Re- 
corder, but there are other things of equal, if not greater, importance 
for which the paper exists. The country is flooded with literature, much 
of which is impure and demoralizing. This literature is findings its way 
into the homes of our people, and is being read by the children in the 
homes it enters. It is very important to have going into our homes lit- 
erature which will counteract the baleful influence of much of the lit- 
erature to which our people have access. 

In our day the foundations of our faith are being attacked as never 
before in this generation. Denial is made of many of the fundamentals 
of our faith. Some of these dangerous writings are found in religious 
publications, and very much of it in secular papers and magazines. 
Writers for these secular periodicals tell us that we have outgrown the 
religion of our fathers and must have a new religion to suit the times 
in which we live. They tell us the churches have failed, and must be 
reconstructed to suit changed conditions. If our young people read the 
discussions of religious subjects in these secular publications and form 
their conceptions of Christianity from what they read, they will turn 
away from the religion of their fathers and go after strange gods. They 
will be led to believe that the churches have failed and that something 
new is needed. 

Then there is the work of our denomination about which all our peo- 
ple should be informed, and the only means by which they can be in- 
formed is by reading the Biblical Recorder. The pastors may call at- 
tention to the work of the denomination as opportunity presents, but 
they cannot use every service for imparting information about denomi- 
national affairs as important as that is. But the Recorder goes out 
every week freighted with information that all our people should have. 
It will be seen that one cannot be an intelligent North Carolina Baptist 
without reading the Biblical Recorder. He may be an intelligent man, 
but he cannot be intelligent as to the affairs of the Baptist denomina- 
tion in this state if he does not read the Biblical Recorder. 

For these reasons, and others that might be mentioned, we urge our 
people to subscribe to and read the Biblical Recorder, which for ninety- 
three years has been the organ of the Baptist State Convention. 

If this denominational agency was needed when we numbered but 
fifteen thousand in this state, and when there were not the dangerous 
doctrines being taught that we have today, surely we need the paper 
far more now, and should endeavor to give it a more liberal support, 
and a wider circulation, that its sphere of influence may be enlarged. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

S. W. ANDREWS, Committee. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

Standing on the mountain side Jesus unbosomed to His assembled 
disciples His plans for world-wide conquest. Those plans embraced the 
entire human race and were to be executed simultaneously everywhere. 
Missionary Baptists have been among the first to catch that vision and 
to enter upon its mission. God has given to them wise leaders, stal- 
wart believers and undaunted faith. Wherever they have gone with 
their message of interpretation God has prospered them and given them 
ability to attract the attention of humanity. The cause of Christ has 



16 Fifty-fourth Annual Session 



prospered in their hands until from small beginnings they have devel- 
oped into large proportions. The past year has been the most elScient 
and prosperous of all their history. That we may appreciate the work 
of the past year let us get a birdse\^e view of our accomplishments. We 
have the following data for the close of the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tional year last. 

There were 891 missionaries, 12,611 baptisms, 103,328 church mem- 
bers, 442 houses of worship, 1,447 Sunday schools, 67,407 Sunday school 
scholars, 32,798 students in schools, 501 Foreign Missionaries and 2,820 
Native Missionaries. A gain over the previous year of 269 churches, 
4,720 baptisms, 39,077 church members, 67 houses of worship, 476 Sun- 
day schools, 13,716 Sunday school scholars, 6,280 students, 47 Foreign 
Missionaries and 1,647 Native Missionaries. When we examine this gain 
for one year we stand amazed and delighted. The percentage in gain 
is as follows: Churches 40 per cent, baptisms 175 per cent, church mem- 
bership 66 2/3 per cent, houses of worship 18 per cent, Sunday Schools 
50 per cent, students 25 per cent, Foreign Missionaries 11 per cent. Na- 
tive Missionaries 125 per cent. Please note that this increase in per 
cent is against our accumulated work from the beginning, save baptisms. 
For example, we had on all of our mission fields at the close of our con- 
ventional year for 1922, 64,251 churche members. At the close of the year 
for 1923 we had 103,328, a gain of church membership of 66 2/3 per cent 
of the fruit of our labors in church membership from the beginning of 
our Foreign Mission work. You will note that in one year we have in 
visible results accomplished 66 2/3 per cent as much as in all of the past 
history of our work combined. Surely there is great room for rejoic- 
ing here and enough to hearten the most indifferent. 

There is, however, one feature of the work that is destined to play a 
most important part in our work for 1924 that is rather alarming, and 
is calling for the very best in us from the strongest even to the very 
weakest, viz, the debt on the Board of more than one-half million dol- 
lars. This is the result after all possible retrenchment on our fields and 
in our expenses at home. The receipts for the work last year were $1,- 
705,325.52 against an expectancy at the beginning of the $75,000,000 dis- 
bursements of four million dollars. Much of our work was planned on 
the basis of $4,000,000 per year. So you can readily see the position we 
are placed in through the failure so far to meet our yearly quota. Just 
fifteen months remain till the close of the five-year period. In a state- 
ment recently issued by Dr. Love present liabilities above assets of the 
Board amount to $2,982,187.74. The consuming question is how shall we 
meet the challenge. Will the Southern Baptist Convention, the State 
Convention, the Association, the Church, the individual do the heroic 
thing and redeem our pledges, or will we ask for a compromise in the 
King's Business? God is observing with great interest the history we 
are making during these days that try men's souls. The carnal and the 
spiritual have met in one of the most strenuous battles ever waged be- 
tween these forces. Which will win? 

Encouraged by such a marvelous victory in fruitage last year and 
with the cry of the world for spiritual food ringing in our ears, we 
should be at our very best these fifteen months and bring as great a vic- 
tory in consummation as in conception. To that end we call upon the 
Mt. Zion Association to be found in the very front ranks and to render 
unto God a worthy account of her stewardship. 

GEO. T. WATKINS, 

Committee. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 17 



REPORT ON ORPHANAGE 

"A little child shall lead them." Is not this true in the largest and 
fullest sense, as we think of the marvelous growth of our Orphanage at 
Thomasville. Certainly no object lies quite so near the heart of our 
great Baptist brotherhood and deservedly so. What a great institution 
under the Grace of God it has grown to be. What a wonderful history 
it has and with greater things yet to come. On November 11th, 1885, 
the first child was received. During the thirty-eight years of its con- 
tinued growth 2,150 boys and girls have found a home and been given 
a chance to become useful men and women. Can you imagine what 
would have become of these children but for the protecting arm and 
sheltering care of the Orphanage during their tender and impressionable 
years. In the language of another "A light house is better than a life 
boat." "Save an adult, and you save a unit; save a child and you save 
a multiplication table." 

The Orphanage has sent and is sending boys and girls into all voca- 
tions of life; some to preach the unsearchable riches of our Lord and 
Master; some to be professional and business men, some to become the 
makers of happy homes. At our annual meeting in June our very 
efficient general manager. Brother Kesler, reported an enrollment of 
546 — at Thomasville 456, at Kennedy Home 90. Forty-nine mothers 
have been aided and 227 children. Making a total now being helped by 
the Orphanage 773. In view of the ever increasing demands upon our 
Orphanage, I strongly urge and recommend that every Sunday School, 
not already doing so, set a part a certain Sunday to be known as Or- 
phanage Sunday and that the collection be just as large as possible on 
that day; that each Sunday School take as many copies of "Charity and 
Children," our Orphanage paper, possible and that our various socie- 
ties and useful boxes and gifts in kind. Specially do I most ear- 
nestly urge as we near the season of Thanksgiving that we all have as 
our slogan, "One day for the Orphanage." And in the language of an- 
other let every member of our Association visit the Orphanage to bleach 
his or her soul. 

Again your committee urges that you give our Orphanage your 
heart's unfailing sympathy, your most earnest prayers and a liberal por- 
tion of your means. 

Respectfullv submitted, 

C. L. HAYWOOD, 

Committee. 

REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE 

We, your finance committee, beg leave to make the following report: 

Minute Fund $ 161.93 

Associational Missions 21 6.00 

U Million . 834.25 

Orphanage 30.00 

Ministerial Relief 50.00 



$1,292.18 

W. E. YOUNG, 
W. E. STANLEY, 
B. P. BOWLING, 

Committee. 



18 Fifty-fourth Annual Session 

REPORT OF J. N. CHEEK, TREASURER OF MT. ZION 
ASSOCIATION, OCT. 15, 1923. 

Amounts received from Churches and Finance Committee 

75 Million $ 1,184.14 

Orphanage 5.15 

Minute Fund 186.65 

Association Missions . 1,063.54 

Amount on hand last report 305.47 



$2,744.95 

DISBURSEMEKTS 

75 Million $ 1,184.14 

Orphanage 5.15 

Minutes, Clerk's Salary and Programs 240.15 

Associational Missions 881.76 

Balance on hand 433.75 



$2,744.95 
S. W. ANDREWS, 

Auditor. 
REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS 

"Wilt Thou at this time restore again the kingdom?" questioned the 
disciples of old. The Master replied; "It is not for you to know the 
course and periods of time that the Father has fixed by His own au- 
thority. You will receive power when the Holy Spirit is come upon you, 
and you will be my witnesses at Jerusalem, throughout all Judea and 
Samaria, and to the end of the earth." And then, in due time, came 
the authoritative and emphatic "Go ye therefore, and teach all nations." 

Here we have the Master's mind concerning what we term Missions. 
In these declarations we discover that the gospel was for all disciples to 
proclaim to all peoples through all the ages, beginning at Jerusalem. 
This Jerusalem starting-point may be compared to our city mission op- 
erations; Judea may stand for State Missions; Samaria may fittingly 
represent Home Missions, while the "end of the earth" and "all nations," 
rightly includes all that we understand by Foreign Missions. This fa- 
miliar illustration is brought to your attention as a reminder that Mis- 
sions, however the term may be employed, is the great business of all 
the disciples gathered into our local Baptist churches, and that this idea 
of Missions is enforced by the authoritative and emphatic "go" of our 
risen and all-empowered Lord, no matter at which segment of the circle 
we may view the divine enterprise. Home Missions is a part of world 
missions just as much as any other form of Missions. 

As there are several denominational onjects included in our seventy- 
five million budget, namely. State, Home and Foreign Missions, Chris- 
tian Education, Ministerial Relief, Orphanages and Hospitals, so also 
does our Home Mission Board direct and maintain a number of great 
enterprises for the upbuilding of the Kingdom in our South-land, eight 
in all, as follows: Enlistment, Evangelism, Mountain Schools, Foreign- 
ers, Negroes and Indians, Cuba and Panama, work among Soldiers and 
Seamen, maintenance of our great Southern Baptist Sanatorium at El 
Paso, Texas, for the scientific treatment of tuberculosis, and church ex- 
tension. The prosecution of either of these lines of endeavor would con- 
stitute a just claim on our sympathy and beneficence, while all of 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 19 



them combined becomes a challenge to our Christian conscience that can 
be answered only by our earnest prayers and most generous contribu- 
tions. 

The Home Mission Board is now in its seventy-ninth year of service. 
The early years of its history were those of small beginnings and heroic 
struggles, but the past eighteen years have witnessed marvelous progress 
and wonderful achievements. At the meeting of the Southern Baptist 
Convention last May it was reported that when the Board made its re- 
port to the Convention which met in the same city eighteen years ago 
there had been 10,551 baptisms, while the past year 38,770 were re- 
ported; eighteen years ago there were 20,570 additions to the churches 
as a direct result of the Board's agencies, this year the number reported 
was 59,597. In 1905 there was no special organized department of evonge- 
lism. Shortly afterward this department was organized with the result 
that there have been 152,846 converts baptized, 208,643 additions to the 
churches and 23,260 who have volunteered for the ministry or for defi- 
nite Mission work. Did time permit it would indeed be inspiring to note 
similar progress along all the lines of activity and service directed by 
this Home Mission agency of our denomination, showings that would 
evoke gratitude and praise to the great head of the church. 

But what of the immediate present and near-future? Will the 
achievements of the past meet the demands of today and tomorrow? 
Assuredly not. Growth, development, makes ever-larger demands. 
Greater needs and vaster opportunities than ever confronts our Home 
Mission Board on every hand; millions of unsaved in our Southland 
should be savingly reached with the blessed gospel of Christ, multitudes 
of our people should be informed as to our opportunities and mission, 
larger undertakings should be attempted all along the lines of our de- 
nominational endeavor for south-wide and world-wide conquest. Just 
one illustration to enforce this. Within the bounds of the territory cov- 
ered by the Home Mission Board we have a population of 43,000,000, of 
which number 23,000,000 ten years of age and over, are not Christians. 
Think of it ! What a dark spot on our fair southland. What a harvest 
field is that. We have not time to note the religious needs of the 
4,000,000 foreigners within our borders, the 400,000 Jews who still reject 
the Messiah, the 162,000 Indians, many of whom are unevangelized, and 
the 9,000,000 of negroes with all their T^ossibilities for good and evil. All 
of these vast numbers need the blessed gospel of our glorious Lord, nor 
do they understand aught of His saving power. Our Home Mission 
Board is our great organized agency for reachinp- vast and far-scattered 
multitudes of these people. 

It is a distressing fact that this great agency of ours is heavily in 
debt because of the enforced enlargement of its work and the lamenta- 
ble falling off in its current receipts due largely to the deflation in 
prices generally. The last report of the Board states that "if we raise 
$75,000,000 by the close of the Seventy-five Million Campaign and the 
Home Mission Board receives its due proportion, the Boards debt can 
be paid and the board's works increased fifty per cent over its present 
operations." 

Let us give our prayers and generous contributions to help this and 
all of our other denominational interests as well. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARTIN W. BUCK. 



20 Fifty-fourth Annual Session 



REPORT OF B. Y. P. U. 

"When the tethering chains which bound the war-dogs of Europe 
were loosed in 1914 and drastically broken in 1917 thereby engulfing 
most of the civilized world in the most dastardly war of all history, the 
one question of the nations was: "How shall we most efficiently and 
quickly mobilize the separate and combined armies and navies of the 
earth?" and, with spontaneous unity the answer came back, "Call the 
young manhood of the nations to great training stations and, there, drill 
soldiers today for the battle fields of tomorrow," so, in like manner 
shall the tomorrow of the moral battle fields be in direct proportion to 
the training of our youth today. 

Having learned this tremendous lesson, the Baptist Young People of 
the southland are making preparation for leadership and conquest to- 
morrow, and in this, there can exist not even the ghost of a doubt that 
when volunteers are needed and leaders are sought in world-conquest 
and reconstruction for Christ our sons and daughters shall, with Grace 
and Faith, reply: "Here am I, send me." Nor could we prophesy other- 
wise when we remember: That within the bounds of the Southern Bap- 
tist Convention 13,238 organizations for our young men and women, en- 
rolling 483,166, or a net gain from last year of 3,300 in unions, and 
167,434 members. 

That, in North Carolina, we have 1,132 unions with an enrollment of 
42,124; that in the Mt. Zion Association, there are this year 45 such or- 
ganizations enrolling 1,665 young men and women; or a gain of nearly 
20 per cent in both organizations and membership. 

There are other and greater evidences of a new day for the youth 
of our churches; and for the widening fields of usefulness to which they 
have set their hearts and hands; namely, that the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention, in session in Kansas City last May, formulated definite plans 
for recognizing the demands of these heroes of tomorrow by alloting 
definite time and place for reports and discussions, and plans for the 
B. Y. P. U.'s of the south. 

And, the further challenging fact that the B. Y. P. U.'s of North 
Carolina have pressed to the front in doing things until, today, they are 
Yoke-Fellows with the other great church forces in pronouncing the last 
syllable of all the enterprises fostered by our Baptist State Convention; 
to-wit, their great victory in leading the young men and women in the 
full payment of their pledges in conjunction with the reinforcement 
campaign last year; their challenge in Biblical Recorder campaign now 
in full swing, and the beginning of their work in conducting Sectional 
Institutes over our state. 

Suffice it to prophesy that the B. Y. P. U. is yet in her infancy, and 
faces a larger and more challenging future; as before them, we see more 
than half the churches of the Southern Baptist Convention, or 16,000 
churches, which have no organization for their youth; with nearly half 
the churches in North Carolina, or 1,234 churches, barren so far as 
B. Y. P. U. work is concerned and in the Mt. Zion Association, one 
third of the churches which have not yet offered even a Manger in which 
this child of a new day may be born. 

Therefore, with these marvelous achievements behind them, and the 
glorious prophesies of the morning light for a greater day, we would 
commend these youthful soldiers, empryos of tomorrow's leadership, to 
the endorsement and hearty support of every pastor and church in this 
Association, in our beloved state and to the uttermost bounds of the 
Southern Baptist Convention. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. B. DAVIS. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 21 



REPORT ON MINISTERIAL RELIEF 

I cannot conceive of any object presenting itself to the benevolent 
consideration of our denomination more deserving than the care and 
support of our ministers of the gospel. And it seems to me that this 
object should appeal with peculiar force and emphasis to Missionary 
Baptist because of its tendency to add to the attractiveness of the min- 
istry, as it is the ministry upon which we must depend as the most logi- 
cal and effective means of spreading the gospel to destitute home and 
foreign lands. Never did our church stand so direfully in need of 
preachers for both branches of this work as today, and this need is 
gradually growing more and more acute as we sit idly by while our 
young men who might be so inclined are turning their attention to other 
and more lucrative lines of endeavor. 

If the gospel is to reach the destitute parts of the earth it will have 
to be done mostly through the work of our ministers, and whether we 
have the ministers who are willing to enter upon this work is going to 
depend upon our willingness to uphold them with our means throughout 
their active and inactive ministries. Will we measure up to this one 
test of our denominational and religious loyalty is a question each and 
every Baptist layman tTiroughout the length and breadth of our land 
must for himself answer. I hope and trust that we, to a man, may 
awake to a sense and realization of our duty and that we may prove 
ourselves to be Missionary Baptist in the truest sense and worthy of 
the name. 

The year 1918 will mark an epoch in the history of Southern Baptist. 
The launching of the Relief and Annuity Board meant a new day, the 
dawn of a new era for our Southern Baptist ministry. One doesn't have 
to be a prophet to see this. I speak in no uncertain terms. We are en- 
gaged in a big business today; we are talking in dollars and cents, be- 
cause in that way we can easily and conveniently express ourselves, and 
back of our talk is a great overmastering idea, the recognition on the 
part of our churches of their responsibility to the ministry. Just as the 
attitude in business toward the worker has resulted in a change of in- 
dustrial condition and a new provision for the man who has grown old 
at his task, so the new attitude of our churches toward the worn out 
ministers will bring new conditions that will affect the present ministry 
and those who are to come. I think this has been proved beyond a 
question through our Ministerial Relief among Southern Baptist, dur- 
ing the past four years. 

The following figures give facts concerning our great denomination, 
in the matter of giving aid and comfort to its disabled and worn out 
ministers, their widows, and orphan children, for a period covering four 
years since the 75 million campaign was put on. 

Total No. of Total Paid to Relief Annuity Total 

Beneficiaries Beneficiaries Assets Assets Assets 

May, 1920, 500 $ 62,217.61 $ 70,974.06 $ 91,149.04 $ 162,123.10 

May, 1921, 750 118,988.82 389,783.43 525,114.27 914,897.70 

May, 1922, 804 128,966.88 419,027.25 730,061.27 1,149,088.52 

May, 1923, 925 113,322.15 496,720.61 993,472.98 1,490,193.59 

From the best estimate we can get. Southern Baptists in all the states 
put together paid to their old preachers in the three years preceding 
the 75 Million Campaign, in round numbers, $116,000. In the past three 
years, since the beginning of the campaign, we have increased the yearly 
allowance paid to our beneficiaries over the estimated three years imme- 



22 Fifty-fourth Annual Session 



diately preceding the campaign, $184,173.31, an overage of more than 
$61,000 per year. Whil^ this increase is gratifying, we are by no means 
doing what we should do. The Board has now a beneficiary list of be- 
tween eight and nine hundred. Others are being added from month to 
month. While we have made great strides since the organization of the 
new Convention Board, in giving aid and comfort to the disabled and 
retired ministers, we are not beginning to do what we should do for 
them. 

Our aim is to persuade our people to make it clear to the minister 
that after he has given himself whole-heartedly to the work, and spent 
himself freely, in his ministr3^ that if he should fall in his work, or die 
in it, or grow old in it, the denomination will not permit him nor his 
family to suffer in his declining years. 

We want to make our young preachers feel that the denomination 
has thus spoken to them, and that they can accept its word at par. To 
do this will put new life in our preachers, greatly increase their effi- 
ciency, and the denomination would be the real beneficiary. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES T. PLYBON. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS 

North Carolina Baptists really began their State Mission work in 
March, 1830. There was held in the town of Greenville, North Carolina, 
on March 26, 1830, a meeting of "the North Carolina Benevolent So- 
ciety." "A board of directors" was appointed which corresponds to our 
present Mission Board, and thus at the very first meeting of the Con- 
vention the great work of State Missions was begun. The motive that 
led to this organization was the conviction that something should be 
done to supply the destitute parts of the state with the preaching of the 
Gospel. 

Since the Civil War the following brethren have served as Corres- 
ponding Secretary: W. T. Walters, J. D. Hufham, and J. B. Richard- 
son served four years each in the order named. Then came John E. Ray 
who served ten years, C. Durham, seven years, John E. White five years, 
Livingston Johnson fifteen years, Walter N. Johnson, five years. Dr. 
C. E. Maddry became secretary January 1, 1921. 

THE PRESENT 

The work of the State Mission Board is going forward in a great 
way. The demands for assistance are greater than ever before, and our 
resources are wholly inadequate to meet the pressing needs. 

First and foremost in the State Mission program is the preaching of 
the Gospel. There is but one method of redemption from sin and that 
is the substitutionary death on the Cross of the Son of God. That, and 
that alone, is the basis of God's redemptive work. Nothing shall ever 
take the place of the public proclamation of the Gospel. That, to the 
last syllable of recorded time, must remain primal — ^it must be first. 

State Mission has for long been a great and beneficent activity among 
Baptists in the South. Home Missions is Southern Baptists acting as a 
unit to save our whole country. State Missions is Baptists acting inde- 
pendently in each state to save our whole country by contributing to its 
spiritual weal to a saved state. In many respects the two activities are 
identical. In others they are complementary. State Missions largely 
accounts for Baptist's phenominal growth and enrichment. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 23 



We have on our board this year one hundred and seventy-five mis- 
sionaries. We have a corps of four evangelists with H. T. Stevens as 
superintendent. These men are busy all the time and will make a won- 
derful report to the next convention. This department is practically 
self-sustaining. 

In the department of enlistment and country church we have six 
men, with A. C. Hamby as secretary. These men are doing splendid 
things in the matter of formulation of fields, securing better equipment 
for churches, increasing pastors salaries and building up the country 
churches. 

Secretary Middleton is directing the Sunday school work with ever 
increasing efiiciency and acceptance. He has an Elementary worker and 
two field workers under him. The Sunday school work has gone for- 
ward in a way to cheer us all, and North Carolina ranks among the 
most forward-looking and progressive states of the south. 

The Baptist Young People's Union of North Carolina has grown and 
expanded in a way that seems almost miraculous to many. There are 
now 1,150 Unions in the state. Miss Elma Leigh Farabow is leading 
the Juniors and Intermediates very efficiently. A generation of young 
church members are being trained who will literally transform our 
churches in a few years. 

It is useless to say that the W. M. U. department, under the leader- 
ship of Mrs. W. N. Jones and Miss Mary Warren, is making progress 
in a very gratifying way. Women do things in a great way. One-third 
of all the money that has been paid into the treasury of the $75,000,000 
Campaign Fund, has been paid by women. New societies are being con- 
stantly organized. The doctrine and practice of New Testament stew- 
ardship is being taught in a great many churches. The W. M. U. is 
slowly but surely transforming the devotional and spiritual life of our 
churches. 

This is an excellent showing for North Carolina Baptists. But our 
State Mission successes in North Carolina are far from completing the 
task. To the contrary, those successes stand before us now as so many 
open doors, inviting us with vision and holy passion for Christ to enter 
in and take for our Master every unevangelized community in the Com- 
monwealth. We believe it is capable of proof that the opportunities for 
Baptist State Mission work in North Carolina are fuller, brighter and 
more inviting today than ever in the past. 

Thus looking backward we have occasion for thanksgiving. Looking 
forward we see greater opportunities for service, which we would ap- 
proach with apprehension were it not that the upward look is as bright 
as the promises of God. The attitude of faith is ours. Faith touches 
God and God touches individuals. God depends upon men and women 
not only for the preaching and teaching of His word, but also for the 
financial support of His work. 

LET us HAVE LIGHT 

The burden of collecting the 75 Million Campaign funds is laid upon 
the State Mission Board. North Carolina Baptists are trailing behind 
in their payment of pledges. It is our deep conviction that these pledges 
will never be paid unless we have a great campaign of information. Let 
pastors, Sunday school teachers, W. M. U. and B. Y. P. U. leaders, and 
all who can, tell the people about the different phases of our work. Tell 
them of God's rich blessings on our Foreign Mission work, of the un- 
paralled opportunities opening before us in this field and of the urgent 
need for money to meet these opportunities. Tell them of the great 



24 Fifty-fourth Annual Session 



work done by Home and State Missions, in evangelism, in souls saved, 
the new churches organized, the new houses of worship built, or en- 
larged, and help given to weak churches. Tell the people of the great 
blessings of our hospital and orphanage work and the old preachers aid. 
Tell of the great host of young people being educated in our Christian 
institutions of learning and of the vast numbers of consecrated young 
lives being laid on the altar of God's service. Tell them of the wonder- 
ful development of our Sunday school and B. Y. P. U. work, new Sun- 
day schools organized, schools better equipped and teachers being 
trained for better service and the hosts of young people being trained 
in B. Y. P. U.'s for better service to the Kingdom. And tell them how 
all this work is handicapped in this day of opportunity for lack of 
funds. God forbid that our people should perish for lack of finowledge. 
Let the people know the truth in all these matters, and then tell them 
of their obligations as stewards of the manifold grace of God, and they 
will respond in a noble way. North Carolina is using more than $55,- 
000,000 worth of gasoline alone this year. If Baptists would give God 
one-tenth of the money they spend for gasoline they would more than 
pay up their pledges to the Campaign ! 

LET us PRAT 

When we put this Campaign over at first we had the greatest organi- 
zation Baptists have ever known, and our people prayed as perhaps they 
had never prayed before. The hour calls for thorough organization of 
our forces and for prayer. If God's people all over the state could only 
be made to see the pressing needs of the work and could be led to their 
knees before God, they would rise up in the spirit of Christ and redeem 
their pledges and thus made it possible for the work of our Christ to go 
forward gloriously. To our knees, brethren, to our knees, and let us do 
this thing for our Redeemer's sake. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. S. NORVILLE, 

Committee. 

REPORT ON ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONS AS AMENDED 

Mount Zion Baptist Association is one of the leading associations of 
the State, and has some of the strongest churches in the state. A great 
many of our now strong churches at one time received aid from the As- 
sociation. This was well and was of great benefit. Unfortunately, how- 
ever, a great many of the churches that should have cut loose long ago 
are still depending on the Association. In the hope that the time may 
soon come when every church in our bounds will not only be self sup- 
porting but will be making a large contribution to the welfare of strug- 
gling churches in North Carolina and the Southland; we make the fol- 
lowing recommendation: 

1. That the churches group themselves in compact fields so as to 
gain strength enough to cut loose from the board. 

2. That as soon as possible the churches now on the board make a 
united effort to become self supporting. 

3. That all local mission work be transferred to the State Mission 
Board and that the Executive Committee be instructed to put an Asso- 
ciational Missionary on for all or part time, using such Associational 
mission funds as are necessary therefor. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. C. CANIPE. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 25 



REPORT OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Another year has drawn to a close. What a happy year it has been 
because of the co-operation of all the officers. 

Several new lines of work have been projected with marked success. 
First was the furnishing of a room at the Baptist hospital, at Winston- 
Salem. More money came into our treasury than was needed for a 
room, so the executive committee decided to take a two bed ward. The 
cost was three hundred and seventy dollars, $370.00). 

The call was sent out to have the women meet on the steps of the 
Temple Baptist church, Durham, to have their pictures taken to be sent 
to the World's Alliance, Stockholm, Sweden. The Woman's Missionary 
Union of Mt. Zion Association had received the state banner because of 
more advancement made in the work than any other Association. The 
women met, coming from all parts of the Association. 

A chairman of personal service work was selected in March and Mrs. 
Harvey Pollard, of the First Church, Durham, has been serving in this 
capacity. 

Mrs. George H. Ross, of the East Durham Baptist Church, became 
chairman of the Standard of Excellence and the officers of the local so- 
cieties know through correspondence how faithfully she has filled this 
office. 

A need was felt because so few copies (comparatively) of our Bap- 
tist periodicals were taken in our Societies, so Mrs. J. C. Markham, of 
Temple Baptist Church, Durham, was chosen to lead in this department 
of work. 

Our second annual summer conference for auxiliary work was held 
at the Chapel Hill Baptist church June 26th, and this department of our 
work seems to meet a need. 

A prompt response from the churches secured a scholarship fund for 
a student in our Woman's Missionary Training School at Louisville, 
Kentucky, and Miss Mozelle Breeze, of Temple Baptist Church, is using 
it this year. 

Banners were ordered made to be given to the Societies attaining the 
highest standard this year. 

The Mission Study Banner went to the First Baptist Church, Bur- 
lington; The Woman's Missionary Society Banner went to the Chapel 
Hill Baptist Church; The Young Woman's Auxiliary Banner to the 
Temple Baptist Church, Durham; The Girls' Auxiliary Banner to the 
First Baptist Church, Burlington; The Royal Ambassador Banner to 
East Durham Baptist Church; The Sunbeam Banner to the First Bap- 
tist Church, Burlington. 

These banners are to be kept by the Society for one year. If any 
Society should be fortunate to hold the banner for three consecutive 
years it becomes theirs forever. 

Nine new Societies were organized this year. Five at Watts Street 
Baptist Church, Girls' Auxiliary and Royal Ambassador Band at 
Edgemont, Sunbeam Band at Mebane and a Junior Girls' Auxiliary at 
Burlington, First Church. 

Letters written 1,095 

Cards written 48 

Miles travelled 4,652 

Programs mailed . 760 

Blanks mailed 600 

Talks made 42 

Meetings attended 40 

Amount given this year to 75 Million Fund $21,888.59 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. MARVIN W. BUCK. 



MINUTES 

OF THE 



Woman's Missionary Union 



The women of Mt. Zion Association met in their annual meeting with 
the First Church, Burlington, Tuesday, September 11, beginning at 9:30. 
Devotional by Mrs. R. S. Lennon, Glencoe. Reports of ail committees 
except that of Mrs. Harvy Pollard, chairman Personal Service. 

Following the Mission Study report, a splendid pageant was given 
by the Sunbeams of First Church, Burlington. 

After Miss Jinks' report on the Training School, she called Miss 
Mozelle Breeze to the platform and presented her as the one to whom 
the Mt. Zion scholarship was given. 

At this time special music was rendered under direction of Mrs. R. 
Homer Andrews. 

An address on "Working by a Standard" by Mrs. B. K. Mason, of 
Grensboro, which was very inspiring. 

Mrs. Homer Andrews read the constitution of the Mt. Zion W. M. 
U. Association, after which Mrs. Buck appointed the following com- 
mittees: Time and place, resolution, nomination, obituary, banners. 

Pastor Buck made a few pleasing remarks and invited us all to the 
new church and explained just how it would look when finished, after 
which we were invited to the Sunday school rooms where a most boun- 
tiful dinner was enjoyed by all. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

The afternoon session was opened by the singing of a hymn. Mrs. 
M. W. Buck conducted the devotional. Mrs. Buck explained the W. M. 
U. chart of our Mt. Zion work. 

Minutes of morning session read and approved with a few correc- 
tions. 

Those who were to report on those passing away from the societies 
gave their report, the Lord having been good to us, there were only a 
few deaths reported. 

Conferences at 2 o'clock. 

Announcement of Durham Council meeting to be held with the Cedar 
Fork Church Thursday, September 20, 1923. 

Banners awarded as follows: W. M. U. Mission Study Banner, Bur- 
lington, First Church. R. A. Banner for best general work. East Dur- 
ham. G. A. Banner to Burlington, First Church. W. M. U. Banner for 
best report of general work to Chapel Hill Church. Y. W. A. Banner 
to Temple, Durham. Sunbeam Banner to Burlington, First Church. 

These banners are something new in our work and we hope they will 
inspire greater effort along all lines. 

A committee was appointed to select a motto to be placed on the 
wall of the Mt. Zion ward in the Baptist Hospital at Winston-Salem. 

We were favored with an address by our beloved state president, 
Mrs. W. N. Jones, after which Miss Jinks suggested that we rise and 
sing the first verse of "Onward Christian Soldiers." Piano solo by Mrs. 
Coble and vocal solo by Mrs. Huff. 

Miss Blanch White, W. M. U. field worker, Birmingham, Ala., gave 
an eloquent address and also inspiring, on our W. M. U. work. 

Reports of committees are as follows: 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 27 



TIME AND PLACE 

Having received invitations from Lystra, Red Mountain, Graham 
and Edgemont, your committee on "Time and Place" recommend Edge- 
mont as the place and Tuesday after the second Sunday in September, 
1924, as the time for the next annual meeting of the W. M. U. of the 
Mt. Zion Association. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. J. D. ALBRIGHT, 
MRS. R. S. LENNON, 
MRS. T. M. GREEN. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

We, your nominating committee, beg leave to submit the following 
report which recommends for election for the incoming year the follow- 
ing: 

Mrs. Martin W. Buck Superintendent 

Mrs. G. E. Isaacs Asst. Superintendent 

R. A. and Sunbeam Supt. Mrs. E. L. Baskin 

Y. W. A. and G. A. Supt. ..__.. Mrs. Walter M. Williams 

Sec-Treas. : Mrs. A. L. Bassett 

Mission Study Chairman Mrs. A. C. Howell 

Personal Service Chairman Mrs. Harvey C. Pollard 

Standard of Excellence Ch'mn. Mrs. Geo. H. Ross 

Literary Chairman J. C. Markham 

Obituary Chairman Mrs. W. R. Beech 

Committee on Training School 

( Miss Ruth Jinks 
ADVISORY BOARD -l Mrs. J. L. Gates, 

( Mrs. Cora Umstead 

Mrs. H. F. Brinson East Durham, N. C. 

Mrs. R. C. Andrews Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Mrs. E. Walton Morrisville, N. C. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. J. H. VERNON, Chairman, 
MRS. A. LACY HOLT, 
MISS RUTH JINKS, 
MISS MINNIE WARD, 
MISS WYNONA CHANEY. 

OBITUARIES 

( Mrs. J. W. Gates 

Hocutt Memorial < Mrs. T. E. Allen 

( Mrs. Annie E. Williamson 

,,^ . T^ , ( Mrs. J. R. Suitt 

West Durham \ ^.^^ Caroline Hall 

Temple I ^^^^ ^^^ Dixon 

^ ^^^ J ^ Pendergraph 



28 Fifty-fourth Annual Session 



RESOLUTIONS 

We, the committee on Resolutions, representing the women of the 
Mt. Zion Association, wish to present the following resolutions: 

First. We wish to thank the ladies of Burlington First Church for 
the spirit which prompted them to invite us to meet with them. It has 
been a real pleasure to meet together in a social and religious vf<ay. 

Second. We wish to thank our most efficient officers and executive 
committee for the splendid work of the past year, and for the helpfiri 
program as planned and carried out today. 

Third. We wish to thank everyone who had a part on the program. 
Fourth. We wish to extend a welcome to our visitors, Mrs. Jones, 
Mrs. Mason, and Miss Blanch White. We are delighted to have them 
with us. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. G. D. SMITH, 
MRS. A. C. MOSS, 
MRS. H. W. PICKETT. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL CONVENTION 

The Mt. Zion Baptist Sunday School Convention met in its eleventh 
annual session at Cedar Fork Baptist Church, Tuesday and Wednesday, 
March 20 and 21, 1923. 

The meetings were largely attended, and all present enjoyed them 
thoroughly. Rev. B. G. Early, pastor, and the members of Cedar Fork 
church certainly gave a royal welcome and provided bountifully for the 
physical needs. 

There was not a dull minute in the whole two day program which 
had been arranged by the executive committee composed of H. F. Brin- 
son, T. M. Green and H. C. Barbee. A copy of which is attached. 

The meeting adjourned to meet again next year at the same time with 
the Mt. Hermon Church. 

Bethesda church won the attendance pennant, but a number of other 
schools announced that they would have to work hard to keep it next 
year. 

Officers for the following year were elected as follows: President, 
H. C. Barbee, vice-president, J. L. Hester; secretary, Trla D. Collins; 
treasurer, R. L. Smith. 

TUESDAY— MORNING SESSION 

9 ;45 Devotional Local Pastor 

10:00 Miscellaneous Business 

10:15 General Problems of Modern Sunday Schools T. M. Green 

10:45 Class Period T. D. Collins and H. F. Brinson 

11:30 Responsibility of the Sunday School to the Church H. C. Barbee 

12:00 Recess for Lunch 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

1 :30 Devotion G. T. Watkins 

1 :45 Miscellaneous Business 

2:00 What Can We Do to Co-operate with our Church? W. M. Williams 

2:30 Class Period T. D. Collins and H. F. Brinson 

3:15 The Superintendent with His Teachers E. S. Booth 

The Teachers with The Superintendent G. T. Mills 

EVENING 
7:30 B. Y. P. U.— Under the direction of the Associational B. Y. P. U. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 29 



WEDNESDAY 

9:45 Devotional T. D. Collins 

10:00 Miscellaneous Business 

10:15 Opportunity of the S. S. in the Present Evangelistic Movement 

10:45 Class Period T. D. Collins, H. F. Brinson and J. C. Canipe 

11:30 Standardizing a Sunday School M. W. Buck and E. L. Baskin 

12:00 Dinner 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

1 :30 Devotional R. P. Ellington 

1:45 Miscellaneous Business 

2:00 The Best Methods of Providing Supply Teachers 

W. S. Olive and H. G. Dorsett 

2:30 Class Period T. D. Collins and H. F. Brinson 

3:15 The Growing Demand for a Trained Leadership in our 

Sunday Schools C. T. Plyborn and E. C. Dean 

3:45 Miscellaneous Business 
4:00 Adjournment. 

Class Studies in organization and grading based on the First 
Division of the Manual. 

H. F. BRINSON, 
T. M. GREEN, 
H. C. BARBEE, 

Executive Committee. 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE MOUNT ZION ASSOCIATION 



PLACE OF 
MEETING 



MODERATOR 



CLERK 



1870 
1871 

1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 



Mount Moriah . 
Mount Pisgah . 

Antioch 

Durham 

Lystra 

Cane Creek ....— 
Mount Hermon. 

Olive Chapel 

Bethel 

Graham 

Durham 

Mount Gilead— 
Moore's Chapel. 
Mount Pisgah... 

Chapel Hill 

Sandy Level 

Cedar Fork 

Rose of Sharon. 
Mount Carmel . 

Berea 

Red Mountain... 
Cane Creek 



1892 1 Olive Chapel 



1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 



Burlington 
Mount Moriah 

Bethesda 

Mount Gilead. 

1897 1 Berry's Grove.. 

1898 1 Antioch 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 



Mount Pisgah. 

Graham 

Lystra 

East Durham . 

Cane Creek 

Cedar Fork 

Swepsonville ... 

Bethel 

Olive Chapel ... 

1908|Burlington 

1909 1 Mars Hill 



1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 



Bells 

Berea 

Red Mountain. 

Mebane 

Yates 

Cross Roads 

Carrboro 



191 7 1 Lowe's Grove. 



1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 



No Meeting 

Mt. Hermon 

Olive Chapel 

Bethel 

Rose of Sharon. 



Rev. G. W. Purefoy. 
Rev. G. W. Purefoy. 



Wilson. 
Wilson. 



Rev. John C 

Rev. John C. Wilson 

Rev. John C. Wilson 

Rev. John C 

Rev, John C 

Rev. John C. Wilson 

Rev. J. P. Mason 

Rev. J. P. Mason 

Rev. J. P. Mason 

Rev. J. P. Mason 

Rev. J. P. Mason 

Rev. J. P. Mason 

Rev. J. P. Mason 

Rev. John C. Wilson 
Rev. John C. Wilson 
Rev. John C. Wilson 
Rev. John C. Wilson 

A B. Roberson ^..... 

W. A. Albright 

W. A. Albright 

W, A. Albright 

W. A. Albright 

Rev. J. L. Carroll 

Rev. 0. C. Horton 

Rev. O. C. Horton 

Rev. O. C. Horton 

Rev. O. C. Horton 

Rev. O. C. Horton 

T. B. Parker 

T. B. Parker 

T. B. Parker 

T. B. Parker 

T. B. Parker 

T. B. Parker 

Rev. C. J. Thompson. 
Rev. C. J. Thompson. 

Rev. W. C. Barrett 

Rev. W. C. Barrett 

Rev. W. C. Barrett 

C. P Norris 

C. P Norris 

C. P Norris 

C. P Norris 

W. R. L. Smith 

J. F. McDuffle 

J. F. McDuffie 

J. F. McDuffie 

J. F. McDuffie 

W. S. Olive 

W. S. Olive 

W. S. Olive 



H. M. C. Stroud. 
H. M. C. Stroud. 

Wilson JH. M. C. Stroud. 

H. M. C. Stroud. 
H. M. C. Stroud. 
H. M. C. Stroud. 
H. M. C. Stroud. 

R. Scott. 

R. Scott. 

R. Scott. 

R. Scott. 

R. Scott. 

R. Scott. 



C. 
C. 
C. 
C. 
C, 
C. 

C. R. Scott. 
C. R. Scott. 
C. R. Scott. 
C. R. Scott. 
C. R. Scott. 
C. R. Scott. 
C. R. Scott. 
C. R. Scott. 
C. R. Scott. 
C. R. Scott. 
C. R. Scott. 
C. R. Scott. 
C. R. Scott. 
C. R. Scott. 
C. R. Scott. 
C. R. Scott. 
C. R. Scott. 
C. R. Scott. 
C. R. Scott. 
C. R. Scott. 
C. L. Hayw^ood. 
C. L. Hayvi'ood] 
C. L. Hayvi'ood. 
C. L. Hayvs^ood] 
C. L. Hayvv^ood. 
C. L. Haywood" 
C. P. Norris. 
C. P. Norris. 

J. Husketh. 

J. Husketh. 

J. Husketh. 

J. Husketh. 

J. Husketh. 

J. Husketh. 
Chas. C. Smith. 
Chas. C. Smith. 
Chas. C. Smith. 
Chas. C. Smith. 
W. O. Williams. 
W. O. Williams. 



c^ c^ 1-^ Sq f-1 c^ Ts ( 



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: CO : IN >o 



pHTJiTji'^9^C0r-IC0(Mt-5O< 



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o o o 
o o c 



< -^ l> "O 50 O 



OOOoOOOOOOOOOoOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO oo 

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo oo 
oooo'«-*o'=>i>inooooooooooooo<o>oooo<no oo 



ooooo ,000000000000 
00000 ;oooooooooooo 
"oiocoio iicioooooOTjio'n'ooo 




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I W c3 u ^ 3 f^ ,:«;' ?^ ^ 






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? 3^ S 53 



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■c/Ddu^d^>-;z-^^a i^ 









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- cj C C 

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S£i5!>M,«>9^i5wo3C;>HG^,^5oM4ja;w'^ 







TABLE II- 


-FINANCIAL 






• 


[ 








-S 


73 




T3,' 01 




o 




CHURCHES 


GO 


QrJl 


h 


^2 


a 

§ 
a 




tj;2 






Antioch 


$ 300.00 
350.00 


II 


1 


$ 558 00 


$ 


$ 33 00 


$ 20.00 


$ 2 75 


1 


Bells — . 


49.00 








45.00 






i 




300.00 
300 00 


30.00 










40.00 


4.00 


.... 


Berry's Grove 


88 65 








Bethel 


200.00 


12.00 


65.00 


143.00 


4.00 


22.55 


5.00 


4.66 




Bethesda 


500.00 


70.00 






11.00 


50.00 




3.50 




Burlington, First 


2,400.00 


192.00 




20,000.00 


1,692.61 


507.71 


12.50 


10.00 




Hocutt Memorial 


2 330 00 




240 00 


273 56 


283 20 


1 395 71 


85.86 


99.12 




Glencoe _— 


270.00 




7.20 


13.25 


94.53 


134.02 


2.50 


17.44 


j 


Cane Creek 


400.00 
1,466.67 




61.00 




125.00 
556.54 


40.00 
279.42 




9.00 
5.00 


■" 


Carrboro 


100.00 


15,446.30 


12.00 


Chapel Hill „ 

Cedar Fork 


1,000.00 


297.75 




11,536.18 
116.64 


318 95 


565.05 




5.00 




400.00 




36.10 


78.75 


71.00 


5.00 






65.00 
2 385 00 




22.50 


8.00 
91 26 




12.00 
523 00 


140.83 


3.00 
18.50 




Durham East 


1 470 75 


325 16 


Edgemont 


2,665.00 


645.00 


427.63" 


1,608.07 


2,444.17 


373.33 


248.19 


132.00 




First 


3,022.07 


4,675.81 


690.00 


1 719.32 


844.32 


1,106.31 


483.71 


108,50 




Grace 


3,200.00 


180.06 


380.00 


12,500.00 


331.35 


630.21 


10.50 


7.50 


1 


Lakewood 


2,200.00 


120.00 


135.00 


1,844.46 


141.15 


233.29 


34.65 




Temple 

Watts Street 


3,000.00 


2,506.70 


70.00 


79 55 


1,101.32 
774.13 


349.58 




187.95 




572.50 






378 46 


98.25 




35.42 


West ♦ 


2,100.00 


1,080.00 


341.32 


1,200.00 




491.23 


36.49 


50.00 


, 


Ebenezer 


150.00 




40.00 


37.50 




10.50 


9.57 


8.60 


2.50 




Efland 


100.00 




25.00 


1.80 


7.00 


22.99 




2.00 




Ephesus 


200.00 






100 00 




30.00 








225.00 
1,150.00 




20.00 
96.00 


62.80 







36.55 
149.79 




2.50 
5.00 








1,233.56 


214.87 




Haw River 


300.00 
800.00 


18.00 
84.00 




107.00 
250.64 




176.06 
75.49 


30.00 
10.00 


6.75 
9.00 




Hillsboro, First 




75.59 


West Hill, No Letter 

Lowe's Grove 


















700 00 


50.00 


68.65 


3.50 




10 12 


12.50 


4;,50L... 


Lystra 


500.00 


50.00 


115.00 




40.00 


132.31 


23.75 


1.50 


il 


McDuffie Memorial 


100.00 

400.00 

2,000.00 




22.70 
35.40 
39.68 






24.75 

9.75 

264.87 






:| 


Mars Hill 











3.50 
60.35 


Mebane 




316.75 


507.35 


100.00 




289.61 








4.60 


18.98 




3.45 




Mnnrp''5 Phanpl 


85 00 






975.50 








2,00 






300.00 
200.00 
300.00 
283 12 








14.93 




2.50 
2.00 
2.50 
3.00 


'i 




12.00 
30.00 


31.35 
33.30 
75 00 


5.35 
500.00 






Mount Gilead 


26.00 
42.74 


40.00 


15.00 




Mount Moriah 


300'.00 
600.00 
300.00 
l,20ft.00 
150 00 






743.75 
6.00 


372.50 
18.90 


22.00 
80.20 
46.75 
8.00 
20.80 




3.00 
5.00 
2.50 
8.00 

2.48 






40.00 


42.00 
70.00 




Olivp Rrnnph 


4.85 


Olive Chanel 


210.00 


521.43 




Pleasant Hill 

TifiH A/fnnntnin 


11 50 




300 00 











6.75 




4.00 




Robeson Grove 


200 00 










12.00 




1.00 




200 00 


15.00 






50.00| 


12.001 


2.61 


3.00 




Sandy Level 

Swepsonville - 

Yates 












' 





3.40 ....f 


500 00 




101.00 




56.00 


68.00 




3.00 


600.00 
41,983.97 


60.00 
9,858.07 


38.00 
3,275.78 




30.00 
10,582.23 






4.00 ....! 


61,085.33 


8,253.32 


1,344.54 


1 855.11 


1 


















■-' 



TABLE II— FINANCIAL— (Cont.) 





S be 

11 




CO 


q 

m 
111 


c o 

to O 

si 


5 


CO 

1 

ft 




CO 

8 

£3 




It 

OH 


75 


% 


$ 60.00 $ 65.00 


1 95 00|S fi7 so 


1 33,00 


1 5.00i$ 15.001$ 


% 340.50 
103.66 
181.25 
100.00 
267,.00 
409,87 

4,040.09 

4,459.10 
113.90 
235.45 
825.00 

1,125.02 

650.32 

89.60 

4,128.48 

3,067.00 
13,475.46 

2,188.50 
224.35 

5,682.18 
49.05 

2,589.11 


% 1,299.25 


00 


103.06 
181.25 
100.00 
267.00 
258.97 










547.66 


00 
65 
55 
















555.25 
















488 65 


















722 55 


50 


18.60 
1,066.67 
1,721.12 

15 20 


35.20 
640.00 
291.50 

20.00 


53.60 
662.66 
400.00 

10.00 




43,00 

250,67 

1,105,29 

36,50 








893.47 


fi*^ 


1,066.67 

600.00 

5.00 


113.33 

65.00 

.*; 00 


200.00 

100.00 

2.20 


40.00 
176.19 


29,589.71 


42 
94 
00 


20 00 


9,437,52 
692 84 


235.45 








870 45 


24 










122,00 
530.00 
175.06 


31.00 


50.00 




18,960,24 

14,947,94 

1 357 81 


92 1' 1 

49| 440.93 
00 1 


13.00 


47.95 


74,14 

16.22 

32.00 

116.67 


14.03 


h 4r4.9'2 

11.11 

8.99 

137.17 






.'JO 00 


8.60 
62.65 








217,59 


90| 2 174 80| fiS 4,Sl 


59.30 


1,499.46 


10.00 




14,188.38 
11,646.64 
26 250 41 


641 3,067.00 
95| q fi7i? .SQl 








4.00 




2.00 




500.00 


104.25 


2,891.42 

319.40 

59.35 

764,81 




4.00 




297.40 


SO 


1,869.10 

160.00 

4,917.37 






20,006.39 

24,112.35 

13,491.69 

3,000 94 


70 










5.00 






51 















SQ 


49.05 






.. .. 


l' 


04 


2,589.11 

50.00 

58.86 

144.39 






:::;::;;;;;:::;;; 






7.S88 1.'; 


67 




1 






1 I.I 


50 00 .'lOS fi7 


79 






33.13 




25,90 
31,15 
19 00 

365:23 
26,51 

197,20 






117.89 

236.35 

19.00 

1,257.45 

26.51 


276.68 


90 








.."l 




60.81 


566.35 


S5 










365 85 


18 


758,30 






83."9'2 




50.00 
8.00 






4,233.63 
684.32 


81 













57 


358.46 

478.67 
206.46 


8.00 




19.64 




18.651 fiOQ Q«i 


1,954.52 
1 327 94 


f.l 










1 

478.67 

765,92 

7 02 


31 






215.20 




344.26 
5.00 

38.00 
204.90 

23.65 








1,643.23 

154 47 


45 












'2.02 


65 


216.00 
953.00 






15.00 








269,00 

1,176,98 

219,66 

66,50 
295,60 
116,25 
366.60 
145.10 
200.00 
897.29 
175.00 
2,097.75 

97.76 
290.62 

20.00 


717 65 


60 












19.08 
3.83 


4,507.58 
536.30 

1,138.50 
737 03 


64 
00 


56.35| 

66.50 

295.60 

1 


s'e.osi 


29.21 


6.62 


54.28 


7.67 


2.00 


43 
















70 
80 


26. oof 15.00 


20,00 


15.00 


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MINUTES 

OF THE 

FIFTY-FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 




HELD WITH 

MOUNT GILEAD BAPTIST CHURCH 

CHATHAM COUNTY, N. C. 
OCTOBER 14-15, 1924. 



The next session will be held with Mt. Ada Baptist Church, seven 

miles north of Mebane, Tuesday and Wednesday after 

the second Sunday in October 1925 






MINUTES 

OF THE 

FIFTY-FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

JCtount Sinn W^aptisi 
^ssaciation 




HELD WITH 

MOUNT GILEAD BAPTIST CHURCH 

CHATHAM COUNTY, N. C. 
OCTOBER 14-15, 1924 



The next session will be held with Mt. Ada Baptist Church, seven 

miles north of Mebane, Tuesday and Wednesday after 

the second Sunday in October 1925 



Officers 



W. M. WILLIAMS, Moderator „_ Burlington 

T. M. GREEN, Vice-Moderator Durham 

W. O. WILLIAMS, Clerk Durham 

J. N. CHEEK, Treasurer Durham 

W. S. ANDREWS, Auditor Chapel Hill 

J, F. MacDUFFIE, Historian Chapel Hill 



ORDAINED MINISTERS HOLDING CHURCH MEMBERSHIP 
IN ASSOCIATION 



Blackwood, Hoyt - Wake Forest 

Brindell, J. A. Durham 

Brinson, H. F. East Durham 

Buck, Martin W. Burlington 

Canipe, J. C. Mebane 

Cantrell, J. R. Hillsboro 

Collins, Trela D. Durham 

Cox, R. E. West Durham 

Dunnegan, W. E. Durham, R. 6 

Dean, E. C. Burlington 

Ellington, R. P. Graham 

Green, Thomas M. __ West Durham 
Harward, G. N., Morrisville, R. 1 

Hunnicutt, J. A. Hillsboro 

Johnson, C. R. Hillsboro 

Kinnett, A. D. Louisville 

Lennon, R. S. Burlington 



MacDuffie, J. F. Chapel Hill 

Mangum, W. E. Durham 

Muckle, Coy Wake Forest 

Nichols, H. S. Louisville 

Olive, E. I. Chapel Hill 

Olive, W. S. Apex, R. 3 

Overby, L. M. West Durham 

Porter, S. J. Durham 

Rankin, M. W. China 

Ross, Clarence ____ Cincinnati, Ohio 

Stanistreet, E. A. Durham 

Stubblefield, E. „._._ West Durham 

Teague, L. W. Durham 

Teel, Z. B. East Durham 

Watkins, George T. Durham 

Weeks, H. L. Durham 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
T. M, Green, J. C. Markham, Walter M. Williams to serve 1 year 
each; C. P. Norris, S. J. Porter, H. F. Brinson to serve 2 years each; 
Zeb. P. Council, W. B. Cheek, J. J. Ward to serve 3 years each. 

COMMITTEE ON ORDER OF BUSINESS 
H. L. Weeks, E. I. Olive, J. A. Hunnicutt. 

MESSENGERS 
To Southern Baptist Convention — Geo. T. Watkins. 
To Baptist State Convention— S. W. Andrews, W. H. Whitted. 

Subject Reported Discussed 

Associational Missions -— Chairman of Ex. Com. _. M. W. Buck 

Foreign Missions E. C. Dean S. J. Porter 

State Missions T. M. Green E. Stubblefield 

Home Missions W. H. Young E. I. Olive 

Orphanage T. O. Sorrell L. W. Teague 

Biblical Recorder C. R. Johnson J. R, Cantrell 

Ministerial Relief R. R. Gordon R. P. Ellington 

Christian Education K. U. Bryan H. F. Brinson 

Sunday Schools A. C. Howell W. J. Brogden 

Women's Work Mrs. H. F. Brinson Mrs. S. J. Porter 

Temperance G. T. Watkins J. C. Canipe 

B. Y. P. U. _ - . R. H. Andrews .. ... T. D. Collins 

Hospital L. G. Cole J. A. Honeycutt 



Constitution 



Article 1. This Association shall be called Mount Zion Baptist 
Association. 

Art. 2. The Association shall meet annually on Tuesday after the 
second Sunday in October, and be composed of the ordained ministers 
belonging to, and members chosen annually by the several churches 
belonging to this body, who by presenting letters from their respective 
churches certify their appointment, shall be entitled to seats. 

Art. 3. The number of delegates from each church shall be three, 
and one additional delegate from each Sabbath School connected with 
that church, who shall be a member of some Baptist Church. 

Art. 4. The letters from the churches shall state the number bap- 
tized, received by letter, restored, dismissed by letter, excluded and died 
during the past year, the total number in fellowship, and the amount 
paid as poster's salary, incidental expenses, minute fund, for the poor. 
State, Foreign, Home Missions, Educational, Baptist Orphanage, Sab- 
bath School, Old Ministers' Relief, Associational Missions and such 
other information as may be deemed necessary for i^ublication. 

Art. 5. The members thus convened shall sit as an advisory coun- 
cil, who shall have no power to infringe on any of the internal rights of 
the churches. 

Art. 6. In all their discussions and acts, this Association shall rec- 
ognize Christ as the only law^-giver in Zion, and that every individual 
church is an independent body. 

Art. 7. It shall be the duty of this Association when requested by 
aggrieved members to hear their grievances, give appropriate advice, or 
send committees to aid them in their difficulties. If the minority of the 
church is aggrieved with the inajority, upon application they shall be 
entitled to the same consideration. Individual applications will not be 
entertained. 

Art. 8. The Association shall have power to withdraw from any 
church that shall knowingly or wilfully depart from the orthodox prin- 
ciples of the religion as taught in the Bible and held by the regular 
Baptists as the true teachings thereof. 

Art. 9. The officers of this Association shall be: A Moderator, a 
Vice-Moderator, a Clerk, a Treasurer, a Historian, and an Auditor. 

Art. 10. All of the officers of this Association shall be elected annu- 
ally by ballot. 



4* Fifty-Fifth Ann [^ at. Session 

Art. 11. The Clerk shall keep a faithful record of its proceedings 
and have the minutes published and distributed to the churches accord- 
ing to the amount paid by each for such object. He shall be paid 
fifty ($50.00) dollars out of the minute fund for his work. 

Art. 12. The Historian shall collect and put in some durable form 
all facts of interest about each of the churches and report at each 
session of this body. 

Art. 13. The Treasurer shall receive and pay over to the proper 
parties all the money contributed by the churches and make an annual 
report to the Association. 

Art. 14. The Auditor shall annually examine the Treasurer's books 
attest the report. 

Art. 15. This Association shall be an Auxiliary to the Baptist State 
Convention in all Educational, Mission, Sabbath School and other work. 

Art. 16. Baptist Churches on application for admission to this body 
shall be received and their delegates seated, if necessary evidence is 
given that they are truly of our faith and order. 

Art. 17. Amendments to this Constitution may be made at any 
annual meeting, two-thirds of the members concurring. 



Enrollment 



Members from the churches enrolled as follows: 

Antioch— J. C. Lloyd, S. L. Ray, C. P. Durham, Mrs. Floy Ward. 

Bells — None enrolled. 

Berea — G. W. Upchurch. 

Berry's Grove — D. W. Dickey, W. A. Berry. 

Bethel— Luico Lloyd, T. W. Booker. 

Bethesda — M. C. Jones, Mrs. J. W. Edgerton. 

Burlington, First — Mrs. J. A. Thompson, Miss Bertha Gates, Mrs. T. W. 

Patterson, Mrs. J. C. Staley, Mrs. H. M. Montgomery, A. T. Riddle, 

Mrs. M. W. Buck. 
Burlington, Hocutt Memorial -W. E. Oldham, G. D. Smith, W. B. 

Quails, Lula Copeland, J. Forrest Quails, J. E. Parson, W. B. 

Robertson, J. M. Robinette, Mrs. W. M. Williams, Mrs. Cyrus M. 

Euliss, Jerry A. Webster, Cyrus M. Euliss, Myrtle Patterson, Lala 

Patterson, Rosa L. Patterson, Jesse Holt, W. A. Wheeler. 
Burlington, Glencoe — None enrolled. 
Cane Creek — Mrs. T. A. Andrews, Carey H. Gates, Hiram Dodson, 

Hattie L. Dodson, T. A. Andrews, A. G. Crawford, Mrs. A. G. 

Crawford. 
Carrboro — Miss Lama L. Sparrow, Mrs. A. P. Johnson, M. R. Hackney, 

W. M. Moses, M. W. Sparrow, J. N. Eubanks, C. B. Andrews. 
Chapel Hill— Mrs. J. F. McDuffie, C. B. Griffin, R. H. Eubanks, S. W. 

Andrews, Annie B. Durham. 
Cedar Fork — Hugh Green, J. H. Shipp. 
Cross Roads — J. A. Jones, H. M. Ray. 

Durham, East— W. E. Stanley, Mrs. R. S. Ellis, W. E. Young. 
Durham, Edgemout — Mrs. T. E. Herndon, Valerin Morris, Katie Stokes, 

Mrs. Annie Smith, A. W. Cain, Mrs. W. M. Upchurch, Mrs. J. L. 

Hayes. 
Durham, First — L. G. Cole, Mary Kennedy, Mrs. H. S. Pickett, Mrs. 

S. J. Porter. 
Durham, Grace— J. M. Whitted, K. U. Bryan, Mrs. J. C. Roberts, Mrs. 

L. D. Hamlin, J. P. Woodv, Mrs. J. M. Whitted, Mrs. K. U. Bryan, 

J. C. Roberts. 
Durham, Lakewood — F. A. Ward, S. E. Rochelle. 
Durham, Temple— R. J. Boiling, J. S. Wrenn, W. J. Highsmith, J. C. 

Markham, J. A. Pernell. 
Durham, Watts— J. W. Bright, J. T. Salmon, C. P. Norris. 
Durham, West — Mrs. A. H. McDonald, Mrs. Edward Stubblefield, Mrs. 

C. M. Hight, Cora Lee Cannon, C. M. Hight, Mrs. D. B. Oakley, 

W. P. Sneed, Mrs. W. P. Sneed. 
Ebenezer— A. O. Gates, Lessie Gates, Edd Rilley. 
Efland — None enrolled. 
Ephesus — G. M. Pope, Miss Anna Pope. 
Gorman — None enrolled. 
Graham — Mrs. H. M. Rogers. 
Haw River — ^None enrolled. 
Hillsboro— Mrs. W. C. Wakefield, Mrs. Chas. M. Andrews, P. H. Smith, 

Mrs. C. S. Mitchell, J. M. Carr, W. H. Walker. 



Fifty-Fifth Annuai. Session 



Hillsboro, West Hill — Mrs. Etta Crews, W. G. Mercer, Arlie M. Keck, 

C. L. Crawford, H. D. Smith. 
Lowe's Grove — C. C. Edwards, Arthur Burgess, E. D. Hopson, Thos. 

L. Pendergrass, Charles Maddry, F. M. Greene. 
Lystra— F. S. Hutchins, W. B. Cheek, Gordon Bennett, R. M. Riggs- 

bee, A. J*. Riggsbee, W. H. "Williams. 
Mars Hill— H. J. Walker, C. M. Walker, J. F. Coleman, A. A. Compton. 
McDuffie Memorial — Ruth Franklin, Mrs. J. O. Franklin, J. W. Wright, 

J. M. Franklin. 
Mebane — J. M. Rimmer, Henry H. Brown, Mrs. J. C. Canipe. 
Merry Oaks — None enrolled. 
Moore's Chapel — J. C. Thompson, R. C. Dismuke, T. A. Jones, R. F. 

Moore. 
Mount Ada— C. E. Allen, W. H. Whitted, Mrs. E. C. Crompton. 
Mount Carmel — G. U. Pendergrass, C. L, Rich, C. W. Sparrrow. 
Mount Gilead— T. W. Herndon, J. J. Johnson, W. E. Griffin. 
Mount Herman— Mrs. E. F. Harris, E. F. Harris, Mrs. O. A. Couch, 

O. A. Couch. 
Mount Moriah — J. A. Pendergraph, Fitzhugh Shepherd, E. C. Pender- 

graph, Garland Pendergraph, W. E. Carroll. 
Mount Pisgah — J. B. Harward, T. J. Wilson. 
Olive Branch — None enrolled. 

Olive Chapel— J. U. Goodwin, A. T. Olive, R. T. Mills, J. B. Mills. 
Pleasant Hill — W. A. Copeland, Miss Jennie L. Moore, H. M. Poe. 
Red Mountain — B. P. Bowling, E. T. Mangum, E. W. Crabtree. 
Robinson Grove — None enrolled. 
Rose of Sharon — Ira Dunnagan, J. L. Proctor, W. H. Smith, J. L. 

Scott, Jr., J. W. James. 
Sandy Level— Robert T. Allen, R. E. Tilley, T. W. FerreU, C. C. Lynn. 
Swepsonville — George W. Isley. 
Yates— C. M. Harris, Mrs. J. W. Cole, R. J. Pickett. 

The following pastors in the Association enrolled: 

H. F. Brinson, Martin W. Buck, C. E. Byrd, J. C. Canipe, J. R. 
Cantrell, Trela D. Collins, E. C. Dean, R. P. Ellington, L. E. M. 
Freeman, T. M. Green, J. A. Hunnicutt, C. R. Johnson, J. F. Mac- 
Duffie, G. T. Mills, C. S. Norville, Eugene Olive, S. J. Porter, 
Edward Stubblefield, L. W. Teague, Z. B. Teel, George T. Watkins, 
H. L. Weeks. 



Proceedings of 

Mount Zion Baptist Association 
Held at Mount Gilead Church 



Oct. 14th and 15tli, 1924. 

The Mount Zion Baptist Association, in its fifty-fifth an- 
nual session, convened with Mount Gilead Baptist Church, and 
was called to order at 10:00 A. M. by Moderator Walter M. Wil- 
liams. "All Hail the Power" was sung, W. R. Beach led in 
prayer and L. W. Teague, of Lakewood Church, conducted the 
devotional exercises, reading 2nd Corinthians 11th chapter and 
commenting on same. C. S. Norville led in prayer. 

L. G. Cole, Zeb Johnson and B. P. Bowling were appointed as 
tellers to enroll messengers and 133 messengers and 20 pastors 
were reported as enrolled. 

Report of the committee on order of business was adopted. 

ORjGANIZATION 

On motion M. W. Buck cast the vote of the Association for 
Walter M. Williams as moderator. 

On inotion H. L. Weeks cast the vote of the Association for T. 
M. Green as vice-moderator. 

On motion T. M. Green cast the vote of the Association for 
W. O. Williams as clerk. 

On motion the moderator cast the vote of the Association for 
J. N. Cheek as treasurer. 

On motion W. E. Stanley cast the vote of the Association for 
S. W. Andrews as auditor. 

On motion the moderator cast the vote of the Association for 
J. F. MacDuffie as historian. 

REPORTS 
J. C. Markham read the report on Sunday Schools, which was 
discussed by T. D. Collins and adopted. 



8 Fifty-Fifth Axnuai. Session 

W. E. Stanley read the report on Biblical Recorder, which 
was discussed by E. I, Oliver and W. 11. Beach and adopted. 

After singing "Praise Him;, Praise Him/' T. M. Green led 
in prayer and the introductory sermon was preached by Geo. T. 
Watkins^ using John 16:13 as his text. Theme: "The Spirit of 
Truth, the Restless Age^ and the Opportunity for a Larger Reve- 
lation." 

Dr. Livingston Johnson led in prayer. 

APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEES 

Finance — W. E. Youngs R. A. Eubanks^ J. B. Mills. 

Nominate Messenger to Southern Baptist Convention — M. W. 
Buck, J. M. Rimmer, K. U. Bryan, W. H. Williams, F. A. Ward. 

Nominate Messengers to Baptist State Convention — L. G. 
Cole^ G, D. Smith_, J. W. James, J. C. Canipe, S. L. Ray. 

Place and Preacher — II. F. Brinson, T. W. Booker, F. S. 
Hutchinson, R. T. Shipp, J. F. MacDuffie. 

Order of Business — II. L. W^eeks, E. I. Olive, J. A. Honey- 
cutt. 

On motion it was the sense of the body to make November 
Recorder month, hoping to place tlie Recorder in every home. 

NEW PASTORS RECOGNIZED 
J. A. Hunnicutt, J. R. Cantrell, Z. B. Teel, L. W. Teague, 
E. I. Oliver, S. J. Porter, E. Stubblefield, C. R. Johnson. 

RECOGNITION OF VISITORS 
Dr. Livingston Johnson, representing the Biblical Recorder; 
Dr. C. E. Brewer, president of Meredith; Perry Morgan, secre- 
tary B. Y. P. U. ; G. T. Lumpkins, superintendent of Baptist 
Hospital; Rev. H. O. Miller, High Point; Walter M. Gilmore, 
stewardship secretary, Raleigh; W. R. Beach, Biblical Recorder, 
and H. L, Swain, were recognized by the moderator. 

A committee composed of J. A. Hunnicutt, T. D. Collins, H. 
L. Swain, were appointed to digest the church letters as to 
number of baptisms and additions and amount given 75 Million 
Campaign. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 9 

Adjourned one hour for dinner, which was graciously served 
on the grounds. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

After singing "Amazing Grace," J. R. Cantrell lead the de- 
votional exercises, reading John 15:8-11 and leading in prayer. 

Walter M. Gilmore was given 10 minutes to speak on our 
Missionary program for 1925. 

Report on Christian Education was read by F. A. Ward and 
discussed by J. C. Canipe and Dr. Chas. E. Brewer. Report 
adopted. 

C. S. Norville read the report on Foreign Missions, which 
was discussed by H. L. Weeks and adopted. 

Orphanage reported by S. W. Andrews and discussed by E. 
C, Dean and Archibald Johnson and adopted. 

J. F. MacDuffie made the historian report and it was adopted 
without comment. 

G. T. Lumpkin gave us a talk on the Baptist hospital. 

Temperance reported by G. T. Mills and read by J. C. 
Canipe, was discussed by R. T. Shipp and adopted. 

Announcements and adjournment till 10:00 A. M. Wednes- 
day morning. 

WEDNESDAY— MORNING SESSION 

This session was opened by singing "We're Marching to 
Zion." R, P. Ellington led the devotional exercises, reading Mat- 
thew eleven and leading in prayer. 

The program for the day was read and approved. 

Mrs. G. E. Isaacs read the report on Woman's Work, which 
was discussed by Mrs. M. W. Buck and in closing Mrs. Buck 
introduced Mrs. S. J. Porter, the newly elected superintendent, 
and she closed the discussion. The report was adopted. 

B. Y. P. U. reported by L. E. M. Freeman and discussed by 
Miss Mary Kennedy and Perry Morgan. Report adopted. 

The 75 Million Campaign and the 1925 Campaign was dis- 
cussed by J. C. Canipe, and was followed by Dr. Chas. E. Mad- 



10 



Fifty-Fifth Annual Session 



dry, corresponding secretary, who explained fully the work being 
done and the great need of every Baptist meeting their pledges 
and the need of larger pledges for 1925. 

The report on Ministerial Relief was read by J. T. Salmon, 
and commented on by E. Stubblefield, and adopted. 

J. C. Canipe, campaign director, made a motion that this 
Association adopt the $60,000 budget set as the goal for missions 
in 1925. The motion carried. Brother Canipe spoke as to the 
suggested apportionment of missions for this Association for the 
year 1925. The apportionment follows: 



Antioch $ 460.00 

Bells 260.00 

Berea 390.00 

Bethel 525.00 

Berry's Grove 250.00 
Bethesda ..— 400.00 
Burlington — - 

First 4,000.0 

Hoc't Mem. 2,500.00 

Glencoe __-.. 125.00 

Cane Creek __ 450.00 

Carrboro ...... 1,000.00 

Chapel Hill .. 1,500.00 
Cedar Fork .. 900.00 
Cross Roads.: 160.00 
Durham — 

East 3,000.00 

Edgemont _. 3,300.00 

First 15,000.00 

Grace ........ 2,000.00 



Lakewood .. 


300.00 


Moore's 




Temple ._ ... 


6,500.00 


Chapel 


100.00 


Watts St. .- 


1,000.00 


Mt. Ada 


650.00 


West 


3,000.00 


Mt. Carmel .... 


300.00 


Ebenezer 


100.00 


Mt. Gilead ._. 


700.00 


Efland 


150.00 


Mt. Hermon .. 


300.00 


Ephesus 


200.00 


Mt. Moriah .. 


400.00 


Gorman 


100.00 


Mt. Pisgah .._- 


1,400.00 


Graham 


1,500.00 


Olive Branch 


300.00 


Haw River _. 


125.00 


Olive Chapel.. 


2,000.00 


Hillsboro — - 




Pleasant Hill 


125.00 


First 


1,000.00 


Red Mountn. 


300.00 


West Hill _. 


150.00 


Robers'n Grv. 


100.00 


Lowe's Grove 


500.00 


Rose of Sha- 




Lystra 


700.00 


ron 


175.00 


MacDuffie 




Sandy Level _. 


125.00 


Memorial .. 


100.00 


Swepsonville.. 


400.00 


Mars Hill ... 


425.00 
1,000.00 


Yates 


500.00 


Mebane 






Merry Oaks .. 


150.00 







W. G. Hughes, state evangelist, was recognized by the 
moderator. 

Nominations for members of the executive committee. 

We, your committee, beg to submit for the three expiring terms, 
the following named brethren: Zeb P. Council, of Chapel Hill; W. B. 
Cheek, of Lystra, and J. J. Ward, of Hillsboro, and recommend their 
election. 

Respectfully submitted, 

S. W. Andrews^ 
T. M. Green, 
J. C. Lloyd, 
W. E. Stanley, 
CM. Walker, 

Committee. 



On motion they were elected to serve three years. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 11 

Dismission for dinner, which was again served beautifully 
on the grounds. 

WEDNESDAY— AFTERNOON SESSION 

Devotional service was led by E. Stubblefield. After singing 
"When the Roll is Called Up Yonder/' E. I. Olive led in prayer. 
Solo "One Day/' by Mrs. C. M. Eulis. Trela D. Collins led in 
prayer. 

T. M. Green, who has been the general missionary of the As- 
sociation for the past year, read his report and commented on 
same, gave a good account of his stewardship. The report was 
adopted. 

H. F. Brinson, speaking for the executive committee, recom- 
mended that T. M. Green be employed as a full time missionary 
in the Mt. Zion Association and his salary be raised to $2,500. 
On motion this recommendation v/as adopted. 

Motion was made to have roll call of the churches to secure 
pledges to meet the salary of the missionary, but a substitute mo- 
tion, to refer the matter of securing the pledges to the executive 
committee, was carried. 

In absence of report by B. W. Rogers, Home Missions was 
discussed by S, J. Porter. 

This being the centennial year of this church. Mount Gilead, 
a historical report was given by Jeter J. Hackney, Jr., the pres- 
ent church clerk. Following which S. J. Porter and M. W. Buck 
were appointed to submit suitable resolutions and the following 
resolution was offered and adopted by a rising vote. 

RESOLUTION 

Whereas, this, the fifty-fifth meeting of our Association has been 
held with the Mt. Gilead Baptist Church as a recognition of the one 
hundredth anniversary which they are fittingly celebrating; and. 

Whereas, their arrangements for our meetings have been so help- 
fully satisfactory, their hospitality so cordial and generous, and their 
fellowship so truly Christian; therefore be it 

Resolved: That we congratulate our sister church on her long 
and useful history and her loyalty to our distinctive principles and 
denominational enterprises during this long period of time. And be it 

Resolved: That we bid our sister church a sincere God-speed as 
she enters upon the second century of her history, praying God's rich- 
est blessings on her endeavors to serve the community in the on-coming 
years. And be it 



12 Fifty-Fifth Annual Session 

Resolved: That we hereby express our sincere appreciation for the 
thoughtful and graciously generous hospitality enjoyed by all during 
the session of the Association, 

S. J. Porter^ 
M. W. Buck, 

Committee. 

Motion to include State and Home Missions reports in min- 
utes and noted as not read at the Association was passed. 

On recommendation of the committees the following messen- 
gers were elected: 

Southern Baptist Convention — Geo. T. Watkins. 
State Baptist Convention — S. W. Andrews^ W. H. Whitted. 
H. F. Brinson reported for committee on place and preacher. 
Place — Mount Ada^ Orange county ;, seven miles north of 
Mebane. 

Time^ — Tuesday after second Sunday in October. 
Preacher — E. I. Olive; alternate^ C. S. Norville. 
Report of treasurer was read by W. E. Young and adopted. 
W. E. Young made the report for the finance committee. On 
motion the report was adopted. 

Motion made that all reports not read before the Association 
to be passed on by the executive committee before printed in the 
minutes. Motion carried. 

Resolution offered by J. F. MacDufRe: 

Whereas, the Moimt Zion Association has become so great, finan- 
cially and numerically, and the time allotted for the transaction of 
the business required for the best interest of the fifty-two churches, and 
the cause of Christ at large, is inadequate for the best interest of the 
same, I move the appointment of a committee of three, consisting of 
the Moderator, Brethren J. C. Canipe and T. M. Green, to report at 
our next regular session of the Mt. Zion Association the advisability 
of dividing the Association and suggest its bounds. 

The resolution passed as read. 

Whereas, the Mt. Zion Association has become so great ; finan- 
cially and numerically, and the time allotted for the transaction 
of the business required for the best interest of the fifty-two 
churches, and the cause of Christ at large, is inadequate for the 
best interest of the same, I move the appointment of a committee 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 13 

of three^ consisting of the moderator. Brethren J. C. Canipe and 
T. M. Green, to report at our next regular session of the Mt. Zion 
Association the advisability of dividing the Association and sug- 
gests its bounds. The resolution passed as read. 

A motion made by H. F. Brinson, and passed, that those mak- 
ing reports to the Association be requested to make the report as 
brief as possible to contain the facts. 

After singing "Bless Be the Tie That Bind," S. J. Porter 
made a short talk on Wake Forest and then led in prayer and the 
Association adjourned to meet with Mount Ada Church, Tuesday 
after the second Sunday in October, 1925. 

WALTER M. WILLIAMS, Moderator. 
W. O.WILLIAMS, Clerh. 



14t Fifty-Fifth Axniiai. Session 



REPORT OF B. Y. P. U. 

Your Committee on B. Y. P. U. work begs leave to report as follows: 

The need of informed and trained church members is of the greatest 
importance. There can be no real progress in our Kingdom work without 
them; and any agency that can develop such members for us deserves 
our earnest support. 

Such an agency is the B. Y. P. U. It is the training service of the 
church, existing to prepare Baptist Young People to function intelli- 
gently in their church life. The B. Y. P. U. has carefully planned 
programs for its Sunday meetings. They are designed to cultivate 
Christian character and to develop the members into loyal and efficient 
Baptist workers. In addition, the B. Y. P. U. has a curriculum of ten 
books, treating such subjects as stewardship, church membership, Sun- 
day School and church methods, Bible Study, Doctrine, Christian ser- 
vice and Baptist history. 

The B. Y. P. U. work is fostered by the State Baptist Conventions 
and the Sunday School Board of the Southern Baptist Convention. In 
North Carolina we have three full-time workers in the field. These 
are Mr. Perry Morgan, General Secretary; Mr. Edwin S. Preston, Field 
Secretary, and Miss Elma Leigh Farabow, Junior and Intermediate 
Secretary. They conduct many training schools and institutes, hold 
conventions and rallies, and visit churches in the interest of the work. 
Their work is widespread, embracing city, town and country. 

The B. Y, P. U. work has had most gratifying development in North 
Carolina. It began in 1909. Ten Unions were represented in the first 
Convention held in Durham in 1910. Last summer the Wilmington 
Convention had over sixteen hundred representatives. The attendance 
at the B. Y. P. U. Convention now surpasses that of the Baptist State 
Convention itself. 

About 1,150 of our churches have B. Y. P. U. organizations, many 
churches having several apiece. Our Baptist schools all foster this 
work. Churches and schools together have about 1,400 organizations. 

Yet this fine growth is only a beginning. At least 1,100 of our 
churches have no training service for its young people. In the Mt. Zion 
Association there are 52 churches. In these churches there are 17 Jun- 
ior, 11 Intermediate and 27 Senior Unions. At least 25 of our churches 
have no union, according to Secretary Morgan's records. 

We recommend: (1) That each church recognize the B. Y. P. U. 
work as a challenging of such task; (2) that each church elect officers of 
the B. Y. P. U., recognize them as church officers and publicly install 
them in their duties; (3) that the churches foster the B. Y. P. U. work 
in all helpful ways, praying for it and supporting it financially if 
necessary; (4) that each church secure regular reports from its B. Y. 
P. U. organizations. Surely we cannot afi'ord to be indifferent to one 
of the most successful means yet devised for developing Christians 
trained for the tasks that will soon be theirs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. E. M. Freeman^. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 

A brief glance at the statistics of the Foreign Mission Board of the 
Southern Baptist Convention brings a most inspiring assurance over 
the success of our foreign mission cause. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 15 

We have in our foreign mission fields 1,095 churches, in which are 
enrolled 111,872 members. This is one-twenty-seventh as many churches 
as are in the bounds of the Southern Baptist Convention, and one- 
thirtieth as many members. Three hundred and eight of our churches 
abroad, or about one-third, are self-supporting. This shows a gain of 
97 over last year, or an increase of self-supporting churches of almost 
fifty per cent in one year. 

We sent out 54 new missionaries during the year, bringing the total 
of our foreign missionaries up to 544. After deducting losses we made 
a net gain of 43. This gain is enheartening, but is far below the num- 
ber which should have been sent. We need to send this year 229 others. 

The native working force now numbers 2,494. The building up of 
this working force is of great moment. We need many foreign mis- 
sionaries now, and in the future the call will perhaps be even more 
insistent, yet we cannot depend upon missionaries sent from America 
to do the major work of preaching to any country. The final evan- 
gelization of every land must be done through the native workers. 

We have had an encouraging year in our Foreign Mission Schools. 
Never have students flocked in such numbers; never have so many been 
accepted; never such large numbers turned away. We have 8()0 schools 
of all grades, in -^hich were enrolled 35,106 students. This number is 
about the same as the number of students in all our Baptist schools 
in the Southland. Twenty of these schools are kindergartens; five are 
colleges; the majority are of the lower primary and middle school grades. 
Thirteen are normal and training schools. The crown of all, of course, 
is the Bible and Theological Schools which now number seventeen, in 
which schools are being trained 416 young preachers. While these 
schools are all rendering a great service in the general uplift of the 
people, our chief interest in them lies in the fact that through them 
we turn many to the Christ, and train these students for more effective 
Christian service. Our schools are tremendous evangelizing agencies. 
In many sections the far larger number who are baptized into the 
churches are won in the school. If the school is needed here in the 
homeland for the development of our denominational life, for the pro- 
vision of a capable ministry, they are infinitely more necessary for the 
same objects in the foreign lands. 

We have medical work in three countries — China, Africa and Mexico, 
We have among our foreign missionary force, sixteen male and three 
female physicians and seven trained nurses. There are nineteen native 
physicians and twenty-nine nurses. There are twenty-three buildings 
of all descriptions in our nine hospital plants. In these are room for 
796 beds. In these hospitals were treated last year 6,299 patients. The 
patients outside of the hospitals were 70,415. The total treatments 
given reached the amazing number of 294,422. 

We have Publishing Houses organized in China, Japan, Mexico, 
Brazil, Argentinia and Italy, and embryonic publishing interests in all 
the other fields. These publishing plants bring out books, tracts, Bibles, 
Testaments, Sunday School and B. Y. P. U. Quarterlies, Sunday School 
Leaflets, denominational papers in vast quantities. 84,944,180 pages of 
literature were distributed. The silent, but none the less effective work- 
ings of the printed page, are not every time manifest, but we have 
many instances of the triumphant achievements of the Gospel sent 
forth in printed form. Many individuals have been converted through 
this means; many a home which was otherwise closed to the missionary 



16 Fifty-Fifth Annuai. Session 

has been opened through a Gospel tract or a Testament. We have a 
number of churches that have been organized as a result of someone 
having read the Word of God from the printed page. 

Thus our work abroad presses forward with the favor of God upon 
it. Southern Baptists rejoice in it, yet they are not supporting it as 
they ought and can. The Board has been compelled to halt in its 
great program right at the time when it could press the work most 
advantageously. 

In May 1923 the Board reported a debt of $403,000. In spite of 
the .severest economies this debt grew by May 1924 to $711,000. When 
appropriations were made for 1924 over $1,600,000 in requests from 
the fields were denied. The Board was able to appropriate for 1924 
only for current expenses. It allowed nothing for building and equip- 
ment. At its meeting in June 1924 the Board decided to send out 
new missionaries this year, except in a few instances where the salary 
and expenses have been especially provided. This means that practically 
all new equipment and new missionaries were cut off from the foreign 
fields this year. What this lack of help will mean to the cause no one 
can estimate. 

The situation is distressing. The only hope of remedy for it is in 
the payment of our 75 Million Campaign pledges. If these pledges are 
paid we can take care of the work. 

We call upon our churches to rally with heroic sacrifice to the com- 
pletion of the great 75 Million Campaign task. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Chas. S. Norviw.e, Committee. 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE 

In trying to write about temperance we do not wish to discuss 
everything that might come under this head, for the word temperance 
means, moderation — -particularly, habitual moderation in regard to the 
indulgence of the natural appetites and passions, and we might broaden 
the meaning of the word to cover all the activities and practices of life. 
It is our purpose, therefore, to consider the question under one head, 
viz., alcohol, in every way that it can and does influence society. 

In the first place, this is the greatest evil known among our people 
today. When we consider the wrecked homes, the hungry and ragged 
children, the ignorance, the insanity, the immorality, the divorce cases, 
and all the other bad things that whiskey is directly or indirectly respon- 
sible for. 

Once again, of all the crimes committed by all classes of people, the 
great majority can be in some way traced to the effect of the use of 
alcohol. 

In the second place, to rid society of this great evil we have voted 
prohibition and legislated against it, and to some extent have checked 
its progress; but the task is still incomplete. There are many who 
disregard the law and go on aiding and abetting, making, using and 
bootlegging liquors. 

We therefore recommend: 

First — That we urge upon all our people of every rank and station 
of life to take a firm stand out and out one hundred percent strong 
against the use of this evil. 



Mount Zion Baptist Associatiox 17 

Second — ^That we urge upon all schools to teach the rising genera- 
tions as to the bad effect of alcohol upon the human body and its far- 
reaching effect in the undermining of character, ever remembering that 
no person, people or nation can survive long who is addicted to the 
use of this great enemy. 

Third — ^That we heartily cooperate with all our officers from the 
judge on the bench down to the last man interested in putting down 
this illicit business and win a great victory for all mankind everywhere. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. T. Mills. 

REPORT OF PART TIME ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARY 
AND EVANGELIST 

To the Mt. Zion Baptist Association assembled in regular session at 
the Mt. Gilead Baptist Church, October 11-15, 1924: 

During the twelve months ending with the convening of this asso- 
ciation it has been my pleasure and privilege to devote half of my time 
to evangelistic and missionary work among the churches of this asso- 
ciation. A resumq of the work shows that every phase of this endeavor 
has been productive, and in a large measure the people throughout the 
entire bounds of this section have become awakened and responsive 
to the work. The pastors have been cordial, and have continually 
manifested a spirit of full cooperation. The accomplishments of the 
year in the time which I have been able to devote to the work only 
indicate the great opportunity which exists for organized effort among 
the various churches toward a greater strengthening along all church 
lines. The need of further aid is imperative. 

Many of tjie churches in the association have greatly increased their 
activities during the past year. Some of these churches which received 
aid from the State Board of Missions have relinquished this aid, and 
numbers of the churches have increased the salary paid the pastors. 
Sunday schools have been organized, other re-organized; W. M. U.'s 
and B. Y. P. U.'s have been organized and put on a functioning basis; 
and church work generally has been encouraged to better heights of 
attainment. 

It is impossible in this report to mention all of the individual cases 
in which it has been my pleasure to assist, but a brief summary of the 
work actually done, will reflect the progress of the year. 

Statistics covering the work, follow: Sermons preached on subjects" 
of tithing, stewardship and missions, with encouragement of the 75 
Million Campaign, and the necessity of providing for the incidental 
expenses of the church, 54; talks or addresses on Sunday school work, 
with general encouragement to the B. Y. P. U. and W. M. U., 22; 
B. Y. P. U.'s organized, 4; Sunday schools organized, 2; W. M. U.'s 
organized, 3; miles traveled, 4,500; letters written, 225; cards written, 
125; churches visited, 30; fields formed, 2; evangelistic campaigns con- 
ducted, 4; district Fifth Sunday meetings held, 2; pastors placed, 4. 

One of the largest fields formed is that including Hillsboro, Mars 
Hill, Mt. Ada and Haw River, of which Rev. J. R. Cantrell is the 
very efficient pastor. Brother Cantrell is doing some fine work on this 
field and the people are rallying to him with new vigor. All of the 
churches in this group have increased their contributions. 



18 Fjfty-Fifth Axnuai, Session 



On an early visit to Merry Oaks church I found the condition there 
rather interesting. There are a number of earnest workers there who 
want to see the work go forward. As a result of this earnestness the 
church has become more organized, the Sunday school has been brought 
into the church again from the union Sunday school of the community, 
and a regular pastor has been called who will likely take up his new 
work immediately. After several years without a regular pastor, Rev. 
C. H. Norris, of Gary, has been called. Recently two splendid men 
have been ordained as deacons and the work looks bright. 

There are several points in the bounds of our association which need 
all of the encouragement and assistance we can give. Carrboro, a band 
of truly noble people, is laboring under the burden of a new church, 
with very depressing economic conditions in the community. They 
have recently called Rev. J. A. Hunnicutt, of South Carolina, and he 
is already on the field. With grace and good leadership the clouds 
will soon pass over at Carrboro. 

In closing, let me say that my work has revealed to me a great and 
wonderful opportunity in which an associational missionary and evan- 
gelist may be of great service to the brother pastors and the work in 
general. If we get results the local church must be visited. Informa- 
tion and leadership must be given. This, of course, must be done in 
the right spirit. Our people are willing to do if they understand the 
plan and the work is placed on their hearts. This latter result can 
only be accomplished by personal contact. Better people are not to 
be found anywhere than the rural people of this association. They are 
verily the salt of the earth. These people are anxious to have their 
church combine with other churches if that combination will mean that 
all will have better preachers, and more active work. With this in 
view several fields are now under contemplation, and will likely be 
formed in the next few weeks. 

AVe have two great tasks before us: the completion of -the Seventy- 
five Million Campaign, and the starting of the 192.5 Program. They 
are gigantic tasks which only faith plus work can accomplish. Let us 
labor and pray together until the tasks are finished. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. M. Greej^. 
Durham, N. C, October 14, 1924. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

The purpose of this report is to take account of the general condi- 
tion of Sunday School work of the state, and in some definite way 
relate it to the Mt. Zion Association. This being the case a large part 
of this report will be taken from information sent out from the office 
of the general secretary. 

"Where there is no vision the people perish." We must know what 
ought to be done and how to do it, before we really achieve worth- 
while things. This vision will be caught first by a chosen few who 
will ascend the mountain with God and bring the message to the people. 
By all means let our leaders use the material obtainable that they may 
see the wonderful possibilities in the Sunday School work. 

There are 500,000 people in North Carolina in no Sunday school 
who belong to Baptist Sunday schools, if they belong to any. Consid- 
erably over 200,000 of these are church members. Plan for a religious 



Mount Ziox Baptist Association 19 

census and a follow-up canvass to reach thousands of these people. 
Many of them are ready to be reached. ''The harvest is great and the 
laborers are few." 

It is useless to reach the people unless we are prepared to take care 
of them. To do this involves properly grading and departmentizing 
your school. Every school, however small, may be graded, even if the 
departmental idea cannot be carried out. Then, again, the building 
and its furnishings must be attractive and comfortable. 

In the elementary departments the teachers and their co-workers 
must do the work, but, beginning with the Intermediates, the pupils 
must be put to work and trained in service through class activities. 
There is no more fertile field for advancement than in the organized 
class. All the information necessary for this work may be had for 
the asking. Address E. L. Middleton, Raleigh. 

If your Sunday school is not in the business of soul-winning, you 
are missing the mark. Everything else is a means to this great end. 
Study for it. Plan and pray for it. Let us have this year the greatest 
ingathering of all our history. Study ''Winning to Christ." It was 
written for you. In North Carolina there are 200,000 lost men and 
women and at least 250,000 children looking to Baptists for salvation. 

From the rural survey being issued by the Sunday School Board 
I give some facts. There are 1,998 churches in the open country and 
in villages with a population less than 1,000. There are 1,873 Sunday 
schools in these churches, but 343 close for the winter. The enrollment 
of these Sunday schools fell short of their church membership by 
59,332. There are 156,686 church members in these country churches 
not in Sunday school. Only 869 of the 1,873 schools claim to be graded, 
with 1,004 wholly ungraded. In buildings 433 have some class rooms, 
423 use curtains, and 1,017 meet in one room. 

There are now in North Carolina 2,263 churches with a membership 
of 337,258. There are 2,159 Sunday schools with a membership of 
274,524. Some of these are branch or mission schools. There are pos- 
sibly 125 churches having no Sunday school. For four years there has 
been a fine, steady growth in membership of 60,769. This is a larger 
gain than during the preceding ten years. 

During these four years there has been a real Sunday school revival 
in the Southern Baptist Convention. Every line of Sunday school work 
has taken on new life, and the outlook was never more hopeful. The 
southwide improvement in buildings, organization, teacher training and 
organized class work is great. 

Teacher training is our largest and hardest task. We must go at 
this task courageously and earnestly. Fine progress is being made. 
To date in North Carolina we have 11,298 Normal Diplomas. There 
were issued last year 5,800 awards in our state and over 65,000 in the 
entire Southern Baptist Convention. The times urge us to this task. 
Every Sunday school can and ought to put in training every officer 
and teacher and many prospective workers. It is to be hoped that 
Mt. Zion Association will join forces with the whole state in striving 
for the following goals in Sunday school work. 

We name a few things to which we must address ourselves: 
1. Endeavor to reach the 500,000 unreached in our constituency. 
Practical methods are available for this. 



20 FiFTY-FiFTK Annual Session 

2. Improve the organization by a proper grading of the pupils in 
classes and departments. 

3. Build new or remodel hundreds of church houses to meet the 
needs of the Sunday schools. 

4. Press the training of all workers with vigor and earnestness. 

5. Keep in close touch with the state Sunday school secretary, Mr. 
E. L. Middleton, Raleigh, N. C, who will furnish free all needed 
information. 

6. Make as our slogan this year, "Save the lost and train the saved." 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. C. Markham. 

HISTORIAN'S REPORT 
Graham Baptist Church 

Graham Baptist Church was organized in 1874. It joined the Mount 
Zion Association at its session held with Lystra Baptist Church in 
September 1874. 

It was organized with a membership of seven, and paid to Associa- 
tion Missions the first year the sum of one dollar. Brother W. F. Far- 
row was its pastor at the time of its organization. It seems not to 
have made much progress when first organized. 

Brother W. B. Harrell was then called to be pastor and served for 
a period of five years very efficiently. The membership of the church 
increased to twenty-five, and the contribution for all objects increased 
to $192.07. 

Brother W. L. Wright, beloved and progressive, full of zeal and 
of the Holy Ghost, accepted the pastorate, and served for three years. 
During these three years the membership increased from twenty-five 
(25) to thirty-seven (37), and the contributions for all objects from 
$192.07 to $352.53. No pastor of this church was ever loved more and 
accomplished more for the Kingdom than did Brother Wright. 

Brother C. E. Gower then accepted the church and served two years. 
The church seems to have declined during these years, as contributions 
and membership decreased. 

The church then seems to have somewhat lost interest in the cause, 
and made but little progress. It went to once-a-month preaching from 
half time, and contributions were small. Brother R. A. Moore served 
once a month for four years on very small salary, and the membership 
decreased. The Sunday school seems to have been gradually on the 
increase, and held up very well. 

During the years 1889, 1890, 1891 and 1892 the church was supplied 
by Brothers G. W. Harmon, A. T. Hord, Alvis Andrews and C. A. 
Woodson. But very little was contributed for any object during these 
years. Even pastor's salary for once-a-month preaching was very small. 

In 1893 our dearly beloved Brother J. C. Hocutt was called to the 
pastorate of the church, and moved on the field. Here, we might add, 
we have a clear demonstration of the advantage of a pastor being on 
the field. From once-a-month preaching, at a salary of fifty dollars 
($50) per year, the church went to half-time preaching at a salary of 
three hundred dollars ($300) per year. At the beginning of Brother 
Hocutt's pastorate there were forty-seven (47) members. At the expi- 
ration of the eight years he served the church there were one hundred 



Mount Ziox Baptist Associatiox 21 

and twenty members. The church paid for missions in 1893 forty-seven 
dollars ($47) ; at the close of Brother Hocutt's pastorate they paid 
four hundred and seventy dollars ($470) for missions. No brother 
has made greater sacrifice and labored more anxiously to build up 
the cause all over the Mount Zion Association, than did Brother Hocutt. 

Following Brother Hocutt's pastorate of eight years, Brother L. N. 
Chappell was called to the pastorate of the church, and served only 
one year (1901). The cause of Brother Hocutt's resignation was a 
decline of health. 

Brother J. J. Adams was then called by the church and served during 
the years 1902 and 1903. The church held its own during these years, 
with a slight increase in membership and contributions. 

Brother J. E. Davenport then accepted the work, and served for 
two years (1904-05). There was an increase in membership during 
this brother's administration from one hundred and nineteen (119) to 
one hundred and eighty-one (181) and right much increase in missions 
from $84 to $691. 

Brother S. W. Oldham then moved on the field and took charge 
of the work, and served very efficiently for five years. During these 
years the pastor's salary was increased from three hundred dollars 
($300) to four hundred and fifty dollars ($450), and contributions for 
missions from $550 to $888. Brother Oldham very much endeared him- 
self to the people of Graham, and did a work long to be remembered 
by the church and community. 

During the year 1911, the church without a pastor seems to have 
gotten somewhat on the decline. Brother Hocutt was called as a sup- 
ply, and served only two months, when Brother John Thomas finished 
out the year. 

Brother James W. Rose accepted the work and was pastor for five 
years (1912 to 1917). During these years progress was made. The 
membership of the church advanced considerably and the contributions 
were much larger than when he began the work. One year during this 
administration the church paid over eleven hundred dollars ($1100) 
for missions. 

Brother W. R. Davis was called to the pastorate of the church in 
1917, and served only one year. When Brother L. U. Western took 
charge and served during 1918. These two brethren, it seems, only 
came in as supply. The decline in the progress of the work during 
these years indicates this. 

The church seems at this juncture of the work to have become very 
much dissatisfied with the condition of things in general, and called 
Brother R. V. Ellington to its pastorate for full time. The progress 
it has made during the three years of Brother Ellington's administration 
since 1920 is indeed very encouraging. From once-a-month preaching 
it has gone to full time; from a salary of $580 for half time it has 
gone to a salary of $1,200 for full time. The pastor on the field giving 
all his time has enhanced the value of the church's property from 
$5,000 to $6,500. 

The W. M. U. organized in 1908 under Brother Oldham's adminis- 
tration paid that year (1908) $21. The minutes of the last session of 
the W. M. U. which met at Durham, N. C, show an increase to $629. 

This church, it seems, has had its struggles and difficulties to meet 
in the past. Suffice it to say, the prospects now are brighter than ever 



22 Fifty-Fifth Annuai. Session 

before. With a pastor for full time, and a live and aggressive Sunday 
school and W. M. U., we may expect greater things from Graham; 
and ere long we may see the pleasure of the Lord prospering in their 
hands. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Education needs no apology. Ignorance must seek excuses. Vast 
sums of money have been invested in institutions of learning; no one 
would care to spend a dollar in order to increase ignorance. 

Southern Baptists are coming to realize that Christian education 
is a Kingdom task. The life of a nation depends upon its schools. 
The value of a school depends upon its ideals. The ideals of a school 
have their highest worth only as they are Christian. It is the duty 
of the churches to make these ideals dominant in education. 

To this end North Carolina Baptists have inaugurated a broad and 
systematic educational program. They are undertaking to maintain 
in this state, one college for men, at Wake Forest, and two for women, 
Meredith at Raleigh, and Chowan at Murfreesboro. From the last 
reports Wake Poorest college enrolled 873 students, including the sum- 
mer school, and among these 90 ministerial students and volunteers. 
The two women's colleges, Meredith and Chowan, enrolled 582 students, 
including 26 student volunteers. The combined property value of 
these three colleges, including endowment funds, is $3,453,700. 

Besides these three institutions, there are twelve junior colleges and 
high schools in North Carolina. Mars Hill and Wingate are maintained 
as junior colleges. They enrolled last year 738 students and volunteers. 
The combined property value of these two colleges is $261,030. The 
three high schools, namely. Boiling Springs, Buies Creek and Liberty- 
Piedmont, which are under the control of the North Carolina State 
Baptist Convention, enrolled last year 780 in high school, and 389 in 
elementary school, including 82 ministerial students and volunteers. 
Their property valuation is $368,065. 

Also there are in addition to the above number of students, 100 high 
school students in the Thomasville Orphanage. The Home Mission 
Board maintains seven high schools in North Carolina. These schools 
enrolled last year 776 in high school and 284 in elementary school, 
including 62 ministerial students and volunteers. Their property value 
is $437,693. 

The totals for all Baptist schools in North Carolina are: students 
enrolled, 4,422; ministerial students and student volunteers, 336; the 
total property valuation, $4,521,488. 

South-wide institutions in which we have a part include the Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary and W. M. U. Training School at Louis- 
ville, Ky. ; the Southeastern Theological Seminary, Fort Worth, Texas, 
and the Baptist Bible Institute, New Orleans. These institutions all 
together enrolled 1,484 pupils. Their property valuation is $2,277,000. 
It is for the maintenance of these institutions that our education board 
is laboring. 

While the $5,000,000, in round numbers, which we have invested 
in school property in this state, seems a large sum, it is small in com- 
parison with the many millions invested in state schools; and the few 
thousand which we raise annually for our schools is a trifling sum 
when compared with the state's annual appropriation to her high 
schools, colleges and universities. In addition to maintaining these 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 23 

institutions themselves, we are helping to support our 330 young min- 
isterial and missionary students who are being trained in them; on 
these we spend about $18,000 a year. 

The necessity for maintainging our schools, great as it has been in 
the past, must increase rather than diminish for the future, for the 
following reasons: 

First — Because our institutions must be kept in front rank along 
with those of the state in the cultural training that they give, or we 
cannot hope to keep our Baptist boys and girls in our schools. 

Second — Heretofore, practically nine-tenths of our educated minis- 
ters and missionaries have come out of our Baptist institutions; and 
in the nature of the case, these still must be trained in our schools or 
nowhere. Moreover, the state is rapidly enlarging and strengthening 
her educational program, and compelling all her children to be edu- 
cated. This, of course, means a much more intelligent membership in 
our churches, and that we must educate a still larger proportion of 
our ministers and leaders; for an educated membership will demand an 
educated leadership. 

Third — Because of the tendency of some students of science to 
attack the Bible, from the standpoint of science, we must train our 
God-fearing men and women to meet these scientists on their own 
ground, and while pursuing all knowledge in all realms, to relate all 
knowledge and all science to God Almighty. In our school the Bible 
is revered and taught as the inspired Word of God, and the study of 
it is required by all. 

Fourth — The denominational schools emphasize not only the religious 
spirit, but the denominational principles as well, and thus they help 
to enlighten and strengthen their students in respect to our distinctive 
doctrines, and also to enlist them loyally in our Baptist enterprise. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. A. Ward. 

REPORT ON THE BIBLICAL RECORDER 

The Biblical Recorder was founded in 1833 by Thomas Meredith, 
and is therefore in its 90th year. It has served as organ of the Bap- 
tist State Convention through the years, beginning when the conven- 
tion had been organized but three years. The Recorder is owned by 
a corporation composed of 87 loyal North Carolina Baptists, who own 
the building in which the Baptist denominational work has its head- 
quarters, printing plant and other invested funds. Had they not had 
anything but the revenue derived from the Recorder, during 1923 the 
directors and stockholders would have been in debt between five and 
six thousand dollars. But due to the fact that the stockholders did 
receive revenue from the other departments in the building, they did 
receive 6% on their investment. Three years ago the Biblical Recorder 
passed the point where it was published in the interest of the stock- 
holders, and since that time it has not paid expenses. The cost of 
printing is twice as much now as it was before the war. But not one 
word of complaint have we heard from a director or stockholder. On 
the other hand, all of them seem to be glad to serve the Baptists of 
North Carolina. I think we will all agree that there should be reci- 
procity in this as in other things. We now have 22,500 subscribers. 
If we could build our circulation up to 25,000 the Recorder would be 



24 Fifty-Fifth Annual Session 

able to pay its own way and we would have that many more homes 
in which the work done by our denomination would be reached. It 
has been wisely said that the person who reads is the one who leads, 
and the only method that we as Baptists have of reaching the masses 
of our people is through our denominational paper. 

May I suggest some of the reasons why I think we should subscribe 
to the Biblical Recorder? 

First — for the information it gives about our work at home and 
abroad. 

Second — ^for the inspiration contained in the articles by some of our 
most noted Baptist writers. 

Third — Because the Biblical Recorder is doctrinal. It holds before 
us what the Baptists believe. 

Fourth — The Biblical Recorder provides suitable reading for the 
home circle and aids in counteracting the flood of evil literature that 
is published today. It is especially helpful in furnishing reading for 
children in the formative period of life as its stories and articles incul- 
cate principles of right living toward God and man. 

Fifth — Because by placing our Baptist paper in the homes along 
with the Bible we give Christ the first place in our reading. 

Sixth — Because its section on the weekly Sunday school lesson is an 
aid to students and teachers in preparing the Sabbath school lesson. 

Seventh — The Recorder is a medium priced paper, published every 
week, at the price of $2.00 per year, and should be in all of our homes. 

Respectfully submitted, 
W. E. Stai^ley. 

ORPHANAGE REPORT 

In the language of previous Orphanage reports, I quote: "A little 
child shall lead them." Touch the child, touch the heart. Our Master 
said, "Suffer little children to come unto me and forbid them not." 

When that great big white soul. Jack Mills, founded the Thomas- 
ville Orphanage, he built greater than he could have possibly dreamed. 
None of our great Christian institutions lie so close to the hearts of 
our people as our beloved Thomasville Orphanage. During its wonder- 
ful history of thirty-nine years, since November 11, 1885j around 2,200 
boys and girls have found there a home, a place where boys and girls 
are trained to make real men and women, a place where the fatherless 
and motherless children of our state are given a chance, and equipped 
to fight life's battles side by side with the sons and daughters of the 
richest rnen; a place where the best educational training is given by 
consecrated men and women whose lives show forth their calling, and 
who teach both by word and acts. The Orphanage trains its boys and 
girls for every honorable phase of life, — ministers, professional men 
and women, farmers, mechanics go forth from its doors, ready to meet 
life's battles as they may come. Any vocation in life can be filled 
and they are being filled by boys and girls trained at our own Orphan- 
age. Five hundred and fifty (550) children are at the Thomasville 
Orphanage and ninety (90) in Kennedy Home, Think what this great 
army of men and women will mean to our great civilization as they shall 
take their places in life's battles. A large number of mothers and over 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 25 

200 children have been aided, thus keeping the child under mother's un- 
erring guiding hand, thereby making men and women where these poor 
mothers could not do so. 

The increased demand with the continued high cost of the actual 
supplies necessitates a great and loyal rallying of our people in their 
contributions, and let me urge that every Sunday school in the Mt. 
Zion Association that does not now take a monthly collection set apart 
one day as Orphanage Day. It will be a spiritual leaven for all such 
Sunday schools. Do not fail to do this and take Charity and Children, 
the best paper published in North Carolina, as all subscriptions to this 
great paper aid our Orphanage. As the Thanksgiving season draws 
nigh let us all determine to give at least one day's wages; let it be 
low or high wages, give that to this great institution. If possible, let 
every one who can, visit this great plant. One look from the innocent 
faces of these 600 children, one song from the Dennis Simmons Nursery, 
will soften many cold hearts and open many tightly closed purses. And 
last, but not least, talk to God in your prayers about this, as I believe, 
one of our greatest works; ask that we all may be shown our duty to 
our Orphanage. 

Respectfully submitted, 

S. W. Andrews^ Committee. 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL RELIEF 

Brother Moderator : 

It gives me great pleasure to make a report on "The Old Minis- 
ters' Relief Work of the Mount Zion Association." 

A new slogan has been suggested for Southern Baptists in the 
work of Ministerial Relief. It is, "A pension for every worthy Baptist 
minister and from every Baptist church a full share of the cost." 
When we realize this ambition we shall have, at least in part, met our 
responsibility to those men who in youth and the prime of life gave 
themselves unreservedly to the Kingdom work, trusting God and their 
brethren to care for their declining years when, according to the laws 
of nature, it is impossible for them to take up new pursuits to provide 
for themselves, and the churches to which they have given their lives 
no longer have a pastorate to offer. 

Through the Relief and Annuity Board Southern Baptists are 
endeavoring to meet this responsibility, but while they have made 
excellent progress, the unfinished task looms up like a mountain 
before us. Our brethren of both the Methodist and Presbyterian 
churches in the South have gone far beyond us in this particular, even 
though we are much stronger numerically than they. 

Our Annuity Board stated in its last annual report that its net 
income from all sources for relief was $173,505.55. Of this it returned 
to the beneficiaries direct the sum of $125,449.50, the remainder going 
for interest and other necessary expenses. The total number of bene- 
ficiaries was given as 1,010. In round figures we gave them an average 
of $125.00 a year or approximately $10.00 a month. Surely it is a great 
opportunity to go forward. Why should the Mt. Zion Association 
not take its place in the front line with every church giving its full 
share this year to the relief of these old ministers whose strength is 
ebbing fast and to whom, no doubt, some of us owe our own Christian 
experience? 

By J. T. Salmon. 



26 Fifty-Fifth Annual Session 



WOMEN'S WORK 

The W. M. U. work in the Mount Zion Association has moved stead- 
ily forward during the past year. Nothing new in method has been 
attempted, but several phases of the work have been emphasized and 
with more marked success than in any previous year. This is notably 
true of Mission Study. 

Our annual W. M. U. meeting was held September 16 with Edge- 
mont Church, Durham. The outstanding feature of this meeting was 
the installation of new officers, who are as follows: 

Superintendent — Mrs. S. J. Porter, Durham. 

Assistant Superintendent — Mrs. H. F. Brinson, Durham. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Mrs. J. L. Gates, Durham. 

Y. W. A. and G. A. Leader— Mrs. W. M. Upchurch, Durham. 

R. A. and Sunbeam Leader — Miss Nellie Page, Nelson. 

Mission Study Superintendent — Mrs. J. M. Whitted, Durham. 

Stewardship Chairman — Mrs. A. G. Ausley, Graham. 

Personal Service Chairman — Mrs. A. J. Pollard, Durham. 

Standard of Excellence — Miss Alva Lawrence, Apex. 

Literature Secretary — Mrs. George Smith, Burlington. 

Advisory Board — Mrs. M. W. Buck, Chairman; Miss Percy Jones, 
R. F. D. 6, Durham; Mrs. Ira Mann, Carrboro, N. C. 

Last year an eifort was made by the members of the Executive 
Committee to visit all the rural churches and ask them to give their 
women and young people credit for their gifts. As a result of these 
visits we added over $6,000 to our total. 

We have given this year to the Seventy-five Million Campaign 
$27,913.27 and the grand total for the campaign has been $110,096.76, 
and we still have a few more months remaining to increase our gifts. 
We had only 14 A-1 societies reported this year and it is our earnest 
desire that many more may become A-1 during the coming year. The 
A-1 societies for this year for the W. M. U. are Burlington First 
Church, Hocutt Memorial, Lystra, Temple, Watts, and East Durham. 

Y. W. A.'s— Watts Street, Temple, East Durham, and Hocutt Me- 
morial. 

G. A.'s — Durham First and Burlington First. 

R. A.'s — East Durham. 

Sunbeams Temple and Chapel Hill. 

The Associational banners for attaining the highest standard this 
year were awarded to the following societies: 

Mission Study Banner to Temple Church. 

W. M. S. Banner to Burlington First. 

Y. W. A. Banner to Temple Church. 

G. A. Banner to East Durham. 

R. A. Banner to East Durham. 

Sunbeams Banner to Temple Church. 

Our hearts were made sad by the resignation of our most excel- 
lent Superintendent, Mrs. Buck, who so ably served us for three years, 
but we feel grateful that God has sent into our midst Mrs. S. J. Porter 
who is so capable of leading us into broad fields of service for His 
Kingdom. 

We feel that our Association is on a sound basis and that we have 
much to be grateful for in the past years' work. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 27 



For our new aim we want to especially stress several things. First 
of all comes Mission Study; why not give a strong pull all together and 
come up next year with a great report of Mission Study? Then, too, 
we want to enlist more of our women and girls and to train our young 
people for future leaders. 

May we press toward the mark for the i:)raise of the high calling of 
God in Christ Jesus. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. G. E. Isaacs. 



REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE 

We, your Finance Committee, beg leave to make the following 
report: 

Minute Fund $206.40 

Associational Missions 204.28 

Sventy-five Million Undesignated 335.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. E. Young, 
J. B. Mills, 

R. A. EUBAXKS, 

Committee. 

REPORT OF J. N. CHEEK, TREASURER OF MOUNT ZION 
ASSOCIATION— OCTOBER, 1924 

amounts received from churches anu finance committee 

75 Million $ 834.25 

Orphanage 30.00 

Ministers' Relief 50.00 

Associational Missions 1,436.75 

Minute Fund 210.93 

Amount on hand Last Report 433.75 

DISBURSEMENTS 

75 Million - $ 834.25 

Orphanage 30.00 

Ministers Relief 50.00 

Minutes 216.65 

Associational Missions 1,623.72 

By Balance on hand 241.06 



$2,995.68 $2,995.68 



28 Fifty-Fifth Annual Session 

SUNDAY SCHOOL CONVENTION 

The Mount Zion Sunday School Convention met in its twelfth annual 
session at Mount Hermon Church, Tuesday and Wednesday, March 18 
and 19, 1924. 

The meetings of the convention were full of interest throughout, 
and were well attended. At the request of the convention the execu- 
tive committee are planning a more extensive program for the coming 
year, with all departments to be given due consideration. 

The good folk of Mount Hermon Church were given a unanimous 
vote of thanks for their marked hospitality. They entertained the 
convention in a most gracious manner. 

The attendance banner was won again by the Bethesda school. 

Officers for the following year were elected as follows: President, 
W. B. Cheek; vice-president, J. A. Williams; secretary and treasurer, 
H. I. Parrish; executive committee, Trela D. Collins, T. M. Green, 
G. T. Watkins, J. C. Canipe and J. S. Porter. 

The meeting was adjourned to meet again next year at the same 
time with the I.ystra Church. 



Minutes of 
the Woman's Missionary Union 



The Mt. Zion W. M. U. Association met Tuesday morning, Septem- 
ber 16, 1924, with the Edgeraont church, Durham. Sixteen churches 
in the association were represented and one hundred and fifty delegates 
registered. 

The morning session began promptly at 10:S0 with Mrs. C. M. War- 
lick leading the devotional. 

Reports of the several officers were read and adopted, with the 
exception of Mrs. A. C. Howell, Mission Study Leader, who could not 
be with us on account of illness. 

The Secretary was requested by the association to write a letter 
of sympathy to Mr. A. C. Howell and to express our appreciation of 
the excellent work done by Mrs. Howell. After our Superintendent, 
Mrs. M. W. Buck, made her report, in a few well chosen words, she 
made a heartful appeal to the societies in behalf of the new officers 
to be elected, to send in reports of their work and send them in 
promptly. If we would please our Master, we must do our work well 
and thoroughly. 

We were favored at this time with a sweet and inspiring duet by 
Mesdames Johnson and Byrd, with Mrs. D. E. Ward at the piano. 

Miss Nellie Page, of Cedar Fork church, who was a delegate to the 
Southern Baptist Convention, made an interesting talk on the work 
of the convention and brought parts of messages from some of our 
foreign missionaries who were there. 

Dr. G. T. Watkins was recognized as a visitor at this time, also 
Miss Dorothy Kellam of Raleigh, who is the new leader of Young 
People's Work in the State. 

We had the pleasure of recognizing seven Training School girls 
with us. 

Having no application as yet for the scholarship to the Training 
School, the matter was left with the executive committee for the present. 

An oflPering was taken to aid in defraying expenses of the associa- 
tion. $16.43 was received. 

Mrs. H. F. Brinson had charge of the Question Box and several 
questions of importance to our work were given and discussed. 

Mrs. J. M. Whitted made an earnest plea that we all study our 
Mission Study Books. 

Committees on Time and Place, Obituary, Nominations and Reso- 
lutions were appointed, after which the association adjourned for lunch. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

The devotional for the afternoon session was conducted by Mrs. 
W. C, Lyon, of Durham. 

Minutes were read and approved. 

Treasurer's report on money collected at the association. 

The disposal of the scholarship fund was brought before the asso- 
ciation. 

Mrs. H. F. Brinson made a motion that the money be returned 
to the societies with the request for an additional gift to the associa- 
tion expense fund. 



30 Fifty-Fifth Annual Session 

After some discussion a motion was carried to let this fund remain 
in the bank to draw interest until it shall be needed. 

Mrs. C. E. Maddry made a strong appeal to us to pay up our 
pledges on the 75 Million Campaign. 

A beautiful solo was rendered by Mrs. W. L. Weeks. 

Prayer by Miss Wynona Chaney. 

Mrs. George H. Ross explained the changes made in the Standard 
of Excellence. 

The committee on awarding of banners was asked to retire and 
decide on the winning societies. 

Miss Dorothy Kellam made a most inspiring talk on "The Way — - 
The How— The Why, of Young People's Work." 

Mrs. H. C. Barbee favored us with a solo at this time. 

Miss Wynona Chaney explained the work being done by the Mar- 
garet Fund. Memorial service for our dead was conducted by Mrs. 
John H. Vernon, of Burlington. 

The Sunbonnet Baby was introduced by Miss Kellam, and her 
helpfulness to all Sunbeam Bands made plain. 

Report on awarding of banners. W. M. U. Banner for best general 
work. First Church, Burlington; Y. W. A. Banner, Temple, Durham; 
R. A. Banner, East Durham; G. A. Banner, First Church, Durham; 
Sunbeams Banner, Temple. 

The Mission Study Banner was not awarded this year, as our 
Leader could not finish her work, on account of ill health. 

Reports of committees are as follows: 

TIME AND PLACE 

Having considered the three invitations for our association next 
year, your Committee on Time and Place recommend Temple Church, 
Durham, as the place, and Tuesday after the second Sunday in Sep- 
tember, 1925, as the time for the next annual meeting of the W. M. U. 
of the Mt. Zion Association. 

Respectfully submitted. 
Miss Wynona Chaney^ 
Mrs. W. S. Olive, 
Mrs. V. C. Garrard. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

The committee recognizing the work of our officers, especially Mrs. 
Buck, it is with regret that we lose her as the head of our work; but 
we are grateful that one has come into our midst who, we feel confident, 
will be a worthy successor. Therefore we submit the following report 
and recommend for election for the incoming year: 

Mrs. S. J. Porter, Superintendent. 

Mrs. W. H. Brinson, Assistant Superintendent. 

Mrs. J. L. Gates, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Mrs. Hubert Warren, Leader Y. W. A. and G. A.'s. 

Miss Nellie Page, Leader R. A. and Sunbeams. 

Mrs. J. M. Whitted, Mission Study Chairman. 

Mrs. Harvey Pollard, Personal Service Chairman. 

Miss Alva Lawrence, Standard of Excellence Chairman. 

Mrs. George Smith, Literary Chairman. 

Mrs. A. G. Ausley, Obituary Chairman. 



Mount Zion Baptist Association 31 

Advisory Board — Mrs. M. W. Buck, Burlington, N. C; Mrs. Ira 
Mann, Carrboro, N. C. ; Mrs. Percy Jones, Bilboa, N. C. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. G. E. Isaacs, Mrs. Sexto 5^r Lawrekce, 

Mrs. Ji^^o. VernoK;, Mrs. Geo. H. Ross. 

Miss Valera Morris^ 

OBITUARIES 
First Church, Burlington — Mrs. J. F. Keck. 
Grace, Durham — Arnette Belvin, Sunbeam. 
Watts Street, Durham — Mrs. J. L. Wilkerson. 
West Durham — Mrs. Geo. McDaniel. 

RESOLUTIONS 

We, the Committee on Resolutions, representing the women of the 
Mt. Zion Association, wish to present the following resolutions: 

First — We wish to thank the ladies of the Edgemont Baptist Church 
for their invitation to meet with them and the gracious hospitality they 
have offered us. We deeply appreciate all their efforts in providing 
for our comfort and enjoyment. It has been a joy to meet with them 
in Christian fellowship. 

Second— We wish to thank our most efficient officers and executive 
committee for their splendid work of the past year, and for the helpful 
program as planned and carried out today. 

Third — We wish to thank everyone who has contributed to the pro- 
gram, both as to talks and music. 

Fourth — ^We wish to extend a cordial welcome to Miss Kellam, 
Mrs. C. E. Maddry, and all other visitors. We appreciate their coming 
to meet with us. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. L. D. Hamliint, 
Mrs. C. M. Warlick, 
Miss Nelije Page. 

Resolved, that whereas, Mrs. M. W. Buck, who has served us so 
faithfully for the past three years, has severed her connection as 
Superintendent of the Mt. Zion Association; and whereas, Mrs. Buck 
has filled this office in such a capable and efficient manner and has 
contributed by her personal character and missionary zeal to the 
development of the women's work throughout the entire association, 
therefore, be it resolved: 

First— That we, the W. M. U. of Mt. Zion Association, wish to 
express our hearty appreciation of her services and our love and 
esteem for this godly woman who has given so unreservedly of her time 
and has done so much to promote the growth of all the phases of our 
work. 

Second — That we pledge our loyal support, cooperation and prayers 
to her successor. 

Third — That our sincere appreciation be extended to any other 
retiring officers for their faithful services. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. L. D. Hamlik^ 
Mrs. C. M. Warlick, 
Miss Nellie Page. 



32 



Fifty-Fifth Annual Session 



HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE MOUN T ZION ASSOCIATION 



Year 


Place of Meeting 


Moderator 


Clerk 


Preacher of 
x\nnual Sermon 


1870 
1871 

1872 
1873 


Mount Moriah 

Mount Pisgah 

Antioch 

Durham 


Rev. G. W. Purefoy 

Rev. G. W. Purefoy 

Rev. John C. Wilson.... 
Rev. John C. Wilson.... 
Rev. John C. Wilson... 
Rev. John C. Wilson... 
Rev. John C. Wilson.... 
Rev. John C. Wilson.... 
Rev. J. P. Mason 


H. M. C. Stroud. 
H. M. C. Stroud. 
H. M. C. Stroud. 
H. M. C. Stroud. 
H. M. C. Stroud. 
H. M. C. Stroud. 
H. M. C. Stroud. 

C. R. Scott 

C. R.Scott 

C R Scott 


Organization 
Geo. W. Purefoy 
J. P. Montague 
J P Mason 






M. S Ferrell 






Geo. P. Moore 


1876 


Mount Hermon 

Olive Chapel 


J. H. Vernon 
C. Durham 


1878 


Bethel 


A. C. Dixon 


1879 


Graham 


Rev J P. Mason 


C Durham 


1880 




Rev. J. P. Mason 


C. R. Scott 

C. R. Scott 


J. P. Mason 


1881 


Mount Gilead 

Moore's Chapel.-... 

Mount Pisgah 

Chapel Hill 


Rev. J. P. Mason 


R. A. Patterson 


1882 


Rev J P. Mason 


C R Scott 


R H Marsh 


1883 


Rev. J. P. Mason 


C. R. Scott 




1884 


Rev J P Mason 


C. R. Scott 

C. R. Scott 

C. R. Scott 


C E Gower 






Rev. John C. Wilson... 
Rev. John C. Wilson.... 
Rev. John C. Wilson... 
Rev. John C.Wilson... 


C. C. Newton 


1886 


Cedar Fork 


W. R. Gweltney 


1887 


Rose of Sharon 

Mount Carmel 

Berea 

Red Mountain 


C. R. Scott 




1888 


C R. Scott 


Geo. B. Taylor 


1889 


C. R. Scott. ■- ... 


J. S. Dill 


1890 


W. A. Albright 

W. A. Albright 

W. A. Albright.- 

W A Albright 


C R Scott 


Not Reported 
J. L. Carroll 


1891 


C. R. Scott 

C. R. Scott 

C R Scott 


1892 


Olive Chapel 


J L Carroll 


1893 


Burlington 


W. C. Tyree 


1894 
1895 


Mount Moriah 

Bethesda 


Rev. J. L. Carroll 

Rev. 0. C. Horton 

Rev. 0. C. Horton 

Rev. 0. C. Horton 

Rev. 0. C. Horton- 

Rev. 0. C. Horton 

T B. Pa'rker 


C. R. Scott 

C. R. Scott 


W. C. Blanchard 
Geo. J. Dowell 


1896 


Mount Gilead .. . 


C R. Scott 


R. Vandeventer 


1897 


Berry's Grove 

Antioch 


C. R. Scott 


W, A. Smith 


1898 


C R Scott 


W. C Tyree 


1899 
1900 


Mount Pisgah 

Graham 


C. R. Scott 

C. R. Scott 


C. J. D. Parker 
W. F. Fry 


1901 


T. B. Parker 

T B Parker 


C. R. Scott 

C. R. Scott 

C. L. Haywood... 
C. L. Haywood... 
C. L. Haywood. - 
C. L. Haywood.. 
C. L. Haywood... 
C. L. Haywood... 
C. P. Norris 


J. Wm. Jones 


1902 


East D-urham 


J. Wm. Jones 


1908 




T B. Parker 


C. J. D. Parker 


1904 


Cedar Fork 


T. B. Parker 

T. B. Parker 

Rev. C. J. Thompson... 
Rev. C. J. Thompson... 

Rev. W. C. Barrett 

Rev. W. C. Barrett 

Rev. W. C. Barrett 

C. P. Norris....- 

C. P. Norris 

C. P. Norris 

C. P. Norris 


J. 0. Alderman 


1905 
1906 


Swepsonville 

Bethel 


A. W. Setzer 
W. C. Barrett 


1907 


Olive Chapel 


J. W. Wildman 


1908 


Burlington 


J. M. Arnett 


1909 


Mars Hill 


J. W. Wildman 


1910 


Bells 


C. P. Norris 

S. J. Husketh 

S. J. Husketh 

S.J. Husketh 

S. J. Husketh 

S. J. Husketh 

S. J. Husketh 

Chas. C. Smith.... 
Chas. C. Smith... 
Chas. C. Smith... 
Chas. C. Smith.... 
W. 0. Williams.. 
W. 0. Williams.. 
W. 0. Williams.. 


J. W. Lynch 


1911 


Berea 


M. P. Davis 


1912 
1913 


Red Mountain 

Mebane 


W. S. Olive 
J. J. Hurt 


1914 


Yates 


M. W. Buck 


1915 
1916 


Cross Roads 

Carrboro 

Lowe's Grove.- 

No Meeting 


W. R. L. Smith 

J F. McDuffie 


B. V. Ferguson 
Q. C. Davis 


1917 


J. F. McDuffie 


J. Ben. Eller 


1918 


J F McDuffie 


No Meeting 


1919 


Mt. Hermon 

Olive Chapel 


J F. McDuffie 


W. S. Olive 


1920 


W. S. Olive 


J. El wood Welsh 


1921 


Bethel 


W S. Olive 


E. D. Poe 


1922 


Rose of Sharon 

Mount Moriah 


W. S. Olive - 


E. C. Dean 


1923 


Walter M. Williams.... 


C. T. Plybon 



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